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The Secret Life of Genius: How 24 Great Men and Women Were Touched by Spiritual Worlds

Overview

A look at the metaphysical experiences that shaped the lives and work of 24 great men and women from the Renaissance to modern times

• Chronicles the changing relationship with God, nature, and spirituality from the 16th century to the 20th century

• Includes encounters with the paranormal of Ben Johnson, Isaac Newton, Mary Shelley, Leo Tolstoy, Doris Lessing, and Winston Churchill

What role did the esoteric thought of Swedenborg play in the creative output of Honoré de Balzac? ...

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The Secret Life of Genius: How 24 Great Men and Women Were Touched by Spiritual Worlds

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Overview

A look at the metaphysical experiences that shaped the lives and work of 24 great men and women from the Renaissance to modern times

• Chronicles the changing relationship with God, nature, and spirituality from the 16th century to the 20th century

• Includes encounters with the paranormal of Ben Johnson, Isaac Newton, Mary Shelley, Leo Tolstoy, Doris Lessing, and Winston Churchill

What role did the esoteric thought of Swedenborg play in the creative output of Honoré de Balzac? Did a supernatural encounter prompt Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley to focus her work on the theme of immortality? Building on his earlier research on communications with the spirit world that Victor Hugo, author of Les Misérables, experienced while in exile on the isle of Jersey, John Chambers now looks at the role occult knowledge and supernatural experiences played in the lives of 24 geniuses. His investigation spans the life and work of William Blake, Helena Blavatsky, and W. B. Yeats, whose esoteric interests are well known, as well as those little suspected of such encounters with worlds beyond ours, including Doris Lessing, Leo Tolstoy, Norman Mailer, Yukio Mishima, and Winston Churchill.

Chambers presents more than a collection of anecdotes and newly revealed secrets. His research provides insightful historical context of the decisive turning point that took place with the collapse of Prague, the occult capital of Europe, in 1620, which resulted in the victory of Cartesian reality and Newton’s scientific paradigm over the esoteric traditions that flourished until that time. The magical and occult world shown in the lives of these 24 great men and women offers us a glimpse of what could still be ours—a world that though it is now overshadowed by modern scientific and technological principles is yet still visible on the horizon through the visions and paranormal experiences of these geniuses.

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Editorial Reviews

Frank Joseph
“John Chambers has found that the core of human genius has less to do with raw intelligence than we previously assumed. The two dozen extraordinary individuals he examines all share something in common—the application of spiritual experience to life. Chambers thereby unveils the most empowering secret available to every man and woman.”
Nexus: Colorado's Holistic Journal
"Does genius depend on only raw intelligence, or is there something beyond the mind that infuses it? Read this book and form your own opinion . . .
Richard D. Wright
"Each of the book's lively accounts starts with a key event from the person's life, moves to significant background experiences, examines other related incidents and outcomes, and often wraps up with a return to the opening segment."
Michael Grosso
“Rare and penetrating glimpses into the paranormal dimension of 24 famous artists, scientists, and politicians. From Benvenuto Cellini to Winston Churchill and Carl Jung, this book offers fresh perspectives on the achievements of greatness. Written with grace, wit, and quiet erudition—heartily recommended.”
Nexus
"Does genius depend on only raw intelligence, or is there something beyond the mind that infuses it? Read this book and form your own opinion . . . "
Colorado's Holistic Journal Nexus
"Does genius depend on only raw intelligence, or is there something beyond the mind that infuses it? Read this book and form your own opinion . . ."
author of The Lost Civilization of Lemuria and The Frank Joseph
“John Chambers has found that the core of human genius has less to do with raw intelligence than we previously assumed. The two dozen extraordinary individuals he examines all share something in common—the application of spiritual experience to life. Chambers thereby unveils the most empowering secret available to every man and woman.”
author of The Lost Civilization of Lemuria and The Frank Joseph
“John Chambers has found that the core of human genius has less to do with raw intelligence than we previously assumed. The two dozen extraordinary individuals he examines all share something in common—the application of spiritual experience to life. Chambers thereby unveils the most empowering secret available to every man and woman.”
From the Publisher
"Does genius depend on only raw intelligence, or is there something beyond the mind that infuses it? Read this book and form your own opinion . . . "

"Each of the book's lively accounts starts with a key event from the person's life, moves to significant background experiences, examines other related incidents and outcomes, and often wraps up with a return to the opening segment."

“John Chambers has found that the core of human genius has less to do with raw intelligence than we previously assumed. The two dozen extraordinary individuals he examines all share something in common—the application of spiritual experience to life. Chambers thereby unveils the most empowering secret available to every man and woman.”

“Rare and penetrating glimpses into the paranormal dimension of 24 famous artists, scientists, and politicians. From Benvenuto Cellini to Winston Churchill and Carl Jung, this book offers fresh perspectives on the achievements of greatness. Written with grace, wit, and quiet erudition—heartily recommended.”

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594772726
  • Publisher: Inner Traditions/Bear & Company
  • Publication date: 7/28/2009
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 974,564
  • Product dimensions: 6.08 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.79 (d)

Meet the Author

John Chambers is the author of Victor Hugo’s Conversations with the Spirit World and has contributed essays to Forbidden Religion: Suppressed Heresies of the West. He lives in northern California.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter Eight
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
(1797-1851)

The Last Man

The silence is piercing. Between the vacant brownstones, tall grass pokes from cracks in the deserted streets. In the shadows cast by skyscrapers across the avenues, gigantic heaps of rusting cars peer blindly at the sky.
This is New York. A single automobile hurtles down a deserted street. It’s driven by actor Will Smith. Beside him on the seat lies an automatic rifle, and alongside that sits a huge brown dog. The dog is Smith’s sole companion. Everybody else in the city—probably the world—is dead. Plague has decimated the planet.
Smith’s face is numb with despair, his eyes dull with pain. He must get home. Ravenous dead-eyed vampiric mutants, once human beings, roam the streets zombie-like at night. Smith is one of earth’s leading scientists—perhaps the only one alive—working night and day, in an apartment protected by storm shutters, to develop a vaccine that will defeat the plague. He’s alive because of experiments he conducted when the plague first broke out. But it probably doesn’t matter whether he succeeds.
He is the last man.
We are watching I Am Legend, the 2007 blockbuster science-fiction film, but it is not the first movie to tell this story. In The Omega Man, released in 1970, Charlton Heston was the overwhelmed protagonist wandering the deserted streets. In The Last Man on Earth, made in Rome in 1964, Vincent Price was the physically and spiritually exhausted sole survivor. According to most of the documentation, all three of these films were based on the deeply pessimistic 1954 novel I Am Legend by science-fiction writer Richard Matheson. But actually the pedigree of this apocalyptic story lately reanimated by Will Smith goes back much farther than that. I Am Legend is based on the novel The Last Man, published in 1826 and written by Mary Wollstonecraft
Shelley, also the author of the perennially popular novel (re-created in many films as well) Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus, first published in 1818.
The movie I Am Legend has a “Hollywood” ending: the scientistprotagonist discovers there are other survivors on earth and finds a cure for the plague. But, as Mary Shelley’s The Last Man draws to a close in the year 2100, it seems increasingly certain that Shelley’s last man, Lionel Verney, will not be so lucky. The plague in The Last Man, never identified, and apparently coming from the regions of the Nile, has killed everyone in England except Verney. He has become convinced that it has killed everyone in Europe; as he sets out in a one-man boat from the east coast of Italy in hopes of finding survivors in India, he seems to tell us, in the last paragraph of the novel, that he expects to be voyaging for as long as he is alive, seen only by the eye of God:

Thus around the shores of deserted earth, while the sun is high, and the moon waxes or wanes, angels, the spirits of the dead, and the ever-open eye of the Supreme, will behold the tiny bark, freighted with Verney—the LAST MAN.

Mary Shelley often seems to us to have been remarkably prophetic. In The Last Man she writes about a king of England who abdicated and became the earl of Windsor; something very like this happened in 1938 when King Edward VIII of England abdicated and became the duke of Windsor to marry a commoner, Wallis Simpson. Two of Shelley’s short stories deal with frozen corpses from ancient times; in 1984, the body of Lindow Man (died about AD 300) was discovered in a peat bog in England, and in 1991 that of Otzi the Iceman (died about 3300 BC) was found in the Alps. Shelley scholar Mary Devlin tells us: “Maurice, or the Fisher’s Cot, one of Mary’s private manuscripts, was discovered only a few years ago and published in 1998. It deals with issues which are in the news today: missing children and animal rights.”
Most of us know that Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein and married Percy Bysshe Shelley, one of the greatest poets of England’s Romantic era. But exactly who was this extraordinary woman who, living in an age when women were hardly allowed to express themselves, wrote with such skill and varied imagination and saw with such chilling insight into the apocalyptic future of humankind?

Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley was the daughter of William Godwin (1756-1836), author of the revolutionary social tract Political Justice, and Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), virtually the founder of the women’s rights movement because of her trail-blazing, still-popular book The Vindication of the Rights of Women. Both of Mary Shelley’s parents had a decisive impact on their times, though often through the influence of William Godwin’s devoted disciples; these latter, who often gathered at his house, included Robert Southey, Thomas De Quincey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and the renowned scientist Sir Humphrey Davy, among many others.
Ten days after Mary was born, her mother died. William Godwin, an emotionally aloof husband who was always preoccupied with his work, was now a single parent. He adored his daughter but found it burdensome to raise her on his own. In 1801 he eased the burden by taking a second wife.
But Godwin insisted that Mary be schooled at home. It had quickly become evident that she was precociously brilliant. Her father allowed her to attend the very frequent nighttime meetings—sometimes two or three a week—that took place in his living room. Here, his gifted disciples held forth on a wide range of subjects that included spiritualism and the occult. It was quite an education for Mary. She was soon receiving instruction from, and being carefully listened to by, the most brilliantly imaginative and well-informed literary and scientific figures of the time.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Prague’s Other Universe

1 Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1571)
The Goldsmith and the Guardian Angel

2 Michel de Nostradamus (1503-1566)
The Art of Astral Medicine

3
Ben Jonson (1572-1637)
The Occult as Confidence Game

4 Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727)
In Search of the Historical Noah

5 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)
The Battle Over Light

6 William Blake (1757-1827)
The Horse’s Mouth

7 Alphonse de Lamartine (1790-1869)
The Fall of an Angel

8 Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797-1851)
The Last Man

9 Honoré de Balzac (1799-1850)
Triumph and Tragedy of the Inner Self

10 Victor Hugo (1802-1885)
What the Shadow’s Mouth Says

11 Jules Verne (1828-1905)
The Prophet as Peter Pan

12 Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)
The Fruits of Enlightenment

13 Madame Helena Blavatsky (1831-1891)
Mistress of Hidden Wisdom

14 William Butler Yeats (1865-1939)
Metaphors for Poetry

15 H. G. Wells (1866-1946)
Did the Father of Science Fiction Have a Near-Death Experience?

16 Thomas Mann (1871-1950)
“It Was Not Possible—But It Happened”

17 Harry Houdini (1874-1926)
Ultimate Escape

18 Winston S. Churchill (1874-1965)
Encounter in the Transvaal

19 Carl G. Jung (1875-1961)
Speaker for the Dead

20 Sri Yashoda Ma (1882–1944)
A Guest in the House of Krishna

21 Doris Lessing (1919-)
Canopus in Argos: Archives

22 Norman Mailer (1923-2007)
Boxing with the Devil

23 Yukio Mishima (1925-1970)
Martyr-Genius of Japan

24 James Merrill (1926-1995)
I and Mine Hold It Back Brothers

Notes

Bibliography

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