The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament [NOOK Book]

Overview

From The Second Fly Caster:

When I was a boy I thought my father was the greatest fly caster on earth, so I grew up dreaming of following in his way and not of becoming, as my mother wanted, an accountant.

Today, I am a man who often relives the important events in my life, but when I think back to the five state casting tournaments my father won, most of their images and ...
See more details below
The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$0.99
BN.com price

Overview

From The Second Fly Caster:

When I was a boy I thought my father was the greatest fly caster on earth, so I grew up dreaming of following in his way and not of becoming, as my mother wanted, an accountant.

Today, I am a man who often relives the important events in my life, but when I think back to the five state casting tournaments my father won, most of their images and sounds have melted and flowed into downstream memories, except for the images and sounds of one special tournament. Instead of fading over time, they ripened in my mind in more than just a visual way, and now they are almost as vivid as the moments of today. …

e-Story Description:

Erik, a young boy, is proud that his father, the winner of several state championships, is probably the greatest long distance fly caster on earth. But then a threatening prelude and an unexpected outcome of a casting tournament leave Erik reeling with unanswered questions about what once seemed to be only a sport.

These questions linger and then, years later, deepen when Erik’s idealistic plans and actions are crushed when he experiences combat in the Vietnam War. He struggles, unsuccessfully, with his demons, until a seemingly accidental discovery lead him back to the ways and new meanings of fly casting. Through their prism Erik learns to see himself and the world in a forgiving light.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kyrstal Larson
This novel is very short, but well-written. The characters really serve to draw the reader into the novel, the reader will soon come to know them as friends and be able to predict their actions and thoughts. This novel contains a universal truth: parents cannot be as perfect as their children would like to believe. The author finally understand this when he fights in Vietnam, an important lesson that should not be dismissed or taken lightly. Flaws are a fact of life, the sooner we realize this t
Quentin Stewart
A short but interesting look at a son's coming of age and learning lessons that were hidden to him as he grew up. The perfect father has flaws and in later life the son learns those flaws must have come about from some hurt in the past as the flaws in his character are brought out by the life experiences that he is affected by. He learns that perfecting a cast was more then trying to win a competition or casting further then others. It turns out to be a way to concentrate and to try to overcome
Tamara Montaro
This novel is very short, but well-written. The characters really serve to draw the reader into the novel, the reader will soon come to know them as friends and be able to predict their actions and thoughts. This novel contains a universal truth: parents cannot be as perfect as their children would like to believe. The author finally understand this when he fights in Vietnam, an important lesson that should not be dismissed or taken lightly. Flaws are a fact of life, the sooner we realize this t
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012382443
  • Publisher: Saw Mill River Press
  • Publication date: 4/6/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 19 KB

Meet the Author

I'm a native New Yorker. My writing has appeared in many publications, including The Flyfisher, Flyfishing & Tying Journal and Yale Anglers' Journal.

To me, much of my writing is autobiographical, as it reflects my own gratifying, but at times, difficult journey of emotional and spiritual recovery.

On the long road of my journey I slowly learned to find a way to forgive, and to connect to the good and the beautiful in the world.

(This is how I define spirituality.)

I therefore love books where the main characters struggle against inner and outer conflicts and try to do good.

I often fish the streams of Westchester, the piers of New York City and the lakes of Central Park.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 14, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    When I reviewed Randy Kadish’s other short story, The Bad,

    When I reviewed Randy Kadish’s other short story, The Bad, The Good and Two Fly Fishing Women, I was lukewarm. Kadish had done so much right: getting me to like his characters, weaving an interesting story and drawing me in, yet when I finished I was left thinking I’d missed something. I didn’t get it.

    The Second Fly Caster suffered no such problem. All the good I saw was still there, but I also intuitively understood the point of the story. One line jumped out near the end as the “heart” of the story. The note I made while reading it called it exactly that. Rather than quote that line (and maybe give too much away), I’ll say that the main lesson is one about competition, in any form, and how we should measure success. There are also some secondary lessons about parental relationships.

    **Originally written for "Books and Pals" book blog. May have received a free review copy. **

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2011

    Fly-fishing Epiphany

    A man must realize his tournament winning fly-fishing father is just an obsessive and compulsive human being with flaws before he can overcome self-doubts to deal with his own alcoholism and mature as a man. *** Author Randy Kadish draws parallels between main character Erik's and his tournament winning fly-fishing father's battle with alcoholism, unspoken horrors and feelings of failure as they both pursued unattainable goals. After cancer and alcohol took his father's life, Erik picks up the fly rod and obsessively practices fly casting, sacrificing his studies so he can cast over 100 feet to win the next tournament for his father. For both, fly-fishing became an out, a way to side step the bottle rather than face their own demons. Although the author's vivid descriptions of certain scenes engage the reader and generate interest in the main plot, the three main characters could have been more fully developed. This reader was left wondering whether the author deliberately left out what demons the father failed to face and what were the fly casting techniques left by his father. Overall it was a quick paced coming of age story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 1, 2011

    Very Good Coming of Age Story

    This is a very interesting short story about a young man coming to terms with his reality. As a child, we all believe our parents are perfect, but as time goes on, we begin to realize that they too have their faults. This is a nice, short, coming of age story in which the main character takes longer than puberty to come to terms with his father's flaws and then, overcoming those of his own. The imagery in this short story is, again, breathtaking, just like that of Kadish's novelette, The Bad, The Good and Two Fly Fishing Women. Whether you are a fly-fisher or not, this is a wonderful short story with great themes for all ages. Three and a half stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)