Secrets of the Moneylab: How Behavioral Economics Can Improve Your Business

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Overview

Popular books on behavioral economics such as Predictably Irrational and Nudge have shown us that people aren't rational. But irrational doesn't mean irregular: in fact, modern science has shown time and again that our behavior, strange as it sometimes seems, follows predictable patterns. Just as the physical world is governed by gravity, electromagnetism, and other invisible forces, so human behavior is guided by a set of forces that we can't see but whose evidence is all ...

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Secrets of the Moneylab: How Behavioral Economics Can Improve Your Business

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Overview

Popular books on behavioral economics such as Predictably Irrational and Nudge have shown us that people aren't rational. But irrational doesn't mean irregular: in fact, modern science has shown time and again that our behavior, strange as it sometimes seems, follows predictable patterns. Just as the physical world is governed by gravity, electromagnetism, and other invisible forces, so human behavior is guided by a set of forces that we can't see but whose evidence is all around us.

Now a pioneering Hewlett-Packard economist describes fascinating experiments into human behavior and offers practical lessons being put to use right now at HP and other leading companies. Using examples as timely as the auto industry bailout, it tackles key issues such as:

  • How managers can use incentives to encourage employees, suppliers, and buyers to take on more risk in line with the company's goals
  • How to reduce the negative effects of irrationality on the part of employees and customers by paying attention to patterns in decision making-even when they don't, at first glance, make sense.
  • How to take advantage of the human tendency to game the system and skirt the rules to their own benefit.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Behavioral economics remains all the rage in business literature, and Chen (lead economist, HP Labs) and freelance writer Krakovsky are the latest to try and capitalize on the subject's trendiness. By describing experiments currently being done at HP Labs, the authors explore how some unexpected findings about people's expectations of fairness, reciprocity, reputation, and trust can be used by companies to better understand the sometimes irrational behaviors of their customers and clients. Although interesting and an easy read, this nonetheless covers well-trod ground—see, e.g., Dan Ariely's Predictably Irrational, Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein's Nudge, Peter A. Ubel's Free Market Madness, and Ori Brafman and Rom Brafman's Sway.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596595347
  • Publisher: Gildan Audio
  • Publication date: 12/14/2010
  • Format: CD
  • Pages: 8
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 5.75 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Kay-Yut Chen leads Hewlett Packard's experimental economics lab-the first such lab at any company-which he established in 1994 immediately after earning his Ph.D. from Caltech. His research has been used in HP's Consumer Business Organization, Procurement, and several organizations in the printer division. His laboratory designed part of the standard contract between Hewlett-Packard and U.S. retailers like Wal-mart and Best Buy. His work has been featured in Scientific American, Risk Magazine, Newsweek, Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek.com, and Portfolio.com.

Marina Krakovsky is a journalist who frequently writes on topics at the intersection of science and business. Her credits include Scientific American, Slate, Discover, Psychology Today, O, The Oprah Magazine, The Washington Post, and The New York Times Magazine.

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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2012

    Derrick

    *puts her down*

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    Ggt

    Ggg

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