See How They Run (Revised Reissue): Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House by Susan E. Goodman, Elwood Smith |, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
See How They Run: Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House

See How They Run: Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House

by Susan E. Goodman, Elwood Smith
     
 

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Using witty anecdotes and clear explanations, acclaimed writer Susan E. Goodman takes readers from the birth of democracy to the Electoral College; from front porch campaigning to hanging chads. It's all here, spiced up with Elwood Smith's witty illustrations, hilarious sidebars, photographs, and solid back matter. It's a landslide victory: See How They Run

Overview

Using witty anecdotes and clear explanations, acclaimed writer Susan E. Goodman takes readers from the birth of democracy to the Electoral College; from front porch campaigning to hanging chads. It's all here, spiced up with Elwood Smith's witty illustrations, hilarious sidebars, photographs, and solid back matter. It's a landslide victory: See How They Run stands above the rest as the most accessible, informative, and enjoyable election book on the market.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Anyone who needs a clear explanation of how a candidate can get the most popular votes and still lose the election should read See How They Run. (Did you know that Thomas Jefferson thought that the electoral college was "the most dangerous blot on our Constitution"?) Susan Goodman examines American democracy and political campaigns from 1789 to the groundbreaking Democratic primaries between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama. Goodman includes the formation of political parties and contemporary voting issues, touching on difficult subjects such as election shenanigans, negative campaigning and voter fraud. The book's archival photos from the Library of Congress, humorous cartoons and informative sidebars hold the reader's attention. In one sidebar called "Getting Better All the Time," the author observes that our democracy isn't perfect, but progressive: "Good News: The United States was the first modern democracy with an elected government protecting the freedom and rights of its citizens. The Bad News: In the beginning, only white men who owned land could vote.” —Washington Post

“This witty "Schoolhouse Rock"-style book uses easy-to-understand examples to explain nearly every aspect of the voting process. Starting with a "short history of democracy," as the ancient Greeks saw it back in 510 BC, it features a wealth of trivia to intrigue kids and adults alike. Did you know you could be president after winning only 11 states (the most populated ones, natch) or that outgoing prez John Quincy Adams (No. 6), was so angry about losing to Andrew Jackson that he boycotted his inauguration? Thought so.” —New York Post

“Clearly written in terms that students will identify with, See How They Run makes it clear how important civic engagement is to the future of our nation.” —Meg Heubeck, Director of Instruction, University of Virginia Center for Politics

“Makes learning about elections enlightening, enriching and never boring! A charming and funny book for every future voter.” —nonprofitvotes.org

“A lighthearted, fact-filled look at elections in the United States. The engaging conversational narrative and funny cartoons lend appealing irreverence to a topic that can sometimes seem too dry and serious. At the same time, the book covers a lot of ground and introduces concepts and personalities in ways that readers will understand and remember. Coverage includes the electoral college, campaigning, and many other aspects of elections, noting the flaws and absurdities in our system along with the many positive aspects. The text moves deftly back and forth through time within each subject, offering useful and varied historical examples. A section on inaugurations, for example, makes reference to William Henry Harrison's two-hour speech, Bill Clinton's night of dancing, and Andrew Jackson's rowdy White House party. "The Campaign Road" features several amusing instances of varied practices while also providing a cohesive summary of the topic's relevance. Plentiful illustrations utilize humor to demonstrate content, as in the depiction of a man with elongated arms straddling a state line and voting in two states at once. Even the photographs of presidents feature an amusing caption or word balloon. The final chapter addresses the role of kids, offering suggestions for involvement that range from writing letters to "bugging your parents." Informative, entertaining, and timely, this is a fine example of how well-conceived humor can make a potentially complicated topic not only more appealing, but also more comprehensible and even inspiring.” —School Library Journal

Lisa Von Drasek
Anyone who needs a clear explanation of how a candidate can get the most popular votes and still lose the election should read …The book's archival photos from the Library of Congress, humorous cartoons and informative sidebars hold the reader's attention.
—The Washington Post
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
See How They Run brings playfulness to the political scene with its lively text by Susan Goodman and visually appealing sidebars, presidential portraits and cartoons by Elwood Smith. Short chapters with pithy titles such as "Party Animals" and "Who's Paying the Bills?" catch the attention of young readers and then deliver substantive material on the origin of party mascots and campaign financing, respectively. Did you know that when the opposing party labeled Democrat Andrew Jackson a "jackass," Jackson reacted by putting "a picture of this strong-minded animal on his campaign posters"? What a way to turn derogations to one's advantage! Informative and entertaining, this book more than delivers on the promise of its subtitle "Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House." Reviewer: Mary Quattlebaum
School Library Journal

Gr 4-7- A lighthearted, fact-filled look at elections in the United States. The engaging conversational narrative and funny cartoons lend appealing irreverence to a topic that can sometimes seem too dry and serious. At the same time, the book covers a lot of ground and introduces concepts and personalities in ways that readers will understand and remember. Coverage includes the electoral college, campaigning, and many other aspects of elections, noting the flaws and absurdities in our system along with the many positive aspects. The text moves deftly back and forth through time within each subject, offering useful and varied historical examples. A section on inaugurations, for example, makes reference to William Henry Harrison's two-hour speech, Bill Clinton's night of dancing, and Andrew Jackson's rowdy White House party. "The Campaign Road" features several amusing instances of varied practices while also providing a cohesive summary of the topic's relevance. Plentiful illustrations utilize humor to demonstrate content, as in the depiction of a man with elongated arms straddling a state line and voting in two states at once. Even the photographs of presidents feature an amusing caption or word balloon. The final chapter addresses the role of kids, offering suggestions for involvement that range from writing letters to "bugging your parents." Informative, entertaining, and timely, this is a fine example of how well-conceived humor can make a potentially complicated topic not only more appealing, but also more comprehensible and even inspiring.-Steven Engelfried, Multnomah County Library, OR

Kirkus Reviews
Stating that "democracy is a messy business and it's our job to sort it out," Goodman takes a simplified route through the electoral process in this country, with special reference to presidential elections. Her anecdotal history starts with ancient Athens, closes with ways that readers too young to vote (in national elections, at least) can become politically involved and in between covers styles of campaigning, vice presidents, assassinations, dirty tricks, the Electoral College, hanging chads and related topics. Smith's cartoon illustrations crank up the presentation's light tone with comical views of candidates and voters, along with free-association riffs on donkeys vs. elephants, Congress, campaign financing and more. All in all, the team that produced The Truth About Poop (2007) and Gee Whiz! All About Pee (2006) treat their timely and (more or less) new topic with the same engaging informality. Readers will come away a little more informed about how elections work, and perhaps motivated to make their own voices heard. (resource list, index) (Nonfiction. 9-11)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781599902852
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
05/27/2008
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.80(d)
Lexile:
870L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

SUSAN E. GOODMAN is the author of more than thirty nonfiction books for children, including How Do You Burp in Space?; See How They Run: Campaign Dreams, Election Schemes, and the Race to the White House;All in Just One Cookie, an ALA Notable Book; and On This Spot, a Washington Post Top Picture Book of the Year. She lives in Boston, Massachusetts.
www.susangoodmanbooks.com

ELWOOD H. SMITH is an illustrator and animator whose books include The Truth About Poop, GeeWhiz, Raise the Roof, and others. His work can be seen inside the Eco-bathroom at the Bronx Zoo, as well as in packages of shrinky dinks. This is his third book with Susan Goodman. He lives in upstate New York.www.elwoodsmith.com

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