Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems / Edition 1
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Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems / Edition 1

5.0 2
by Ross J. Anderson
     
 

ISBN-10: 0471389226

ISBN-13: 9780471389224

Pub. Date: 03/28/2001

Publisher: Wiley

The first quick reference guide to the do's and don'ts of creating high quality security systems.
Ross Anderson, widely recognized as one of the world's foremost authorities on security engineering, presents a comprehensive design tutorial that covers a wide range of applications. Designed for today's programmers who need to build systems that withstand malice as

Overview

The first quick reference guide to the do's and don'ts of creating high quality security systems.
Ross Anderson, widely recognized as one of the world's foremost authorities on security engineering, presents a comprehensive design tutorial that covers a wide range of applications. Designed for today's programmers who need to build systems that withstand malice as well as error (but have no time to go do a PhD in security), this book illustrates basic concepts through many real-world system design successes and failures. Topics range from firewalls, through phone phreaking and copyright protection, to frauds against e-businesses. Anderson's book shows how to use a wide range of tools, from cryptology through smartcards to applied psychology. As everything from burglar alarms through heart monitors to bus ticket dispensers starts talking IP, the techniques taught in this book will become vital to everyone who wants to build systems that are secure, dependable and manageable.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471389224
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
03/28/2001
Pages:
640
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 9.34(h) x 1.38(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

About the Author.

Foreword.

Acknowledgments.

Legal Notice.

PART ONE.

What Is Security Engineering?

Protocols.

Passwords.

Access Control.

Cryptography.

Distributed Systems.

PART TWO.

Multilevel Security.

Multilateral Security.

Banking and Bookkeeping.

Monitoring Systems.

Nuclear Command and Control.

Security Printing and Seals.

Biometrics.

Physical Tamper Resistance.

Emission Security.

Electronic and Information Warfare.

Telecom System Security.

Network Attack and Defense.

Protecting E-Commerce Systems.

Copyright and Privacy Protection.

PART THREE.

E-Policy.

Management Issues.

System Evaluation and Assurance.

Conclusions.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Security Engineering: A Guide to Building Dependable Distributed Systems 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago

This book does so much more than guiding the reader through the design of distributed systems. It is the most comprehensive and general definition and illustration of information security that I have ever seen in one place. This is a book that can teach you to look at the world through security glasses so to speak and that of course is a prerequisite for security engineering. It is also a good thing to be able to do if you need to evaluate security measures for quality and appropriateness.

The way Ross Anderson goes about this task is systematic and pedagogical. He has obviously been lecturing for many years and is both an excellent presenter and a person demonstrating a good understanding of learning curves. Both the book as a whole and the individual chapters have been constructed in such a way that the reader can give up at various points of complexity without losing the plot altogether and simply start at the beginning of the following chapter for a less deep education than if he read and understood everything but nevertheless gaining a comprehensive feel for the nature of security and how to tackle its implementation. This design also enables the book to be used either as a textbook or as a reference work. Very smart - many technical authors could learn something from observing how Ross goes about it.

I also like that each chapter ends with a discussion of possible research projects, literature recommendations and of course a summary. The only irritating thing is that there are too many stupid typos such as missing words, things which another read-through by the editor should have caught. An example: `...using the key in Figure 5.7, it enciphers to TB while rf enciphers to OB...' should be `...using the key in Figure 5.7, rd enciphers to TB while rf enciphers to OB...' It is fine to use typographic tricks for illustrative purposes but you must make sure they make it into print if you do. I'm certain many readers will find the chapter on cryptography difficult enough without errors. Well, next edition...

The book consists of three parts. The first is a quite basic intro to security concepts, protocols, human-to-computer interfaces, access control, cryptography and distributed systems. I think that perhaps Ross gets a little bit carried away in Chapter 5 on crypt - I mean, why is a proof for Fermat's little theorem included? There are no other mathematical proofs anywhere. I also think that parts of this chapter could benefit from added verbosity or perhaps a few more illustrations. Whereas in this context it is not so important how crypt primitives function internally it is of course very important how they behave as system components. Just a suggestion - no real criticism.

In the second part of the book the author ingeniously uses a whole range of well-known systems incorporating security to illustrate both analytical methods and security engineering fundamentals. Using this pedagogical method, moving from the concrete and well-known to the abstract and general is good engineering practice. Almost every main section contains a subsection called What Goes Wrong in which the author analyses and presents architectural and design weaknesses in everything from ATMs to nuclear systems. I find this approach incredibly valuable, not only because it teaches good engineering methodology but also because it gives the author an opportunity to present a huge number of security problems at the implementation level in a context, from which they can be lifted, cross-referenced and placed in different contexts. This method, combined with the informed and intelligent analysis is what makes this book such a brilliant generator of understanding of security, the broad and full concept.

Also in this part of the book there is a clear line which is not only technological but which serves to place security concepts in organisational frameworks, another very strong point in favour of this work. This leads to t

Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the book I wish had been around in the early 1980s when I started earning my living doing security engineering. Then, there were plenty books and research papers on theory, but little on the actual practice. Nowadays, the situation is still much the same. And just as bridge builders learn more from the one bridge that falls down than from the hundreds that don't, so security engineers can learn much more from studying how real systems have been built - and, especially, how they have failed. The real problems have to do with system-level concepts; they lie in understanding what your application's protection requirements really are, and how you can combine the available mechanisms intelligently to meet them. This book distills the system know-how I've learnt in years as a banker, in more years as a security consultant, and in still more years as an academic. Putting it together has been fun. It's also been a valuable research exercise: there's no better way of finding out what you don't know than trying to write down what you do. With luck, this book will serve as a snapshot of what we know - and of what we don't - at the beginning of the twenty-first century. I hope you have as much fun reading it as I had writing it!