Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists, 1958-1968

Overview


Pop Art was one of the most important artistic movements of the late twentieth century. Its adaptation of mediated, popular-culture imagery continues to influence artists, but until now, little attention has been paid to the important contributions that women made to the movement. Pop Art by women dealt less with direct consumerist critiques, instead subversively combating the stereotypical perceptions of women via advertising and film clichés. Work by women Pop artists ranges from Rosalyn Drexler’s surreal ...
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Overview


Pop Art was one of the most important artistic movements of the late twentieth century. Its adaptation of mediated, popular-culture imagery continues to influence artists, but until now, little attention has been paid to the important contributions that women made to the movement. Pop Art by women dealt less with direct consumerist critiques, instead subversively combating the stereotypical perceptions of women via advertising and film clichés. Work by women Pop artists ranges from Rosalyn Drexler’s surreal film-noir riffs, Idelle Weber’s New Realism office workers, and Niki de Saint Phalle’s exuberant Nanas to the more controversial and blatantly political statements of Faith Ringgold and Martha Rosler. Pauline Boty and Axell explored female desire, while the innovative soft structures stitched by Yayoi Kusama, Jann Haworth, Patty Mucha, and others form an important contribution to the history of sculpture.

Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists 1958–1968 is the catalogue of the first exhibition to expand Pop Art’s narrow critical definition to reflect the significant role of these women artists. The culmination of six years of research by Sid Sachs, this exhibition, organized by the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery of the University of the Arts, Philadelphia, is touring nationally. The essays in this catalogue span from London’s Independent Group in the early 1950s to the end of classic Pop in 1968. Written by the art historians Linda Nochlin, Sid Sachs, Kalliopi Minioudaki, Bradford R. Collins, Annika Öhrner, and Sue Tate and the artists Martha Rosler and Patty Mucha, these texts will be revelations and will remain a vital reference for artists, art and cultural historians, and feminists alike. Artworks by more than twenty artists are reproduced, including Pauline Boty, Chryssa, Rosalyn Drexler, Jann Haworth, Yayoi Kusama, and Marisol, as well as now lesser-known figures such as Barbro Östlihn and Dorothy Grebenak. Numerous works are discussed in depth from a number of vantage points.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Helpfully... the catalog is less a document of the exhibition than a stand-alone book. It provides information on the lives and careers of women artists identified with Pop and furnishes a context for both the period and the show." —Art in America

"Excellent exhibition catalog." —Artforum

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780789210654
  • Publisher: Abbeville Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/21/2010
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 12.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Sid Sachs, curator of Seductive Subversion , is Director of Exhibitions, Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, University of the Arts, Philadelphia. Previous exhibitions include Pop Abstraction , Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art (1998); Yvonne Rainer: Radical Juxtapositions 1961-2002 , UArts (2002); and To Smithereens: Paintings by Rosalyn Drexler 1961-2003 , UArts (2004).

Kalliopi Minoudaki is a feminist historian of modern and contemporary art who lives and works in New York and Athens. She has published on Axell, Pauline Boty, Rosalyn Drexler, and Niki de Saint Phalle, and her dissertation was on women Pop artists, difference, and marginality.

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Table of Contents


Foreword
Running on Empty: Women, Pop and the Society of Consumption
Beyond the Surface: Women and Pop Art 1958–1968
Pop Proto-Feminisms: Beyond the Paradox of the Woman Pop Artist
Soft Sculpture Sunshine
Reclamations: Rosalyn Drexler's Early Pop Paintings, 1961-67
The Figure of the Artist, The Figure of the Woman
Painting Manhattan in the Era of Pop—Barbro Östlihn
A Transgression Too Far: Women Artists and the British Pop Art Movement
Notes
Acknowledgments
Index of Artworks Illustrated
Image Credits
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