The Secret Man: The Story of Watergate's Deep Throat

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Overview

"In Washington, D.C., where little stays secret for long, the identity of Deep Throat - the mysterious source who helped Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein break open the Watergate scandal in 1972 - remained hidden for 33 years. Now, Woodward tells the story of his long, complex relationship with W. Mark Felt, the enigmatic former No. 2 man in the Federal Bureau of Investigation who helped end the presidency of Richard Nixon." "The Secret Man chronicles the story in intimate detail, from Woodward's first, chance encounter with Felt in the Nixon White House, to their covert, middle-of-the-night meetings in an underground parking garage, to the aftermath of Watergate and decades beyond, until Felt finally stepped forward at age 91 to unmask himself as Deep Throat." "In this volume, part memoir, part morality tale, part political and journalistic history, Woodward provides context and detail about The Washington Post's expose of Watergate. He examines his later tense relationship with Felt, when the FBI man stood charged with authorizing FBI burglaries. (Not knowing Felt's secret role in the demise of his own presidency, Nixon testified at Felt's trial, and Ronald Reagan later pardoned him.) Woodward lays bare his own personal struggles as he tries to define his relationship, his obligations, and his gratitude to this extraordinary confidential source." The Secret Man is an intense, 33-year journey, providing a one-of-a-kind study of trust, deception, pressures, alliances, doubts and a lifetime of secrets. Woodward has spent more than three decades asking himself why Mark Felt became Deep Throat. Now the world can see what happened and why, brining to a close one of the last chapters of Watergate.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
At long last, the secret inside story of Watergate and Deep Throat is revealed -- by the famed Washington Post duo of Woodward and Bernstein, who broke the story that brought down a president.
Christopher Hitchens
… the penultimate chapter, in which [Woodward] explains his adamant position on the protection of sources, is a passage that one hopes will be taught in schools.
— The New York Times
Bill Emmott
If you have promised an informant that his identity will remain a secret, how could you look yourself in the mirror if you then break that promise? The mirrors in the houses of Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein and the others who kept the secret of Deep Throat for so long are safely still in regular use. As The Secret Man shows, history has been the loser from such fealty, for it has been deprived of a full, personal explanation by Mark Felt. But that was his choice. And both morality and journalism can be counted as winners.
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Now that the Watergate scandal source, Deep Throat, has decided to step forward (or at least Mark Felt's family has), this audiobook serves as the final chapter of the saga Woodward and Carl Bernstein began with All the President's Men. Boyd Gaines has a tough job as reader. Retelling a tale that was so memorably and, as it turns out, accurately portrayed by Robert Redford and Hal Holbrook on film is a daunting task. But Gaines rises to the occasion with aplomb. His rendition of Woodward is authoritative yet humble and delivered with a confident crispness. His take on Felt's voice is also strong, and it is interesting to hear Felt's digression into the less complimentary mannerisms of old age. Gaines's version of the older, forgetful Felt sounds a bit like his Richard Nixon, with a pinch of John Wayne thrown in the mix. Overall, The Secret Man is a historically informative and enjoyable listening experience that also speaks to the current issue of journalism and the protection of sources. Simultaneous release with the S&S hardcover. (July) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Provocative. . . . Reaffirms the vital role that confidential sources play in keeping the public informed." — The New York Times

"The Secret Man is one of the best [of the Watergate books] at illuminating the backstage battle to bring President Nixon's team to account. . . . Eye-opening." — The Boston Globe

"The best short discussion of the distinction — between the reporter as private eye and the reporter as stenographer — that has ever been published. The chapter on the protection of sources is a passage that one hopes will be taught in schools." — The New York Times Book Review

"Long live the use of confidential news sources. . . . An inside look at the give-and-take involved in the often-dicey relationships between journalists and their sources." — Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

"A filling-in of many of the final blanks left in the most explosive political/journalism story ever." — Lincoln Journal Star

"A provocative, even stirring contribution." — Baltimore Sun

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743287159
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 7/6/2005
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Bob Woodward

Bob Woodward is an associate editor at The Washington Post, where he has worked for forty-one years. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for The Washington Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal, and later for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He has authored or coauthored twelve #1 national nonfiction bestsellers. He has two daughters, Tali and Diana, and lives in Washington, DC, with his wife, writer Elsa Walsh.

Biography

Perhaps the only journalist who can claim to feature both Judy Belushi and Ronald and Nancy Reagan on his list of enemies, Washington Post editor and Watergate watchdog Bob Woodward is famously (purposefully?) a lightning rod for criticism. Woodward raises as many eyebrows for his anonymous sourcing as he summons applause for his scorched-earth approach in interviewing masses of people for every project; the extensive information he digs up is held in awe, yet greetings from the nation's book critics and journalists don't always read like love letters. Joan Didion, in the pages of The New York Review of Books called The Choice, his account of the 1996 presidential campaign, "political pornography."

The New Republic opened its review of The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House by pleading with readers not to buy the book. Frank Rich, the opinion columnist for The New York Times, said that Woodward's book Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate should have instead been entitled All the Presidents Stink, since none of the nation's post-Watergate presidents seemed able to withstand the author's tut-tutting over minor peccadilloes.

For the record, Judy Belushi objected to what she called Woodward's overly negative portrait of husband John's drug use and lifestyle excesses in the 1984 biography Wired, and the Reagans didn't like what he had to say about deceased CIA Director William Casey in Veil.

Still, Woodward delivers the goods.

On the job for nine months as a night cops reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Woodward lucked into the petty crime of the century: the break-in at Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate complex. Woodward and reporter Carl Bernstein's investigation reached the highest levels of the Nixon White House, and has become a template for investigative journalism ever since. Thousands of students have poured out of journalism schools in the ensuing years -- for better or worse -- sniffing the winds for their own private Watergate.

Woodward himself hasn't found it, but he has maintained a reputation as the investigator within American journalism, often winning unparalleled access to his subjects and developing a reputation for almost manic multiple-fact-checking of information. After turning the Watergate story into the book and film All the President's Men, Woodward and Bernstein -- or "Woodstein," as they became known in the Post's newsroom -- collaborated on a second book, The Final Days, a look at the end of the Nixon presidency. In 1979, Woodward cast his glance around Washington and found The Brethren, an inside look at the inner workings of the Supreme Court, this time with co-author Scott Armstrong.

Aside from the Belushi biography, Woodward has stuck to the political. He went inside the Clinton White House with The Agenda, inside the CIA with Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA, 1981-1987 (raising questions about his mysterious hospital interview with a groggy Bill Casey) and inside the 1996 Clinton-Dole duel for the presidency in The Choice.

Woodward is the only author to publish four books on a sitting president during the president's time in office. He spent more time than any other journalist or author interviewing President Bush on the record -- a total of nearly 11 hours in six separate sessions from 2001 to 2008.

His four books on President George W. Bush are Bush at War (2002), about the response to 9/11 and the initial invasion of Afghanistan; Plan of Attack (2004), on how and why Bush decided to invade Iraq; State of Denial (2006), about Bush's refusal to acknowledge for nearly three years that the Iraq war was not going well as violence and instability reached staggering levels; and The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008 (2008), about the deep divisions and misunderstandings on war strategy between the civilians and the military as the president finally decided to add 30,000 troops in a surge.

In every case, Woodward digs deep. And it all started when he was a teenager, working one summer as a janitor in his father's law office in Wheaton, Ill. He made his way through the papers in his father's desk, his father's partner's desk and the files in the attic.

"I looked up all my classmates and their families, and there were IRS audits or divorces or grand juries that did not lead to indictment," he told U.S. News and World Report in 2002. "It was a cold shower to see that the disposed files contained the secret lives of many of the people in this perfect town and showed they weren't perfect."

Good To Know

Richard Nixon said his wife, Pat, had a stroke while reading the Woodward and Bernstein book Final Days.

Woodward once briefly dated reporter Leslie Stahl, who also covered the Watergate story, even to the point of following John Dean into a men's room to continue questioning him.

He voted for Richard Nixon.
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    1. Hometown:
      Washington, D.C.
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 26, 1943
    2. Place of Birth:
      Geneva, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., Yale University, 1965

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

In february 1992, as the 20th anniversary of the Watergate break-in approached, I went to the fortress-like J. Edgar Hoover FBI headquarters building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. An imposing cement structure with large dark windows, the Hoover building sits appropriately about midway between the White House and the Capitol. It is as if Hoover, the founding director and the embodiment of the FBI from 1924 to 1972, is still present in Washington, D.C., playing off presidents against the Congress. I navigated the labyrinth of security and finally made my way to the documents room. I had come to examine some of the FBI's investigative Watergate files that had been opened to the public. Private cubicles are available in the classy, law-firm atmosphere, well lit, all done in high-quality wood paneling well above the standard government issue. The room is quiet. I was offered blue-lined paper to take notes.

The Watergate files contain hundreds of internal FBI memos, requests for action, investigative summaries, and Teletypes to headquarters from field offices which had conducted hundreds of interviews. There were the first summaries of information on the five burglars arrested in the Democrats' Watergate office building headquarters: their names, their backgrounds, their CIA connections, and their contacts with E. Howard Hunt Jr., the former CIA operative and White House consultant, and G. Gordon Liddy, the former FBI agent. The files teemed with notes, routing slips and queries bearing initials from senior Bureau officials, dates and intelligence classifications.

The outline of the Watergate cover-up was so clear in retrospect. White House counsel John W. Dean III, who later confessed to leading the illegal obstruction of justice on behalf of President Richard Nixon, "stated all requests for investigation by FBI at White House must be cleared through him," according to a summary dated six days after the June 17, 1972, break-in.

A memo on October 10, 1972, addressed The Washington Post story that Carl Bernstein and I had written that day. It was probably our most important story; it reported that the Watergate break-in was not an isolated event but "stemmed from a massive campaign of political spying and sabotage" run by the White House and President Nixon's reelection committee. The two-page memo stated that the FBI had learned that Donald H. Segretti, who headed the efforts to harass Democratic presidential candidates, had been hired by Dwight L. Chapin, the president's appointments secretary, and paid by Herbert W. Kalmbach, the president's personal lawyer. Because there was no direct connection to the Watergate bugging, the memo said, the FBI had not pursued the matter.

I smiled. Here were two of the reasons the Watergate cover-up had worked at first: Dean's effectiveness in squelching further inquiry; and the seeming utter lack of imagination on the part of the FBI.

All of this was a pleasant, long, well-documented reminder of names, events and emotions as I sifted through the Bureau memos, as best I could tell almost a complete set of internal memos and investigative files. The files and memos provided a kind of intimacy with what had been four intense years of my life, as Carl Bernstein and I covered the story for The Washington Post and wrote two books about Watergate: All the President's Men, published in 1974, which was about our newspaper's investigation; and The Final Days, published in 1976, which chronicled the collapse of the Nixon presidency.

At the time of my visit I was 48 years old, but I was not there for a trip down memory lane. I was not hunting for more information in the rich history of Watergate; not looking for new avenues, leads, surprises, contradictions, unrevealed crimes or hidden meaning, although the amazements of Watergate rarely ceased.

Instead, I was really there in further pursuit of Deep Throat...

Copyright © 2005 by Bob Woodward

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2006

    Good, but nothing new here.

    Let me first say that I'm a huge Watergate buff, and I have been enthralled since I was a teenager with the greatest political scandal that the United States has ever known. With that said, anything that I can read, watch, or listen to about the era, I enjoy immensely and completely devour. Bob Woodward is also one of my favorite authors, and I've read most of his books, so all the above criteria accounts for the three star rating. Unfortunately, there is nothing new to offer in this book. Most of it is a rehash of material that is long familiar to students of the scandal. There was so much media attention last year when Deep Throat was unmasked in Vanity Fair that most of what Woodward details here, I have already read in newspaper accounts and coverage last spring. Woodward was beaten on his own story here which is a shame, because I think if he was able to disclose Deep Throat's identity, in a book before anyone else did, it would have been spellbinding. Instead, in today's media world the book seems unneccessary. I will always read every Woodward book that he puts out there, but there is really nothing worth discovering here.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2005

    good book, but...

    It's clear that Woodward's relationship with Mr. Felt was strained for so many years. As a working journalist, I thought Woodward played loose with his source, all but identifying him during his original reporting (mentioned FBI sources led the White House to focus on Felt as Deep Throat). That aside, this could have been a lengthy magazine article instead of a book. Still, a good read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2005

    A Period to All the President's Men

    I am being generous when I give Woodward's latest money-maker a 3-star rating. My gut feeling puts it in the 2-star group! It was extremely disappointing and over hyped. Mr. Berstein added little. But hey, it made them money and that is what counts. Once Mark Felt was officially acknowledged as 'Deep Throat' in 'Vanity Fair', that put a period on the Nixon White House era. I am sure Woodward felt (no pun intended) betrayed. It was his(and Felt's)story to be told. Problem was, there wasn't much left to be told, only a name, and Vanity Fair said it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2005

    A Must-Read!

    Author and veteran reporter Bob Woodward ends this book by saying, 'There never is a final draft of history.' Perhaps, but his book turns the page on an era and on Deep Throat - the code name for FBI official W. Mark Felt - the pivotal secret source for the Watergate stories that helped bring down Richard Nixon's presidency. Remarkably, Woodward and his Washington Post colleagues protected their source's identity for more than 30 years. Woodward paints a compelling portrait of his almost tortured relationship with Felt, a father figure and mentor. Several times Felt came a hair's breadth from being exposed. Pained, Woodward admits that he missed his chance to uncover Felt's motivations for abetting the Post's investigative crusade. By the time Woodward tried to reconcile their troubled relationship, Felt was 87 and dementia had twisted his memory. Yet, Felt triumphed in his historic clash with Nixon. Woodward concludes, 'By surviving and enduring his hidden life...in his own way, W. Mark Felt won.' Carl Bernstein's epilogue, 'A Reporter's Assessment,' is an equally fascinating contribution. We most highly recommend this book, especially for those seeking a better understanding of the Watergate participants, whose actions will continue to ripple the waters of American politics for many years to come.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2005

    A Great Final Chapter

    Like a final wrap up episode of a television series, The Secret Man is a satisfying coda for All The President's Men & The Final Days. This book addressed many unanswered questions on a story that has come full circle. Woodward, Bernstein & Felt are true American heroes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2005

    An American Hero

    Mark Felt is a true American hero.The next time a book about 'Profiles in Courage' is written, there should be a chapter devoted to him. He put a stop to Presidental abuse of power and corruption of the intelligence agencies that was being done by a handful of corrupt people.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2005

    A Deep Disappointment

    I read the Washington Post article by Bob Woodward that appeared shortly after reading the Vanity Fair article revealing that Mark Felt was Deep Throat. I should have stopped there and not purchased this book because it offers no insights beyond the two articles. Too bad no one has discovered a version of the Deep Throat story written by Mark Felt prior to his memory loss or that Mr Woodward did not seek an earlier reconciliation and collaboration.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2005

    interesting

    i like the thoughts and topics,very alive and not very boring at all.i also like its title at first which bougt me to its main messages and story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2005

    recalling old days

    It was an okay read. Deep Throat had already lost his memories, and that was, probably, good. That part of America is history and is where it belongs. This book didn't revel much that intellingent people knew. trying to make a good buck! nothing wrong with that. another movie?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2005

    Great Read - details finally here for us all!

    If you lived through Watergate - this is a must read. If you are too young to have known Watergate but have watched the movie - All The President's Men and are facinated that THIS REALLY happened in America - you will like this book as well. If you know nothing about Watergate - YOU NEED TO KNOW what happend and how it was such an accident that these 2 tallented young Wash. Post cub reporters uncovered the most derelict Presidency event in probably all the KNOWN history of the White House. For those of us who lived through this major political event - we are all glad now to finally have the answer about who Deep Throat was before 'we died!' My poor dad did not live to know who it was - he wanted to know so badly - but he always held out that it HAD to be someone high up in the FBI and was firmly convinced that is the only person that could have gotten away with being Deep Throat - anyone else was too much of a target - or involved in the cover up itself. Dad, you got it right! More then a great summer read - everyone should have this one on their library shelf to complete the picture of what happened in-between the pages of what we have known about for years.

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