Second Generation Mobile and Wireless Networks / Edition 1

Second Generation Mobile and Wireless Networks / Edition 1

by Uyless Black, Ulyess Black
     
 

ISBN-10: 0136212778

ISBN-13: 9780136212775

Pub. Date: 09/30/1998

Publisher: Pearson Education

CDMA, GSM, TDMA and PCS Satellite - all in one complete guidebook!

Four digital technologies -- CDMA, GSM, TDMA and PCS Satellite -- will dominate the marketplace for second-generation mobile and wireless networks. In this book, internationally respected telecommunications expert Uyless Black examines and compares all four, from the standpoint of the

Overview

CDMA, GSM, TDMA and PCS Satellite - all in one complete guidebook!

Four digital technologies -- CDMA, GSM, TDMA and PCS Satellite -- will dominate the marketplace for second-generation mobile and wireless networks. In this book, internationally respected telecommunications expert Uyless Black examines and compares all four, from the standpoint of the communications engineer and manager. You'll learn how each technology seeks to deliver improved clarity, reliability and speed. You'll also review every critical issue faced by engineers, network managers, and others involved in deploying these systems:

  • Engineering, architectural and real-world implementation challenges.
  • Capacity.
  • Data operations.
  • Roaming and security.
  • Interfaces, standards, and signaling systems.
  • Frequencies and frequency mapping.

Black clarifies the often-confusing terminology surrounding digital cellular and wireless services, and reviews the key differences between first- and second-generation networks. He presents detailed, up-to-the-minute coverage of the new GSM standard for North America; introduces new high-performance vocoders for digitizing and compressing voice signals; compares leading approaches to deploying Wireless Local Loop (WLL) technology; and previews third-generation mobile systems already on the horizon. Whatever your role in implementing wireless technology, you'll refer to this book constantly, for years to come.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780136212775
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
09/30/1998
Series:
Prentice Hall Series in Advanced Communications Technologies
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
7.32(w) x 9.58(h) x 1.29(d)

Table of Contents

PREFACE XV
CHAPTER 1 Introduction
1(38)
The Marketplace
1(2)
Review of the Air Interface Channels
3(3)
Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA)
4(1)
Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA)
4(1)
Extended TDMA (E-TDMA)
5(1)
Cook Division Multiple Access (CDMA)
5(1)
First and Second Generation Systems
6(2)
Forecasts for Analog and Digital Technologies
8(1)
Further Review of the Air Interface Channels
9(2)
Physical and Logical Channels
9(2)
The Conveyor Belt Concept
11(1)
The Time Domain
11(1)
The Frequency Domain
12(1)
A Closer Look at the Digital Signal
12(1)
Channel Organization in a Second Generation TDMA System
13(2)
Coordinating the Sending and Receiving of the Signals
15(3)
Taxonomy of Mobile Wireless Systems
18(5)
Why So Many TDMA Interfaces?
20(2)
Use Caution When Utilizing Some Terms
22(1)
A Review of the Major Components in the Mobile Wireless Network
23(2)
Connection Management (CM) Operations
25(2)
Mobility Management (MM) Operations
27(1)
Use of Identifiers
28(1)
Prevalent Protocols Used in the Second Generation System
28(3)
Typical Operations Across the Air Interface
31(4)
The Spectrum Space for the Second Generation Systems
35(1)
Summary
36(1)
Appendix 1A Progress in Digitizing the Voice Signal
37(2)
CHAPTER 2 First Generation Systems
39(16)
AMPS Architecture
39(2)
AMPS Development
41(1)
AMPS Frequency Allocations
42(1)
AMPS Identifiers
43(1)
The Station Class Mark (SCM)
44(1)
Traffic and Control Channels
44(2)
AMPS Features
46(1)
The Supervisory Audio Tone (SAT)
46(1)
The Signaling Tone (ST)
47(1)
Initialization Procedures
47(2)
Examples of AMPS Operations
49(5)
Mobile Station Originates a Call
49(1)
Mobile Station Receives a Call
50(1)
Operations on the Network Side
51(1)
Handoff Operations
52(2)
Blank and Burst Operations
54(1)
Summary
54(1)
CHAPTER 3 Digital AMPS (D-AMPS): IS-54-B
55(22)
Rationale for D-AMPS
55(1)
Review of Some AMPS Concepts and Operations
56(1)
The D-AMPS Handshake
57(1)
Frame Structure
58(1)
Redefining the AMPS Channels
59(2)
Time Alignment
61(2)
The Shortened Burst Slot
62(1)
Voice and Channel Coding
63(2)
Voice Coding
63(1)
Channel Coding
63(2)
Mobile-Assisted Handoff (MAHO)
65(2)
Use of AMPS Operations
67(1)
Security Procedures
67(1)
D-AMPS Messages
67(9)
FDTC Messages
68(4)
RDTC Messages
72(4)
Summary
76(1)
CHAPTER 4 The Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)
77(48)
Development of GSM
77(2)
Relationships of GSM and PCS 1900
79(1)
GSM Topology and Architecture
79(4)
GSM Interfaces
83(4)
The Air Interface
84(1)
The GSM Layers
85(2)
The Mobile Applications Part (MAP)
87(2)
The Functional Planes
89(3)
The Functional Planes and the Layers
90(2)
GSM Addresses and Identifiers
92(5)
How the Identifiers Are Used
94(1)
The Location Area Identifier (LAI)
95(1)
The International Mobile Station Equipment Identity (IMEI)
96(1)
The GSM Channel Operation
97(4)
A Closer Look at the TDMA Frames and Slots
101(7)
The Normal Burst
101(3)
The Frequency Correction Burst
104(1)
The Synchronization Burst
104(1)
The Access Burst
104(1)
The Complete Framing Structure
104(1)
How the Slots and Frames are Identified
105(1)
Options for Channel Organization
106(2)
GSM Authentication and Encryption
108(3)
Security of the IMSI
111(1)
The GSM Messages
111(1)
Putting It All Together
112(7)
Other Examples of GSM Operations
117(2)
Summary
119(1)
Appendix 4A European and North American Layer 1 GSM Standards
119(4)
Appendix 4B North American GSM Supplementary Services
123(2)
CHAPTER 5 IS-136
125(44)
Evolution to IS-136
126(1)
IS-136 Deployment
127(1)
The IS-136 Air Interface
127(1)
IS-136 Identification Numbers
127(3)
AMPS-Based Identifiers
127(2)
GSM-Based Identifiers
129(1)
IS-136 in the 800 and 1900 MHz Bands
130(1)
Initial Access to the System
130(1)
IS-136 Channel Organization
131(3)
Selecting a DCCH
134(1)
The IS-136 Codec
135(4)
The IS-136 Layers and Message Mapping
139(1)
Relationships of the Layers and the Channels
139(4)
Service Access Point (SAP) Concepts
140(3)
Layer 1 Operations
143(5)
The Slot Organization
143(3)
Subchanneling of the RACH
146(2)
Layer 2 Operations
148(5)
Primitives and Service Definitions
148(2)
Primitives at the Mobile Station
150(1)
Primitives at the Base Station
151(1)
Formats and Operations of the Layer 2 Frames
152(1)
Layer 3 Operations
153(11)
F-BCCH Operations
153(2)
The DCCH Structure Message
155(1)
Number of F-BCCH, E-BCCH, S-BCCH, and Reserved Slots
155(3)
SPACH Messages
158(3)
RACH Messages
161(3)
Summary
164(1)
Appendix 5A Procedure for Digital Control Channel Assignments
164(5)
CHAPTER 6 IS-95
169(50)
CDMA Deployment in the United States
169(2)
Review of Spectrum Sharing Concepts
171(1)
The IS-95 Specification
171(2)
Operations on the Forward and Reverse Channels
173(1)
CDMA Timing Operations
174(1)
Introduction to the IS-95 Channel Structure
175(2)
A More Detailed View of the Channel Structure
176(1)
The Pseudonoise (PN) Code
177(3)
Generating the PN Sequences
179(1)
Short Codes and Long Codes
180(1)
Offsetting the PN Sequence
180(1)
Key Terms and Concepts
181(1)
Soft Handoffs
182(1)
Hard Handoffs
182(2)
The IS-95 Layers
184(1)
Major Operations at the Physical Layer
185(2)
The Forward Channel
185(2)
An Analysis of the Physical Layer Functions
187(8)
Convolutional Coding
187(1)
The Repetition Function
187(2)
Block Interleaving
189(1)
Scrambling
190(1)
Power Control and Puncturing
191(1)
Orthogonal Spreading
192(1)
Quadrative Spreading
193(1)
The Reverse Channel
194(1)
An Analysis of the Channels
195(6)
The Pilot Channel
196(1)
The Sync Channel
196(1)
The Paging Channels
197(1)
Forward Traffic Channels
198(1)
Reverse Traffic Channels
199(1)
The Access Channel
200(1)
The Data Link Layer
201(2)
Layer 3 Operations
203(11)
Initialization State
205(2)
Idle State
207(6)
System Access State
213(1)
Putting It All Together
214(2)
Status of CDMA in the Marketplace
216(1)
Summary
217(1)
Appendix 6A The CDMA Family
217(2)
CHAPTER 7 IS-41-C and IS-634
219(42)
The IS-41-C Specification
220(1)
The IS-41-C Model
220(2)
Terms and Concepts
222(1)
The Layered Structure of IS-41-C
223(5)
The Bearer Services
225(2)
Use of the Layer 7 Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
227(1)
The Five Security/Privacy Operations
228(1)
Authentication Parameters
229(1)
Authentication of Mobile Station Registration Procedures
230(3)
The Parameters
230(1)
At the Air Interface
231(1)
On the Network Side
232(1)
Unique Challenge-Response Procedures
233(2)
The Parameters
233(1)
At the Air Interface
234(1)
On the Network Side
234(1)
Authentication of Mobile Station Originating a Call
235(3)
The Parameters
235(1)
At the Air Interface
236(1)
On the Network Side
237(1)
Authentication of a Call to a Terminating Mobile Station
238(2)
The Parameters
238(1)
At the Air Interface
239(1)
On the Network Side
239(1)
Updating the Shared Secret Data (SSD)
240(3)
The Parameters
240(1)
At the Air Interface and on the Network Side
241(2)
Registration in a New Service Area
243(2)
Calling an Idle Mobile Station
245(2)
Calling a Busy Mobile Station
247(1)
Call Forwarding
248(1)
Recovery from an HLR Failure
248(1)
Handoff Between MSCs
249(1)
Handling a Call Collision
250(1)
Call Waiting
251(1)
Mobile Station Is Inactive, then Active
252(1)
IS-41-C and AMPS Interworking
253(1)
Interworking GSM and IS-41
253(3)
IS-634
256(1)
Support of the IS-95 Air Interface
257(3)
Summary
260(1)
CHAPTER 8 Satellite PCS
261(19)
The ALOHA Legacy
261(4)
TDMA on Satellites
265(1)
A Look at the GEOs
265(3)
LEO and MEO Satellite Systems for Voice Technology
268(2)
Mobile Base Stations
270(1)
Examples of Voice-Oriented Satellite PCS Deployment
271(4)
Iridium
271(3)
Globalstar
274(1)
ICO
275(1)
LEO, MEO, and GEO Satellite Systems for Data Technology
275(3)
Little LEOs
278(1)
What Is Next?
278(1)
Summary
279(1)
CHAPTER 9 Data Operations
280(43)
Market Forecasts
281(1)
Connection Options
282(2)
The Terminal Adaptation (TA) Model
284(4)
TA Support Services
286(2)
Upcoming Capabilities
288(1)
TCP/IP on Mobile Wireless Systems
288(2)
Traffic Management and Integrity Issues
290(3)
The CDPD Network
293(17)
Typical CDPD Topology
294(2)
Sharing the AMPS Voice Channels
296(2)
Planned and Forced Channel Hops
298(1)
Messages for Channel Configuration and Hopping
298(1)
Mobility Management
299(2)
Intra-Area Cell Transfer
301(1)
Inter-Area Cell Transfer
302(1)
The CDPD Layers
303(2)
Intended Services
305(2)
CDPD Layer Relationships
307(2)
Physical Layer Interfaces
309(1)
Data Flow Example
310(1)
New Initiatives
310(9)
The High-Speed Circuit Switched Data Service (HSCSD)
315(1)
GSM Packet Radio Service (GPRS)
316(2)
12.0 kbits/s Operations
318(1)
The 14.4 kbits/s Service
318(1)
Mobile IP
319(3)
Summary
322(1)
CHAPTER 10 The Wireless Local Loop (WLL)
323(14)
Topology of WLL
324(1)
WLL versus Fixed Wire Access
325(1)
WLL Options
326(1)
Local Multipoint Multichannel Distribution Service (LMDS) and Multipoint Multichannel Distribution Service (MMDS)
326(1)
DECT: An Alternative for WLL
327(3)
DECT Architecture
328(1)
Support of Data
329(1)
DECT Architecture
330(6)
Other Aspects of DECT
336(1)
Summary
336(1)
CHAPTER 11 Third Generation Mobile Systems (TGMSs)
337(12)
A Vision of the Future
337(3)
The Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS)
340(1)
The UMTS Architecture
341(2)
The Layered Architecture
343(2)
The FRAMES Project
345(1)
Features and Objectives of TGMS
345(3)
Summary
348(1)
Abbreviations/Acronyms 349(6)
Index 355

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