The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament

The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament

by Randy Kadish
     
 

From The Second Fly Caster:

When I was a boy I thought my father was the greatest fly caster on earth, so I grew up dreaming of following in his way and not of becoming, as my mother wanted, an accountant.

Today, I am a man who often relives the important events in my life, but when I think back to the five state casting tournaments my father won,… See more details below

Overview

From The Second Fly Caster:

When I was a boy I thought my father was the greatest fly caster on earth, so I grew up dreaming of following in his way and not of becoming, as my mother wanted, an accountant.

Today, I am a man who often relives the important events in my life, but when I think back to the five state casting tournaments my father won, most of their images and sounds have melted and flowed into downstream memories, except for the images and sounds of one special tournament. Instead of fading over time, they ripened in my mind in more than just a visual way, and now they are almost as vivid as the moments of today. …

e-Story Description:

Erik, a young boy, is proud that his father, the winner of several state championships, is probably the greatest long distance fly caster on earth. But then a threatening prelude and an unexpected outcome of a casting tournament leave Erik reeling with unanswered questions about what once seemed to be only a sport.

These questions linger and then, years later, deepen when Erik’s idealistic plans and actions are crushed when he experiences combat in the Vietnam War. He struggles, unsuccessfully, with his demons, until a seemingly accidental discovery lead him back to the ways and new meanings of fly casting. Through their prism Erik learns to see himself and the world in a forgiving light.

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Editorial Reviews

Kyrstal Larson
This novel is very short, but well-written. The characters really serve to draw the reader into the novel, the reader will soon come to know them as friends and be able to predict their actions and thoughts. This novel contains a universal truth: parents cannot be as perfect as their children would like to believe. The author finally understand this when he fights in Vietnam, an important lesson that should not be dismissed or taken lightly. Flaws are a fact of life, the sooner we realize this t
Quentin Stewart
A short but interesting look at a son's coming of age and learning lessons that were hidden to him as he grew up. The perfect father has flaws and in later life the son learns those flaws must have come about from some hurt in the past as the flaws in his character are brought out by the life experiences that he is affected by. He learns that perfecting a cast was more then trying to win a competition or casting further then others. It turns out to be a way to concentrate and to try to overcome
Tamara Montaro
This novel is very short, but well-written. The characters really serve to draw the reader into the novel, the reader will soon come to know them as friends and be able to predict their actions and thoughts. This novel contains a universal truth: parents cannot be as perfect as their children would like to believe. The author finally understand this when he fights in Vietnam, an important lesson that should not be dismissed or taken lightly. Flaws are a fact of life, the sooner we realize this t

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012382443
Publisher:
Saw Mill River Press
Publication date:
04/06/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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