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Second Genesis
     

Second Genesis

3.0 3
by Jeffrey Anderson
 

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SURVIVAL IS AN INSTINCT

In a private compound deep in the jungles of the Amazon rain forest, a team of scientists, expert in stem cell engineering, is playing God. With unnerving success. Among them, young biologist Jamie Kendrick is grappling with the implications of the lab's creation--a genetically altered chimpanzee, as intelligent, as soulful, and as

Overview

SURVIVAL IS AN INSTINCT

In a private compound deep in the jungles of the Amazon rain forest, a team of scientists, expert in stem cell engineering, is playing God. With unnerving success. Among them, young biologist Jamie Kendrick is grappling with the implications of the lab's creation--a genetically altered chimpanzee, as intelligent, as soulful, and as sentient as man. It reads. It writes. It reasons. And like man, it hunts.

SO IS FEAR

When a lead scientist is brutally murdered and the chimps escape, Jamie stumbles upon shocking new discoveries--the unethical origin of the project, where the terrifying experiment is ultimately headed, and its potential to render humanity obsolete.

And no one knows what has been unleashed.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780515141986
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
07/25/2006
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
4.12(w) x 6.78(h) x 1.07(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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Second Genesis 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has to be the worst one I have ever read! I mean a bunch of monkeys piloting a ferry down the river? I mean I can suspend disbelief, but this book was so horrible I couldnt even laugh at it. Maybe as a reference to new writers on how to not write a book would give this some value. I sit here shaking my head as I write this in disbelief of how bad this book is.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This isn't a bad book (I'd give it 3 1/2 stars if that was an option), but I had a hard time from the outset with the fact that a PhD doesn't know that a chimp is an ape, not a 'monkey'. (Says it over and over in the narrative voice, plus a few characters.) Apparently his editor doesn't know it either. Come on folks. If it's a science thriller, you need to get your science right. Go ahead and read the book, just ignore the 'monkey' part if you care at all about Zoology or Primatology.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Field biologist Jamie Kendrick is in Amazonia, Brazil in the middle of the rain forest conducting research when one of her colleagues informs her that a fenced compound is nearby. Curious, she visits the site and manages to get inside where she sees a chimp wearing a collar staring back until he writes on the ground ¿Who am I¿? Excited and startled, she guesses that Lula DaSilva Wildlife Preservation and Brainstem Therapeutic Research Lab has done some stem cell engineering using human DNA in chimps.--------------- The project director Dr. Nakamura hires Jamie. She conducts tests that reveal the chimp¿s brain resembles that of a human though it cannot speak it can communicate and proves it is at least as smart as a human is. The chimp understands what anesthesia and a biopsy are after overhearing the scientists discuss it about him. The chimp goes bananas killing three of its creators and fleeing into the jungle. Jamie and a few others try to track down the runaway using radio identification technology, but remain ignorant to the true threat of the brilliant beast.------------------ Dr. Jeffrey Anderson digs into the ethical ¿Dr. Frankenstein¿ question of how far scientists should go in this case with stem cell research before they cross the line. There is plenty of action in this exciting yet chilling thriller especially the incredible vivid chase scenes in the jungle. Whereas Dr. Anderson raises the morality spectrum, he cleverly leaves it to the audience to decide right from wrong in a strong science fiction tale that sounds more like tomorrow¿s science.--------------------- Harriet Klausner