Sector 7

( 7 )

Overview

Only the person who gave us Tuesday could have devised this fantastic Caldecott Honor-winning tale, which begins with a school trip to the Empire State Building. There a boy makes friends with a mischievous little cloud, who whisks him away to the Cloud Dispatch Center for Sector 7 (the region that includes New York City). The clouds are bored with their everyday shapes, so the boy obligingly starts to sketch some new ones. . . . The wordless yet eloquent account of this unparalleled adventure is a ...

See more details below
Hardcover (Library Binding)
$16.19
BN.com price
(Save 10%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (64) from $1.99   
  • New (18) from $8.99   
  • Used (46) from $1.99   

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK Kids for iPad

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (NOOK Kids)
$16.00
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

Only the person who gave us Tuesday could have devised this fantastic Caldecott Honor-winning tale, which begins with a school trip to the Empire State Building. There a boy makes friends with a mischievous little cloud, who whisks him away to the Cloud Dispatch Center for Sector 7 (the region that includes New York City). The clouds are bored with their everyday shapes, so the boy obligingly starts to sketch some new ones. . . . The wordless yet eloquent account of this unparalleled adventure is a funny, touching story about art, friendship, and the weather, as well as a visual tour de force.

The class bully makes fun of Billy Jones for drawing cows, but Billy gets the last laugh when no one believes the bully's story about talking cows, and a fiddle-playing cat with a talking spoon.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Although Wiesner's latest picture-book fantasy appears at first to be wordless, it actually has some words that are quite important. On a class trip to the Empire State Building, a boy who likes to draw is approached by a friendly cloud who takes him to Sector 7, a "terminal" reminiscent of a train station in the sky, where clouds form according to blueprints drawn up by grumpy, unimaginative humans. It seems the clouds are itching for a makeover, and the boy, pencil and paper in hand, gives it to them. Because words such as terminal, arrivals, and assignment station, which appear on signs in the pictures, are necessary to establish the scene in some instances, younger children may need adult help with the book. But the clever sometimes overlapping illustrations are wonderful: strong and precise, they range from detailed, realistic renderings of places and human characters to pictures of fluffy clouds, at once diaphanous and substantial, complete with expressive faces, and fat, fascinating four-fingered hands. A book for somewhat older children than the ones who "read" books by John Goodall and his ilk, but a good choice for getting the imagination to work." Booklist, ALA

"Finding shapes in the clouds is a grand pastime on a lazy day. But what makes those shapes anyway? and what if you had the power to alter them, to create new forms and details when amorphous arrangements are the norm? In a fittingly wordless book, this is exactly what happens to one young boy on a field trip to the top of the Empire State Building-where anything can happen, if movies are to be believed. This time, as the building is veiled in mist, a friendly cloud appears to the boy and after a few playful moments takes him on a tour of Sector 7, a factory-like satellite where clouds are shaped, classified, and distributed. The structure is like a Victorian railroad station with signs noting arrival and departure times, but tubes shaped like large funnels, not tracks, disperse the clouds to their assigned locations. The organization is hierarchical, regimented, and traditional. Perhaps that is why the playful cloud interjects a new element-a boy with imagination who can draw. And draw he does, fantastic shapes of sea life that confound the regular staff members who do not appreciate his artistry. Expelled for insubordina-tion, he is sent via cloud-carrier back to the Empire State Building just in time to rejoin his schoolmates for the return trip. But there is a different aura about him, and the clouds he inspired are amazing onlookers-much to the consternation of Sector 7! As with all wordless books, individual readers will supply the "text"; consequently, interpretations of exactly what's going on may differ depending upon age, sophistication, and experience. The illustrations, ranging from full-page spreads to small vignettes, are startlingly and powerfully conceived, the fanciful cloud-shapes both funny and elegant. Reminiscent of both William Pene du Bois's Lion and Pat Cummings's C.L.O.U.D.S., the book nevertheless ascends to new heights. In fact, it definitely inspires a bit of sky-watching." Horn Book

"From levitating frogs to giant vegetables that take wing, Wiesner resuscitates his fondness for flying in another stretch of his imagination. In a wordless story told through picture panels and murals, a young boy is overtaken by fog on a class field trip to the top of the Empire State Building. He befriends a snowmanlike cloud who dons the boy's red cap and scarf and wings him to an ominous factory in the sky. Dubbed Sector 7, this imposing, industrial hunk of machinery is a Grand Central Station for clouds, from which they're all dispatched. The boy learns that clouds can freely take on various shapes, and soon has them twisting and stretching themselves into fish, to the dismay of the grim, uniformed workers. In a showy display, the clouds invade Manhattan, surprising cats at windows and children below. Wiesner's fans will rediscover all his favorite motifsdreams overlapping reality, metamorphosing creatures, and morerendered in precise watercolors with tilted perspectives." Kirkus Reviews

"Finding shapes in the clouds is a grand pastime on a lazy day. But what makes those shapes anyway? and what if you had the power to alter them, to create new forms and details when amorphous arrangements are the norm? In a fittingly wordless book, this is exactly what happens to one young boy on a field trip to the top of the Empire State Building-where anything can happen, if movies are to be believed. This time, as the building is veiled in mist, a friendly cloud appears to the boy and after a few playful moments takes him on a tour of Sector 7, a factory-like satellite where clouds are shaped, classified, and distributed. The structure is like a Victorian railroad station with signs noting arrival and departure times, but tubes shaped like large funnels, not tracks, disperse the clouds to their assigned locattions. The organization is hhhhhhierarchical, regimented, and traditional. Perhaps that is why the playful cloud interjects a new element-a boy with imagination who can draw. And draw he does, fantastic shapes of sea life that confound the regular staff members who do not appreciate his artistry. Expelled for insubordination, he is sent via cloud-carrier back to the Empire State Building just in time to rejoin his schoolmates for the return trip. But there is a different aura about him, and the clouds he inspired are amazing onlookers-much to the consternation of Sector 7! As with all wordless books, individual readers will supply the "text"; consequently, interpretations of exactly what's going on may differ depending upon age, sophistication, and experience. The illustrations, ranging from full-page spreads to small vignettes, are startlingly and powerfully conceived, the fanciful cloud-shapes both funny and elegant. Reminiscent of both William Pene du Bois's Lion and Pat Cummings's C.L.O.U.D.S., the book nevertheless ascends to new heights. In fact, it definitely inspires a bit of sky-watching." Horn Book, Starred

"Wiesner's fans will be on Cloud 9 with this wordless scenario of a class trip to the Empire State Building. . . . The framed panels have a cinematic quality that sweeps readers off into the clouds along with the boy. This wittily depicted stretch of the imagination displays Wiesner's talent in top form." School Library Journal, Starred

"Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (TUESDAY) again takes to the air, with watercolors that render words superfluous." Publishers Weekly, Starred

Horn Book
Primary
Finding shapes in the clouds is a grand pastime on a lazy day. But what makes those shapes anyway? and what if you had the power to alter them, to create new forms and details when amorphous arrangements are the norm? In a fittingly wordless book, this is exactly what happens to one young boy on a field trip to the top of the Empire State Building-where anything can happen, if movies are to be believed. This time, as the building is veiled in mist, a friendly cloud appears to the boy and after a few playful moments takes him on a tour of Sector 7, a factory-like satellite where clouds are shaped, classified, and distributed. The structure is like a Victorian railroad station with signs noting arrival and departure times, but tubes shaped like large funnels, not tracks, disperse the clouds to their assigned locations. The organization is hierarchical, regimented, and traditional. Perhaps that is why the playful cloud interjects a new element-a boy with imagination who can draw. And draw he does, fantastic shapes of sea life that confound the regular staff members who do not appreciate his artistry. Expelled for insubordina-tion, he is sent via cloud-carrier back to the Empire State Building just in time to rejoin his schoolmates for the return trip. But there is a different aura about him, and the clouds he inspired are amazing onlookers-much to the consternation of Sector 7! As with all wordless books, individual readers will supply the "text"; consequently, interpre-tations of exactly what's going on may differ depending upon age, sophistication, and experience. The illustrations, ranging from full-page spreads to small vignettes, are startlingly and powerfully conceived, the fanciful cloud-shapes both funny and elegant. Reminiscent of both William Pïne du Bois's Lion and Pat Cummings's C.L.O.U.D.S., the book nevertheless ascends to new heights. In fact, it definitely inspires a bit of sky-watching. m.m.b.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (Tuesday) again takes to the air, with watercolors that render words superfluous. Here, a boy on a class trip to the Empire State Building discovers that the landmark, enveloped by fog, is nonetheless a gateway to incredible vistas indeed. The boy is soon befriended by a jolly cloud that whisks him off to a sort of Grand Central in the sky, which functions as headquarters for clouds in the metro area--Sector 7. Giant tubes funnel the clouds in and out of a designated waiting area; boards overhead track arrivals and departures (e.g., "Altocumulus" Dep. 1:03, Tube 21W). Uniformed bureaucrats keep their eyes on the skies in various locations (Hoboken, Brooklyn, Manhattan, etc.) by means of TV-type monitors, and issue each departing cloud an architectural-type drawing with precisely delineated shapes and measurements to which it must conform. The complex is rendered with the hard edges and clear definition of ultra-realism, a style that serves as an effective foil for both the wispy clouds and the story's fantastical premise. Magnificent as the "Cloud Dispatch Center" is, it is only the beginning. For the boy, having discerned the clouds' dissatisfaction with their pedestrian assignments, alters the drawings and specs so that the clouds begin to transform into blowfish, angel fish and octopus shapes. Even after the unamused bureaucrats discover his creations and summarily return him by cloud taxi to his classmates, the boy's influence persists: an elaborate tropical-sea-in-the-sky astonishes his friends (and strangers on the street), draws fish to the surface of the river, and has the city's indoors cats pawing at their windowpanes in excitement. Starting from a simple, almost obvious idea--once one has thought of it--Wiesner offers up an ingenious world of nearly unlimited possibilities. His paintings, at once highly playful and purely pristine, contain such a wealth of details that they reveal new discoveries even after repeated examinations. The frame-within-a-frame that depicts the boy's first glimpse of the Sector 7 complex, for instance, is a mesmerizing study of the variegated colors and textures of clouds. The work as a whole is an inspired embodiment of what seems to be this artist's approach to story and vision: the more you look, the more there is to see. Ages 5-up. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Susan Hepler
On a school field trip to the Empire State Building, a boy escapes on a friendly little cloud to visit Sector 7, where clouds are formed and dispersed. In totally wordless format, a genre for which it is increasingly hard to find examples, Wiesner reveals how the boy is delighted with his new friend and astounded with the train-station-like assignment room, where clouds are given the blueprints for their next shapes. Bored with the usual puffy dimensions, the clouds ask the boy to design new shapes, and soon fish and creatures of the deep are floating inside the station. Discovered by the humans who run Sector 7, the boy is escorted by a cloud and his parents back to New York where he rejoins his class. Later, the evening sky is covered with fish-clouds. Wiesner divides pages into narrative spaces, framed and unframed, which will have children looking closely and again at the details of the narrative. He evokes smiles by including small touches such as the clouds taking numbers to get a new blueprint from the boy, and the red-hatted little cloud puffing importantly before his jut-jawed cloud dad and fish and flying things appearing in various scenes. A fine addition to Wiesner's wordless and near wordless oeuvre, this one is sure to circulate in libraries and will be a favorite "talk aloud" book with groups of children.
Library Journal
K-Gr 4-A playful mist transports a schoolboy from the observation deck of the Empire State Building to a colossal cloud factory. Intricate watercolors convey the wonder and whimsy of this magical adventure. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 1-4-Wiesner's fans will be on Cloud 9 with this wordless scenario of a class trip to the Empire State Building. An initial visual clue of the drama is a fullpage illustration before the title page of a boy drawing sea creatures on the frosted windowpane of a school bus. On the top observation deck amid hovering clouds, the boy's red scarf and hat are spirited off and onto a white, puffy cloud figure (whose face is a cross between Little Toot and Casper the Ghost). The boy's new cloud pal transports him to Sector 7 and the Cloud Dispatch Center, where, akin to a train station, arrivals and departures are scheduled. The boy is introduced to other cloud forms and learns how they are shaped and channeled across the country as designated by individual blueprints. When the artistic youngster draws fanciful fish and the clouds assume their shapes, the dispatchers are shocked and ban the boy from the sector. His cloud pal returns him to the class outing, where he floats off the elevator onto the school bus. The climatic finish amuses and puzzles everyone in the story and will delight readers. The artist's fascination with floating and flying escapades is as free spirited and frolicsome as in his Tuesday (Clarion, 1991), Free Fall (Lothrop, 1988), and June 29, 1999 (Clarion, 1992). The framed panels have a cinematic quality that sweeps readers off into the clouds along with the boy. This wittily depicted stretch of the imagination displays Wiesner's talent in top form.-Julie Cummins, New York Public Library Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
New York Times Book Review
A magical mixture of science and fantasy, Sector 7 is a festival for all ages— instantly accessible to any small child and yet so irresistibly attractive to the adult eye. It's a book that invites lingering appraisal, that rewards contemplation with an invitation to imagination.
—Andrew Leonard
Midwest Book Review
This wordless picture book revolves around a boy's unusual school trip and his drawing record of his experiences. As in Wiesner's other stories, fantasy carries the day to extraordinary heights as the boy has some unusual inner city experiences.
Kirkus Reviews
From levitating frogs to giant vegetables that take wing, Wiesner resuscitates his fondness for flying in another stretch of his imagination. In a wordless story told through picture panels and murals, a young boy is overtaken by fog on a class field trip to the top of the Empire State Building. He befriends a snowmanlike cloud who dons the boy's red cap and scarf and wings him to an ominous factory in the sky. Dubbed Sector 7, this imposing, industrial hunk of machinery is a Grand Central Station for clouds, from which they're all dispatched. The boy learns that clouds can freely take on various shapes, and soon has them twisting and stretching themselves into fish, to the dismay of the grim, uniformed workers. In a showy display, the clouds invade Manhattan, surprising cats at windows and children below. Wiesner's fans will rediscover all his favorite motifs—dreams overlapping reality, metamorphosing creatures, and more—rendered in precise watercolors with tilted perspectives. Others will find themselves scratching their heads as to his purpose, other than indulging in elliptical displays and in pointlessly defying convention. (Picture book. 5-7)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780395746561
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 9/28/1999
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 278,498
  • Age range: 5 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 10.75 (h) x 0.13 (d)

Meet the Author

David Wiesner

David Wiesner's interest in visual storytelling dates back to high school days when he made silent movies and drew wordless comic books. Born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. While a student, he created a painting nine feet long, which he now recognizes as the genesis of Free Fall, his first book of his own authorship, for which he was awarded a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1989. David won his first Caldecott Medal in 1992 for Tuesday, and he has gone on to win twice more: in 2002 for The Three Pigs and in 2007 for Flotsam. He is only the second person in the award’s history to win the Caldecott Medal three times. David and his wife, Kim Kahng, and their two children live near Philadelphia, where he devotes full time to illustration and she pursues her career as a surgeon.

Biography

David Wiesner's interest in visual storytelling dates back to high school days when he made silent movies and drew wordless comic books. Born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey, he graduated from the Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. While a student, he created a painting nine feet long, which he now recognizes as the genesis of Free Fall, his first book of his own authorship, for which he was awarded a Caldecott Honor Medal in 1989.

David won his first Caldecott Medal in 1992 for Tuesday, and has gone on to win twice more: in 2002 for The Three Pigs and in 2007 for Flotsam. In addition writing and illustrating his own picture books, he has illustrated stories for many other children's authors.

Good To Know

  • At a young age, he created wordless comic books such as Slop the Wonder Pig and silent movies like his kung-fu vampire film The Saga of Butcula.

  • As an undergraduate at Rhode Island School of Design, he met two mentors: Tom Sgouros and David Macaulay who taught him the fundamentals of illustration and fostered his creative imagination. He dedicated Tuesday to Sgouros and The Three Pigs to Macaulay.

  • Wiesner is a three-time Caldecott winner and only the second person in the award's long history to claim that distinction.
  • Read More Show Less
      1. Hometown:
        Outside Philadelphia, P.A.
      1. Date of Birth:
        February 5, 1956
      2. Place of Birth:
        Bridgewater, NJ
      1. Education:
        Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.
      2. Website:

    Customer Reviews

    Average Rating 4
    ( 7 )
    Rating Distribution

    5 Star

    (3)

    4 Star

    (2)

    3 Star

    (2)

    2 Star

    (0)

    1 Star

    (0)

    Your Rating:

    Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

    Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

    Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

    Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

    We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

    What to exclude from your review:

    Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

    Reviews should not contain any of the following:

    • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
    • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
    • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
    • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
    • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
    • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
    • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

    Reminder:

    • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
    • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
    • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
    Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

    Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

    Create a Pen Name

    Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

     
    Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

    Continue Anonymously
    Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
    • Anonymous

      Posted February 4, 2010

      Let Your Imagination Fly

      This book is wonderful for cultivating a child's imagination. Interesting illustrations. A great way to open up dialogue between parent and child.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted November 22, 2000

      Whimsical

      Weisner is always imaginative and almost surreal. He takes us to places we've only been as children and in Sector 7 he stays true to this creed. As picture book collector, this is a great addition, and all the kids I show it to love it.

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted May 8, 2000

      A book for all ages

      This is supposed to be a book for older kids, but my 18-month-old loves it! Because it doesn't have words, the reader can make up his own 'story' to go with the beautiful pictures. A great book!

      Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
    • Anonymous

      Posted December 16, 2010

      No text was provided for this review.

    • Anonymous

      Posted December 16, 2010

      No text was provided for this review.

    • Anonymous

      Posted July 6, 2010

      No text was provided for this review.

    • Anonymous

      Posted June 18, 2009

      No text was provided for this review.

    Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)