Seeds of Turmoil: The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East

Overview

A clear, in-depth biblical explanation of the origin, history, and significance of the Middle East conflict.

The current conflict in the Middle East began long before the creation of the state of Israel in 1948. It originated when Abraham sinned, distorting God's promise that he and his heirs would make a great nation and inherit the land now called The Holy Land.

A historical and political account, Seeds of Turmoil clearly explains the ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$18.04
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$19.99 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (47) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $1.99   
  • Used (36) from $1.99   
Seeds of Turmoil: The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

A clear, in-depth biblical explanation of the origin, history, and significance of the Middle East conflict.

The current conflict in the Middle East began long before the creation of the state of Israel in 1948. It originated when Abraham sinned, distorting God's promise that he and his heirs would make a great nation and inherit the land now called The Holy Land.

A historical and political account, Seeds of Turmoil clearly explains the biblical story of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar and the ensuing sibling rivalry between Jacob and Esau, whose choices formed the world's three most influential religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

This fascinating insight into the beginnings of the conflict also explains what about the land is so important today. In addition, Wright sheds light on the conflicting Jewish, Christian, and Islamic perspectives and answers the question, Does God play favorites?

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780849948152
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/31/2010
  • Pages: 223
  • Sales rank: 944,784
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 11.30 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledments xiii

The Biblical Roots of the Middle East Conflict xv

Part 1 The Founders of the Conflict

1 One Man's Decision: Abraham 3

2 An Everlasting Possession: The Holy Land 15

3 Two Women Who Shaped History: Sarah and Hagar 35

4 Sibling Rivalry: Isaac and Ishmael 53

5 Playing Favorites: Isaac and Rebekah, sau and Jacob 65

6 Reaping What you Sow: Jacob and the Birth of Isreal 77

7 A Miraculous Restoration: The State of Israel and Neighboring Arab Nations 93

8 Israel's Greatest Threat Today: Iran 107

Part 2 Conflicting Perspectives

9 The Jewish Perspective 119

10 The Islamic Perspective 137

11 The Christian Perspective 153

Some Final Thoughts: Three Burning Questions 169

Timeline 174

Glossary 177

Study and Discussion Guide 189

Notes 215

About the Author 223

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 20, 2012

    Understanding the Middle East

    f you have ever struggled to understand what is going on in Israel and the many conflicts in the Middle East, then Seeds of Turmoil by Bryant Wright is the book you need to read. This book is written in an easy-to-read format. It comes from a biblical standpoint to explain the troubles and how they originate from what we read in the Old Testament. This book ties the bible directly to the current conflicts.

    I am a terrible non-fiction reader. But I did find this book easy to read as I began it. Since I am such a terrible non-fiction reader, completing the book was a total challenge. But, if you are interested in the current political scene and conflicts surrounding Israel, this is a great primer. This is not for you if you have already studied the conflicts and happenings in the Middle East. It is the basics and originations of these conflicts.

    I received my copy of Seeds of Turmoil from the book Sneeze review program in order to complete my review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 16, 2011

    Confusing but informative

    A good book packed full of information, but confusing in areas. The connection between the Bible and current day has always been interesting and this book helps connect readers to what happened back then and how it is effecting us today in the Middle East. Along with what happened in between that had also contributed to the current day conditions. Loved reading the history of Israel and how it had swapped hands. This book answered some questions that I didn't even know that I had. Although a hard read at times I jumping from history that I enjoyed to life lessons had gotten me confused and overwhelmed. A must read for anyone that doesn't know what happened. Maybe the second time around I will be able to get a better picture in some of the harder to understand parts of the book. Got lost several times and put the book down to take a break. However when I picked it back up I was able to get more into it. I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 8, 2011

    This book was not for me, But it may be for you!

    So I recently read a book entitled: Seeds of Turmoil. Let me tell you it was not as good as I thought it would be. The book is supposed to talk about the biblical roots of the turmoil in the Jerusalem area. I thought it would be a lot more biblical but to me there was more about the constant wars & outbreaks in that area. I guess I didn't investigate what the book was going to be about more thoroughly before I sent for it. I really didn't like it and had a hard time reading it. I actually couldn't finish it. I was that bored.








    This book may be good for readers who enjoy those types of topics, but this book was just not for me. Don't take my opinion to heart. Go read it for yourself & make your decision.








    *I Got this book free for blogging for Booksneeze.*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 16, 2011

    Extreme Prejudice, Problematic Theology Marks this Book

    Seeds Of Turmoil, written by Bryant Wright has got to be the worst book I have ever read. Or rather, as I could not bring myself to finish the book, have begun to read. Wright's book is full of abysmal scholarship, suspect history, problematic theology, and extreme prejudice. Wright makes multiple assertions without any source citation. What citation is made is often dubious; for example, in the second chapter, he claims that former President Truman made his decision to recognize the State of Israel as sovereign in part out of his knowledge of the Scripture-a claim that cites pastor David Jeremiah. In a later chapter, Wright mentions the phrase "dark night of the soul" multiple times with no reference to St. John of the Cross. I would expect more from such a book. From outright denial of foreign help to Israel to a subtle but distinct conservative Christian bias in regard to US and British history, Wright's historical reports could use help. Wright often makes wild extrapolations with no justification. From a single passage in Genesis comes the assertion modern Israel holds the right to the land of biblical Israel; from another is the reason why there is conflict among Muslims. What I find most problematic is his belief that the modern secular state of Israel is the theocratic Israel of biblical times-this is the basis of his book, yet it's an inaccurate belief. Despite this, I might have been able to finish the book had it not been for his prejudice against Muslims. From the first chapter on, it was evident that for whatever reason, Wright feels contemptuous toward Muslims. I understand that he believes Islam is a false religion, but there is no reason to assert Muslims shouldn't exist, as Wright does in this book. As such, I do not feel comfortable with a recommendation-I would give it 0 stars were it possible. *As a BookSneeze blogger, I was given a complimentary book for review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2011

    Learn the Biblical History of the Middle East

    I've told the Bible stories of Moses, Abraham, Sarah & Hagar, Ishmael & Isaac, Jacob & Esau and the Israelites' exodus to God's promised land countless times to my children. I,too, have known and read those Bible stories since I was a child but I have not been able to connect them to what is currently happening in the Middle East. It was only after reading Seeds of Turmoil - The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East by Bryant Wright that I understood the connection.

    Part 1 traces the roots of the Middle East conflict to the one major decision that Abraham and Sarah made to try to 'help' God in giving them a child. Through Sarah's maidservant Hagar, Ishmael was born. Then after many years, God's covenant child through Sarah, Isaac, was born. Bryant Wright wrote clearly why this became the root of the conflict. The he goes on to explain how Isaac's heirs, Jacob and Esau's conflict, grew from that seed of sin that came from Abraham and Sarah. The author then clearly explains the history of the following generations connecting it to the current crisis we see in the Middle East.

    Part 2 of the book explains the Jewish, Islamic and Christian perspective. These last three chapters gives voice to each of these group's perspectives and gives reasons for why they act that way. The book ends with the author's final thoughts - three important questions that will help us more to understand God.

    MY THOUGHTS:

    Having had the opportunity in the past to do an in-depth study on the Old Testament, I was very excited to read Seeds of Turmoil - The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East by Bryant Wright. The book did not disappoint me because everything was explained so clearly. The author also provided maps to help in understanding history. Though there were a few pages when it started to become cumbersome, it also quickly picked up when I read the three different perspectives.

    I believe that this is a book that every Christian has to read so that we can see and understand how God works. Especially the last part of the book where the author answers three important questions about God. Bryant Wright did a great job in pointing out how the sin of unbelief can affect all of us in the years to come. I can't say enough good things about this book. I am highly recommending Seeds of Turmoil - The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East by Bryant Wright.



    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2011

    No new information. Just stick to the Bible!

    I was really looking forward to reading this book when I received it before Christmas. I think the historical roots of the conflict in the middle east are very important to understand what's going on today, but I don't have any great knowledge of it, or so I thought. I started reading this book, and got to thinking maybe I know more about it than I thought. I read through the first half or so of the book, waiting to learn something new. Didn't happen. Kept reading; still nothing that I hadn't already heard.
    What I did find was a lot of conjecture about how this person or that person would have been feeling or thinking, but it a sarcastic kind of way. I have to say, I did not appreciate the author's dry sense of humor. I felt that it didn't fit the story and didn't do justice to the characters that he was discussing. The book went through the biblical stories in the book of Genesis, but did not provide any depth or insight that I had not heard other places.
    Conclusion: Read this book if you really truly know nothing about the biblical history of the conflict in the middle east (i.e. the story of Ishmael and Isaac). Otherwise, don't waste your time.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2011

    Pretty good book:)

    I recently read another book from BookSneeze (as a disclaimer, according to some law thing, I'm under no obligation to give a positive review. So when I'm talking about these books, I'm talking how I legitly feel about them, okay? Okay. J) It was called "Seeds of Turmoil". Seeds of Turmoil is a book that, on paper, is a good idea. But in writing, it is very hard to get into. The feeling through the book is a very charismatic feeling, very showy and flashy. It's a good book, however, in that it delves into history and gives good discriptions. It attempts to explain the conflict in the Middle East using a Biblical perspective, which is both admirable and interesting. I honestly did enjoy the book once I got into it. But that's where the issues lie- it took me a long, long time to actually get into the book. Bryant Wright opens with, "As a pastor, I'm always asked, 'Bryant, why can't these people get along?'" I'm paraphrasing, but it was like that- and it felt kind of, I don't know. I didn't enjoy the opening and if based only on that one sentence, I wouldn't recommend it. But if you add up all the parts of the whole, it is an intriguing book and if you are someone who enjoys history and stuff like that, you will enjoy this book. I think that I will give it 4 out of 5 stars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 10, 2011

    A Great Read-Tons of Information!

    I recently finished the book "Seeds of Turmoil, The biblical roots of the inevitable crisis in the Middle East" by Bryant Wright, which I would highly recommend for reading to anyone. Wright takes you through the book of Genesis telling the stories and relating how these stories have brought about the turmoil in the Middle East. As the book continues he relates to the readers from the perspectives of Muslims, Jews and Christians alike, while acknowledging that his opinions are somewhat biased as he is a Christian.
    As a student of the Bible and having just finished a 12 week Bible study on the book of Gensis I found this book to be both enlightening and entertaining. While I am not usually one to read a book about history I found that I enjoyed and learned a lot from this book. I was pleased that Wright included somewhat of a disclaimer when he got to the end of his book and was trying to explain things from a Jewish point of view, letting the reader know that he certainly wasn't Jewish so perhaps he was a bit biased, but assured readers of his love for Jewish peoples and encouraged all Christian readers to love all peoples as well. I found that the book was a quick read, perhaps because of my recent study of this particular part of the Bible and the interest I already had, but I think most people will find that learning about why there is conflict in the Middle East is something very interesting as well as something we all should understand as the times we live in are a testiment to such drama. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who loves history and anyone who wants to understand more about what is going on over in the Middle East.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 8, 2011

    A book worth reading.

    Seeds of Turmoil surprised me from the beginning chapter. I work for an organization that reaches out and does Muslim evangelism. Over the past 3 years I have observed how the seeds of Abraham have indeed affected every aspect between Christian and Islamic relations. Wright creates a firm foundation, helping to answer through Biblical references the reasons behind the Middle East turmoil. The title is perfect for the content within, Abraham, the one who bore the seed of the future also bore with it the chaos we see today of an unobtainable peace. On a scale of one to ten, I give this book a 7.5. Well done.

    I received this book free from Thomas Nelson as part of their BookSneeze program. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Seeds of Turmoil: The Biblical Roots of the Inevitable Crisis in the Middle East

    This book presents a compelling argument that traces the the current crises in the Middle East back to Abraham of the Bible (Old Testament). From Abraham and Sarah's sin, that was meant to "help God" by allowing Sarah's servant, Hagar, to bear Abraham's first son to the fulfillment of God's promise to Abraham that Sarah will bear him a son: Ishmael and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; the "birth" of the chosen people, Israel; Israel's struggles and becoming a nation; Israel's loss of its nation (and the Jews were scattered among other nations); Israel's becoming of a nation again in 1948; Israel's wars with the Muslim nations since 1948; coupled with the explanations of the beginning and rise of Christianity and Islam.

    The author makes a very insightful and compelling biblical and historical account for the current Middle Eastern Crises. I wasn't sure if I'd like this book, as I assumed it would be based on bible prophesies that are hard to understand. This book is not about bible prophesy, though some is cited and is easily verified with the Bible. This book is fascinating. I read the book practically nonstop, it was so hard to put down. Everything, including Islam, can be traced back to Abraham.

    I highly recommend this book. It well thought, thorough and includes a time line of events. It may seem far fetched, but the author describes a biblical, historical and chronological account of events that makes it hard to deny a strong correlation with the present Middle East.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2011

    interesting read

    Author Bryant Wright describes the roots of the conflict in the Middle East. He goes back to the Old Testament. Visiting Abraham's decisions with his offspring, he describes the Biblical roots of the conflict.

    This book was interesting. It was well researched and well thought out. Wright is insightful as to what the root of the conflict is and why there is such an issue over land. It was interesting to see how the term Arab developed, and the Biblical geography. The history in it was interesting as well, and especially to see how he tied it into what is happening there today.

    Personally, this isn't my kind of book. I'd usually read anything like this, and I picked it up because it was about the Middle East, and I kinda like that place. :) Usually I read fiction, so it was a bit slow to be reading this type of book. It was good for what it is, just not something I'd pick up again. But again, just my personal reading tastes. ??If you're interested in history, Biblical or not, or the issues in the Middle East, you may enjoy this.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2011

    Good primer

    This book traces back to Genesis the ever-present conflict in the Middle East, showing how the factions stem from Abraham's two sons, Ishmael and Isaac, ancestors of Arab and Jew. Back to Abraham can be traced three major religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Wright takes half the book to lay out the story of Abraham, the Abrahamic covenant, Sarah and Hagar, Isaac and Ishmael, Isaac and Rebekah, and Esau and Jacob. If one had no familiarity with the Genesis narrative, this almost too-careful retelling by Wright might be helpful. For those well acquainted with Genesis, this first half of the book bogs down, as the author hammers and re-hammers his points for almost a hundred pages.

    The second half of the book focuses on the Jewish, Islamic and Christian perspectives of the history of the Middle East. Wright gives a clear and adequate picture of each perspective. Again, if one has little to no familiarity with each religion's perspective, Wright's writing is helpful.

    Biblical truth was communicated clearly and well. I recommend Seeds of Turmoil as a good primer with regard to Middle East conflict; it would be interesting and enlightening reading for one who knows little or nothing about the Middle East. If one wants an in-depth analysis, this is not the book to choose.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 29, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Seeds of Turmoil

    Have you ever considered the reasons why there is so much hate and mistrust in the Middle East? Bryant Wright, author of "Seeds of Turmoil", sets out to enlighten the reader of the whys and wherefores of these conflicts. The "Seeds of Turmoil", takes the reader on a journey of the Bible to find out who is involved.

    As it is soon realized, we find in Genesis, that Abram and his wife Sarai along with Sarai's Egyptian maid, Hagar, had two sons. The first born, was Ishmael, the son of Abram and Hagar, as at that time, Sarai, was barren. As the Scriptures tell, God had promised Abram and Sarai, that they would have children, or at least a son, who would become a great nation. At a very advanced age, Abram and Sarai, did have that son, Esau. I won't go into detail, here, but these two boys were polar opposites. And from these two as well as from their parents, trouble was been brewing in the Middle East ever since.
    What I have found amazing, is that the author, takes the Scriptures to explain in easy to understand as well as intelligent format, just how the Middle East became such a ground of turmoil. It's no wonder there is so much conflict. Most of the story of Abram, or Abraham as he was later named by God, can be found in the Book of Genesis. Wright, also delves into the histories and points from all sides of the issues. He does not function purely on his knowledge of the Bible, but utilizes other sources of information to glean his book, "Seeds of Turmoil". Thank you Bryant Wright for doing your homework, while researching the information and then writing it in such a spectacular way. "Seeds of Turmoil" is bound to make the Christian Best Sellers List.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 8, 2010

    A Must Read!

    Publisher, Thomas Nelson, asked me to review the book Seeds of Turmoil by Bryant Wright. This book is a scholarly and biblical look at the current crisis in the Middle East and answers many questions concerning Judaism, Islam, and Christianity and why these religions have been at war with each other throughout the ages. Wright explains the origins of these world religions, the nation of Israel, and provides the reader with political maps and explanations as to why things are the way they are. This book is both engaging and informative and reads much like an Old Testament companion. Wright delivers this information from a Christian world view, but in chapter 10 he speaks of the Islamic perspective and informs the reader as to the origin of this religion and its implications on the world, in the past and most currently.

    This book was very eye-opening in that, biblically and historically, there are definite reasons and implications as to the current crisis we are in concerning the Middle East. Towards the end of the book, Wright presents the reader with a timeline, a glossary, and study and discussion questions. This book is a very worthwhile read and it's extremely eye-opening.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 5, 2010

    Seeds of Turmoil By Bryant Wright

    Seeds of Turmoil clearly explains the biblical story of Abraham, Sarah, and Hagar and the ensuing sibling rivalry between Jacob and Esau, whose choices formed the world's three most influential religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Bryant Wright also explains the conflicts between Jewish, Christian, and Islamic perspectives and answers the question, Does God play favorites?
    I gained new insights on the religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. But I would have a hard time recommending this book to others. One of the reasons for this is that it's not a topic I am interested in. But would recommend this book to others who want to understand the above three religions more.
    By looking into history we can learn a lot about how to live better. If you are wanting a better understanding of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam then you should read this book. This book has a good balance between Biblical perspectives and the authors own thoughts.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 4, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    peace in the middle east

    I originally picked up Peace in the Middle East because perhaps like most people, I am a tad ignorant on what is going on there. For instance, it's pretty well known that the Jews occupied the Holy Land long before the Muslims - so why can't the Muslims simply recede and return the land in good faith? Author Bryant Wright answers that question for you - imagine what would happen if say. China made a decree that they felt that the original thirteen colonies in the United States were first the property of the native Americans (Indians) who lived here "first" and everyone in Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and Virginia were asked to move out. It might not go over so well.

    I have to admit that I did have higher expectations for this book - I was hoping it would be more about scholarship and higher learning. I expected something challenging and even a little thicker than 200 pages. Bryant Wright is the senior pastor of Johnson Ferry Baptist Church in Marietta, Georgia and the Founder and Chairman of Right from the Heart Ministries. He has authored four books, One Minute of Your Time, Another Minute of Your Time, One Minute of Your Day and Seeds of Turmoil (so three daily devotionals.. and a hard hitting book about the conditions in the Middle East).

    I knew something might be amiss by the three endorsements on the back cover. Andy Stanley (I like him, but understand he is an older conservative). William Lane Craig (ok, scored some points with me, he is a contemporary that I enjoy) and Alton Brown.. Yes.. Alton Brown from the food network.

    Wright starts his book much like a sermon. with scripture and his tracing back the roots of the Middle Eastern conflict to the decision Sarai made to have Abram sleep with her servant Haggar (Gen 16). Abraham is the father of Islam, Judaism and Christianity and it is these three faiths that all lay claim to his "blessing." And while I am sure this "pivotal moment" is the beginning of the unrest in the Middle East, I don't know that devoting 200 pages to explaining it is . needed.

    I guess if you are looking for something light and easy to read - something pastoral and that feels like you are sitting in church this book is a good read. If you're the kind of person who watches Andy Stanley on Sunday morning and "Good Eats" or "Iron Chef America" during the week you would like this book. I would have preferred something written by an expert or someone who has spent their lives studying this - it would not even have to be written by a religious person - in fact an unbiased person might even have new insight that I would glean from. So I can't in good faith to my readers recommend this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 1, 2010

    History of Mideast Conflict from Biblical Perspective: Interesting!

    I was interested in Seeds of Turmoil by Bryant Wright because I had recently focused more on the roots of the conflicts we have been experiencing for years. The conflicts are between the main Abrahamic Religions: Judaism, Islam and Christianity, and the lands that these Religions occupy, especially the Middle East.
    Wright traces the history of the three Religions through the Holy Books that are at their heart. All three have a common ancestor in Abraham. I have found that many people are not aware of that. Wright then describes the views and beliefs of each Religion. He admits that he is prejudiced in favor of Christianity, since he is a Christian pastor. However, he does give valuable insights into the beliefs of each and how those beliefs have historically led to conflict.
    Wright sums up his work in three questions:
    1. Does God play favorites? Wright's answer: yes. He quotes Malachi to say God favors Jacob and followers over Esau and followers.
    2. Is God unfair? Wright's answer: no. God is Patient and merciful to all.
    3. So is the Middle East Conflict God's fault? Wright's answer: no. It is humanity's fault.
    But this summation should not keep one from reading the book. There is much history and scholarship in these 222 pages. Read them if you're interested in the topic, and do a little research of your own to come to your own conclusions.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2010

    A synopsis of the book of Genesis

    Bryant Wright takes us on a journey through the book of Genesis to try to help Christians understand the roots of all the violence and strife in the Middle East. The book is thoroughly researched, and well documented. However, most of his references can be found in the book of Genesis. Towards the end of the book there is a good bit of history and facts about the prophet Muhammad, and how Islam came to be, but Wright even admits taking his information from another book, so there honestly isn't anything new here. I guess I was slightly disappointed, because the information contained in this book is mostly biblical, and is not new to me. So a simple study of scripture can bring a person to the same information as contained in this book. In fact, there are several places in this book where long portions of scripture are used to tell the story. So, perhaps one could pick up a copy of the Bible and read history for themselves. That would serve the same purpose. Overall, for someone who is not well read in scripture, this book would help them gain a basic understanding of why we have so many wars and ongoing battles in the Middle East, and why ultimately this will continue as long as it is a part of God's plan and will for the human race.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2010

    Seeds Of Turmoil

    'Seeds of Turmoil', The biblical roots of the inevitable crisis in the Middle East by Bryant Wright, provides one with a detailed perspective on the history of the unrest in the Middle East. Most people are aware of the tension In the Middle East but do not actually know about the background of the conflict. It is the history of Abraham, Isaac and Ishmael, the founder fathers of three great religions and the actual source of all present day conflicts and chaos. 'Seeds of Turmoil' enlightens one as to the extent of the role played by each, even though Abraham is the prime character, we get the full picture of the issue at hand. We are also enlightened about the historical, theological and religious aspects of this unending present day conflict. We may not be able to offer any possible solution to this crisis but at least we know how it came into being.

    'Seeds of Turmoil' is an excellent book covering a very active topic. A must read for people who seek a deeper understanding of the issues around them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 25, 2010

    Excellent

    Bryant Wright's book entitled Seeds of Turmoil, The biblical roots of the inevitable crisis in the Middle East provided a detailed perspective on the history of the unrest in the Middle East. I found this book very helpful in understanding the historic culture of the areas we see labeled on maps as Israel, Palestine, etc. Wright also goes into clear detail of what cultural impacts many readers of the Bible may not know.

    One of the refreshing parts of this book is when the author gives a current day example of a point he is referencing in biblical times. This helps to recapture the mind and attention span during the weight of heavy details.

    This book would be an excellent resource for anyone wanting a deeper understanding of the history of the Middle East. It reads quicker and easier than historical textbooks and offers an understanding brought to us through the history written about in the Bible. Good job Wright!

    The publisher provided a free copy of this book for me in exchange for an honest review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)