Secrets of Silicon Valley: What Everyone Else Can Learn from the Innovation Capital of the World

Secrets of Silicon Valley: What Everyone Else Can Learn from the Innovation Capital of the World

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by Deborah Perry Piscione
     
 

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While the global economy languishes, one place just keeps growing despite failing banks, uncertain markets, and high unemployment: Silicon Valley. In the last two years, more than 100 incubators have popped up there, and the number of angel investors has skyrocketed. Today, 40 percent of all venture capital investments in the United States come from Silicon Valley… See more details below

Overview

While the global economy languishes, one place just keeps growing despite failing banks, uncertain markets, and high unemployment: Silicon Valley. In the last two years, more than 100 incubators have popped up there, and the number of angel investors has skyrocketed. Today, 40 percent of all venture capital investments in the United States come from Silicon Valley firms, compared to 10 percent from New York. In Secrets of Silicon Valley, entrepreneur and media commentator Deborah Perry Piscione takes us inside this vibrant ecosystem where meritocracy rules the day. She explores Silicon Valley's exceptionally risk-tolerant culture, and why it thrives despite the many laws that make California one of the worst states in the union for business. Drawing on interviews with investors, entrepreneurs, and community leaders, as well as a host of case studies from Google to Paypal, Piscione argues that Silicon Valley's unique culture is the best hope for the future of American prosperity and the global business community and offers lessons from the Valley to inspire reform in other communities and industries, from Washington, DC to Wall Street.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When Piscione (Unfinished Business: A Democrat and a Republican Take on the 10 Most Important Issues Women Face), a former congressional and White House staffer, lobbyist, and political commentator, moved from Washington, D.C. to Silicon Valley, she experienced culture shock. Not only did she find the area welcoming, she discovered that Silicon Valley had a very distinct mindset characterized by networking, innovation, and an inimitable comfort with risk. She quickly assimilated, raising capital and launching three successful start-ups in six years. Piscione’s latest is less about how to get funding and succeed as an entrepreneur than it is about understanding how Silicon Valley ticks: the history of the area, including Stanford University’s profound influence on both technology and innovation, as well as profiles of industry leaders. The book succeeds in its mission to illustrate how Silicon Valley’s history and mindset have created an environment for success. Unfortunately, it is overly ambitious in its reach and toward the end borders on being a relocation guide, with several chapters discussing services like schools and restaurants, meeting places, and lifestyle. Nonetheless, Piscione offers a bird’s-eye view of one of the most exceptional economic ecosystems in the U.S., which is sure to interest entrepreneurs and leaders alike. Agent: Claudia Cross, Folio Literary Management. (Apr.)
Library Journal
When former congressional and White House staffer Piscione (Unfinished Business: A Democrat and a Republican Take on the 10 Most Important Issues Women Face) left her life in politics for the start-up community in Silicon Valley, she experienced culture shock that inspired her to write a cultural history of the companies and people south of the San Francisco Bay. The book’s early chapters explain how Stanford University and the development of semiconductors and the silicon chip industries attracted a more innovative type of company to the area. A solid portion of the work is devoted to exploring the entrepreneurial spirit of these businesses, with one chapter dedicated to the important venture capital firms that came out of Sand Hill Road. The author ends with an epilog that amplifies her main discovery: there is no way to replicate the culture of Silicon Valley.

Verdict Piscione’s focus on neighborhoods, tech celebrities, and popular restaurants limits the audience and may confuse those looking for insights into innovation. Readers might look to Robert X. Cringely’s Accidental Empires: How the Boys of Silicon Valley Make Their Millions, Battle Foreign Competition, and Still Can’t Get a Date for more industry history.—John Rodzvilla, Emerson Coll., Boston
(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781137324214
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
04/02/2013
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
File size:
2 MB

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