The Secret Sharer

The Secret Sharer

3.5 4
by Joseph Conrad
     
 

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The Secret Sharer is a short story by Joseph Conrad written in 1909, first published in Harper's Magazine in 1910, and as a book in the short-story collection Twixt Land and Sea (1912).
The story was filmed as a segment of the 1952 film Face to Face. A new film, Secret Sharer, inspired by the novella and directed by Peter Fudakowski, was released in the UK in June…  See more details below

Overview

The Secret Sharer is a short story by Joseph Conrad written in 1909, first published in Harper's Magazine in 1910, and as a book in the short-story collection Twixt Land and Sea (1912).
The story was filmed as a segment of the 1952 film Face to Face. A new film, Secret Sharer, inspired by the novella and directed by Peter Fudakowski, was released in the UK in June 2014.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780557672417
Publisher:
Lulu.com
Publication date:
09/11/2010
Sold by:
LULU PRESS
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
345 KB

Meet the Author

Joseph Conrad (3 December 1857 - 3 August 1924) was a Polish author who wrote in English after settling in England. He was granted British nationality in 1886, but always considered himself a Pole. Conrad is regarded as one of the greatest novelists in English, though he did not speak the language fluently until he was in his twenties (and always with a marked accent). He wrote stories and novels, often with a nautical setting, that depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of an indifferent universe. He was a master prose stylist who brought a distinctly non-English tragic sensibility into English literature.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 3, 1857
Date of Death:
August 3, 1924
Place of Birth:
Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia
Place of Death:
Bishopsbourne, Kent, England
Education:
Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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The Secret Sharer (Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism Series) 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
JWhitewater More than 1 year ago
Conrad is one of the best English storytellers ever, and this is no exception
Filomena Ayala More than 1 year ago
Blank book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One reading of 'The Secret Sharer' will absolutely not do justice to the story being told. For, far more important (and to some, myself, for one, interesting) than the literal story of a young captain who comes in contact with and harbors a fugitive sailor is the psychological aspect which may not be noticed on just the first reading. The Captain (who's only been on the ship for a short while) is faced with the conflict of his youthful passiveness and taking command as a leader. This inner struggle gives way to the birth (or rather, emergence) of his counterpart, Leggatt (in Freudian terms, the representative of the Id.) Throughout the story we see as the Captain struggles with hiding Leggatt from the eyes of anyone, to 'protect him' from being caught and facing punishment. Also noticeable is the decay of the Captains' mental state, to the point where even he questions his sanity. Left up to the reader to discern is the actuality of Leggatts' presence. However, the evidence piles high for the argument of his being an imagined being. The Captain (whose name, interestingly is never revealed) subconsciously 'creates' Leggatt as an outlet for his worries about his nature itself. Leggatt is the 'physical' manifestation of his Id, which he does not fully understand, but as we see is quite submissive to, almost in an admiring way. The division of his mind leads to his mental instability which gets progressively worse over time. I'm not going to spoil the ending, but the conclusion leaves him a different man from when we were first introduced. The book is rich with themes, of course there's the psychological, (with the Id, Ego, Superego & the Captains hallucinations) but there's also the themes of isolation, land vs. sea, stepping up to a role and thus maturing and the philosophical question of whether or not there is a right or wrong. I really enjoyed it. PS. Read it with Fight Club in mind and you might see a few similarities.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this book was okay, i guess, but for a book that's aobut 60 pages long, it took forever!!!! it was good at times, but joseph conrad seemed to go on and on about the surrounds and i wanted to get back to the story. I really liked, however, how he wrote as if the captain and stow-away were twins. i also didn't like how he assumed that we knew everything about ships and all the slang that they used on ships. o well.