Secret Missions: A Novel

Secret Missions: A Novel

4.0 1
by Michael V. Gannon
     
 

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The author of Operation Drumbeat turns his hand to fiction in this World War II espionage thriller about a Nazi agent who slips into Florida searching for vital information about the capabilities of U.S. fighters and bombers.

Overview

The author of Operation Drumbeat turns his hand to fiction in this World War II espionage thriller about a Nazi agent who slips into Florida searching for vital information about the capabilities of U.S. fighters and bombers.

Editorial Reviews

Denise Perry Donavin
While researching "Operation Drumbeat" (1990), a nonfiction book about World War II German U-boat attacks on the American coast, Gannon gathered much of the material used in this novel about a German spy who is dropped by a U-boat near St. Augustine, Florida. Peter Krug is a ruthless agent disguised as a traveling artist from the Midwest who gathers information about American military planes and disguises it under the watercolors he paints. When Peter is unmasked, he murders the woman responsible. At this point the plot thickens and Krug tangles with an ambitious aviatrix and a Catholic priest. Within this exciting espionage tale, Gannon manages an intriguing look at female military pilots and at the politics of the Catholic Church during World War II.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060177331
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/1994
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
320

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Secret Missions 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is very good at setting the scene of the early stages of World War II around January 1942. The main character Peter Krug is a German spy that undertakes a one man commando operation to get operational and flight performance data on U.S. aircraft at the airbases scattered across Northern Florida. His goal is to get the information back to the high command of the German Luftwaffe. In his Krug's path is a Catholic priest who becomes increasingly entangled in following Krug's trail. Gannon does a good job shifting the readers viewpoint perspective throughout the story. One minute you are at elegant party in Nazi German with Krug before the mission, then you are onboard the German UBoat dropping Krug in the Atlantic waters off Florida. Another time you are with the Father Tony DeAngelo listening to people speaking to you from behind the confessional screen. The ending was suspenseful but a little too much as the priest rams Krug's boat near the rendevous point with the UBoat. After a struggle, Krug defends himself with a knife that happens to kill the attacking Krug. It was a great book but just that cartoonish ending was why I didn't give it five stars.