See Dad Cook: The Only Book a Guy Needs to Feed Family and Friends (and Himself)

See Dad Cook: The Only Book a Guy Needs to Feed Family and Friends (and Himself)

by Wayne Brachman
     
 

Sorry, fellas, June Cleaver doesn’t live here anymore, and the days when a dad could claim to be clueless in the kitchen and get away with it are gone forever. Today, Dad is expected to be right there in the thick of it—preparing dinner, whipping up lunches, and making sure the family starts off the day with a healthy breakfast. But what’s a guy to… See more details below

Overview

Sorry, fellas, June Cleaver doesn’t live here anymore, and the days when a dad could claim to be clueless in the kitchen and get away with it are gone forever. Today, Dad is expected to be right there in the thick of it—preparing dinner, whipping up lunches, and making sure the family starts off the day with a healthy breakfast. But what’s a guy to do if he’s never filled a pot with water, let alone boiled any?

Wayne Harley Brachman, professional chef and father of two, knows from personal experience what you’re up against in the kitchen: limited time, limited knowledge, and a family of finicky eaters. In See Dad Cook, you’ll learn the ins and outs of real-world cooking, including recipes for easy, battlefield-tested family favorites like:

Breakfast Burritos, Blueberry Pancakes, Philly Cheese Steaks, Pizza Noodles, Shrimp on the Barbie, Pot Roast with Pan Gravy, Dad’s Kitchen Sink Sundae

See Dad Cook is your kitchen survival guide, full of foods your family actually wants to eat—including recipes for real kitchen basics like Tuna Salad and Meat Loaf. Brachman also offers advice on cooking with your kids, getting them to eat well, stocking a pantry, and the very few tools you’ll need to pull it off without a hitch.

Once you get started, you’ll find that cooking is easier and a lot more fun than you thought. Best of all, it gives you a chance to bring something you’re really proud of to the table—your family!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Brachman (Cakes and Cowpokes) aims this collection of 125 shortcut-filled recipes at harried Harrys who've never thought to read the back of a spaghetti box nor imagined melting cheese over nacho chips in the microwave. Ultra-simple preparation is at the heart of his effort. Most concoctions require about five basic ingredients (e.g., bouillon cubes serve as the dynamo in a chicken salad that otherwise blends the bird with ho-hum mayo, celery, salt and pepper). Occasional entrees of interest do appear, such as Shrimp Oreganata, which calls for oregano leaves and lemon and lime juice to offset the familiar chicken broth and garlic. Creamy Macaroni and Cheese uses pecorino and cheddar, as well as American. But often as not, Brachman goes lowbrow. His recipe for sauerkraut calls for a dash of oil, an onion and a pound of sauerkraut. Brachman livens up the fairly short dessert chapter with several baked challenges such as Multi-Grain Apple Muffins and Butterscotch Chippers. They are warm and challenging alternatives to Dad's Kitchen-Sink Sundae, for which no self-respecting father should ever need a printed recipe. 40 line drawings. (May) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Brachman was pastry chef for Bobby Flay's Mesa Grill and Bolo in New York City, and his two previous books were all about desserts. Now he's cooking meals for his young kids and planning to open a "family-friendly" bakery/cafe in Greenwich Village-and his new book includes 125 recipes for all courses of a meal, mostly in the comfort-food zone: Macaroni Salad, Pot Roast with Pan Gravy, Chicken Parmigiana. Sidebars include easy shortcuts, tips ("Do It Like the Pros"), and suggestions for varying the recipe when it's "Adults Only." Although the recipes are uncomplicated, some of them don't seem particularly geared to kids (garlic appears in a surprising number of dishes, including Garlicky Broccoli). Debra Ponzek's recent Family Kitchen offers ways to involve kids in cooking along with its recipes, and Ann Hodgman's hilarious One Bite Won't Kill You includes recipes for even the pickiest of eaters. But dads who would like to cook more for their kids should find Brachman's book an unintimidating way to start. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400081875
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/02/2006
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
7.34(w) x 9.07(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt

See Dad Cook


By Wayne Brachman

Clarkson Potter

Copyright © 2006 Wayne Harley Brachman
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1-4000-8187-4


Chapter One

Ingredients

1 and one-half (1.5) pounds skinless, boneless chicken breast halves

Three-quarters (.75) of a cup all-purpose flour

1 large egg

Three-quarters (.75) of a cup of milk

2 cups plain dry bread crumbs, preferably Japanese panko (see Do It Like the Pros, below)

Vegetable oil (preferably canola), for frying (about 2 and one-half (2.5) cups)

To Prepare

1. Horizontally slice the breasts in half so they are about a half-inch (.5) inch thick. (If you want genuine, super-thin schnitzel, put the breasts between two sheets of wax paper or plastic wrap and gently hammer them out until they are one-third of an inch thick. You can use a meat mallet, an empty beer bottle, or a plain old hammer.)

2. Put the flour in a medium bowl. In a second medium (or larger) bowl, mix together the egg and milk. Put the bread crumbs in a large bowl. (If you don't have enough large bowls, put your crumbs in a baking pan or any other large vessel.)

3. One by one, dip the chicken in the flour to coat, shaking off the excess. Dip each piece into the egg mixture to coat, and then thoroughly coat with bread crumbs. Place on a large plate.

4. In a large skillet, heat three-quarters (.75) of an inch of oil over high heat until it starts to shimmer, about 6minutes. (You may also use a deep fryer or candy thermometer to gauge the temperature: 365°F is perfect.) Turn the heat down to medium-high.

5. Working in small batches, fry the schnitzels for 4 minutes on each side, or until golden brown and cooked through. Remove from the oil with tongs and drain well on paper towels.

Do It Like the Pros

The best bread crumbs are panko from Japan. Go figure. Panko fry up super-crunchy and seem to absorb less oil. It's worth hunting them down at an Asian market, but your schnitzels will still be majorleaguers if you make them with plain old bread crumbs from the supermarket.

Shortcut Club

You'll pay a little more, but if you buy thin-cut chicken breast or chicken tenders, you will be able to skip slicing the chicken yourself.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from See Dad Cook by Wayne Brachman Copyright © 2006 by Wayne Harley Brachman. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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