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The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale
     

The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale

3.4 11
by Joseph Conrad
 

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The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale is a novel by Joseph Conrad published in 1907. The story is set in London in 1886 and deals largely with the life of Mr. Verloc and his job as a spy. The Secret Agent is also notable as it is one of Conrad's later political novels, which move away from his typical tales of seafaring. The novel deals broadly with the notions of anarchism

Overview

The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale is a novel by Joseph Conrad published in 1907. The story is set in London in 1886 and deals largely with the life of Mr. Verloc and his job as a spy. The Secret Agent is also notable as it is one of Conrad's later political novels, which move away from his typical tales of seafaring. The novel deals broadly with the notions of anarchism, espionage, and terrorism. It portrays anarchist or revolutionary groups before many of the social uprisings of the twentieth century. However, it also deals with exploitation, particularly with regard to Verloc's relationship with his brother-in-law Stevie.

Because of its terrorist theme, The Secret Agent was noted as "one of the three works of literature most cited in the American media" around two weeks after 11 September 2001. The Secret Agent was ranked the 46th best novel of the 20th century by Modern Library.

This work has been formatted for your NOOK.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940148195863
Publisher:
Bronson Tweed Publishing
Publication date:
02/25/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
268 KB

Meet the Author

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) grew up amid political unrest in Russian-occupied Poland. After twenty years at sea with the French and British merchant navies, he settled in England in 1894. Over the next three decades he revolutionized the English novel with books such as Typhoon, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and especially Heart of Darkness, his best-known and most influential work.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 3, 1857
Date of Death:
August 3, 1924
Place of Birth:
Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia
Place of Death:
Bishopsbourne, Kent, England
Education:
Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Jenni_Wickham More than 1 year ago
This is a superb seminal work well deserving of its iconic status.  The characters are so deeply cast that the writer draws you in and you actually feel their emotions.  The scenery of London in the era is exquisitely detailed  that the picture forms in your mind like from an artist's brush stroke with every sentence.  The socio political environment of the era is explored and explained in amazing detail from various viewpoints - that of the socialist-labour movement, that of the anarchists, that of the foreign (Russian and French) revolutionaries and diplomats trying to unsettle and overthrow the capitalist fabric; and then its impact on the ordinary citizens. The beginning of the story is bright and cheerful - sometimes portrayed with a kind of Dickensian humour - with The Secret Agent, an anarchist, living a contented and delicately balanced life in his shop in Soho in London with his wife, mother-in-law, and half witted brother-in-law. The tensions in the household is subtly introduced with the wife trying her best to weave the brother she loves deeply and the other into the affections of her husband on whom they are all dependent.  Then a call to a meeting by the russian born Controller of the Secret Agent acts as a catalyst that unsettles the fragile peace.  From then on a series of panicked and desperate actions exposing the dark side of the characters, the fabric of the family falls apart with each chapter until the tragic end. The ending is definitely unsatisfactory.  I innocent are wronged and driven to death and the opportunistic prosper from it.  I cannot help but wish for a happier ending, though I realize that this may have well been the way things might have gone had the characters lived in the era in real life. The third person omniscient POV is a little weird, but that was the norm of good writing in the era.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The characters are descri ed in such loquatious detail right from the start that i was lost after 10pages as to who was who and had read nothing of the plot. Couldnt go any further and had to stop.
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!
Manirul More than 1 year ago
Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A slow story with an abrupt morality-tale ending. Not worth rereading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oh. Then. Well. Thanks for telling me that. X.x
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Huh. That's kinda like me with this one dude. Meh, I didn't even know Umbreo had gold eyes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
No, but Goldthunder does. X.x