Seeing Red: The True Story of Blood by Tanya Lloyd Kyi, Steve Rolston |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Seeing Red: The True Story of Blood
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Seeing Red: The True Story of Blood

by Tanya Lloyd Kyi, Steve Rolston
     
 

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What do we really know about the vital stuff in our veins?

Some people faint at the sight of blood while others eat black pudding or sip blood soup. Some can't think of it without hearing the faint rustle of a vampire's cape. Others rush to see the latest gory horror film. Why does blood hold such emotional power?

Around the world, blood has

Overview

What do we really know about the vital stuff in our veins?

Some people faint at the sight of blood while others eat black pudding or sip blood soup. Some can't think of it without hearing the faint rustle of a vampire's cape. Others rush to see the latest gory horror film. Why does blood hold such emotional power?

Around the world, blood has always been a symbol of both life and death: blood rites, blood oaths, and blood-soaked legends. Today, we have scientific facts about blood types, transfusions, blood-borne illnesses, and crime-scene blood spatter. Yet the fluid still holds mystery.

Open this book to learn about the symbolism and reality of blood, from its role in ancient sacrifices to its uses in modern medicine and forensics.

Striking black-and-red illustrations appear throughout, with each chapter introduced in comic-book style by young Harker, a goth narrator with a worrisome relish for all things bloody. As Seeing Red reveals, blood continues to make us cringe while holding us in its thrall.

Editorial Reviews

Library Media Connection - Patricia Walsh
This book explores blood in a way that will have readers cringing (in a good way). It does not look at blood in the biological sense, but instead it investigates how blood is vital in our history, culture, and religion. The book includes chapters about rituals involving blood, rites of passage, drinking blood, family ties, and blood types. The reader learns all about blood from the narrator, Harker, a teenage boy who happens to know a lot about the topic. The book is written in black and red and has comic-style pictures and the text is written humorously so that it is informative and entertaining. This book would be useful as a research tool, but it is also a good book to just learn some facts about how blood is treated around the world. It's a bloody good read! RECOMMENDED
Science Books and Film - Olen R. Brown
If you are up for all aspects of the subject from the weird to the scientific, this book is for you.
CM
Kyi's matter of fact, macabre style is very effective in drawing readers (especially reluctant ones) to her text.
The Winnipeg Review - KC Dyer
This book is a gem -- packed with bloody trivia, historical tidbits and presented in a contemporary graphic novel-like format that will appeal to even the most squeamish of teens.
Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
Why are there so many crime scene investigation shows on television? Perhaps one answer to that question is mankind's fascination with violence and bloodshed. It is that fascination that Tanya Lloyd Kyi pursues in Seeing Red. Written and illustrated in a somewhat irreverent style, Seeing Red is designed to take readers on a journey through time to learn how human beings express their fascination with blood. Kyi includes anecdotes, scientific studies, crime scene stories, and forensic research in a way that combines information with playfulness. As a story within a story, illustrator Steve Rolston not only provides accompanying imagery but also an ongoing comic art vampire story very loosely based on the Dracula saga. This approach works and yields a lively yet educational book that will appeal to middle school aged readers. One cautionary note, the irreverence may well test the limits of some adults. For example, the inclusion of illustrations depicting gang members and blood filled bathtubs, with accompanying storylines, may limit the sale of this book due to adult preference and policy. The toning down of a few such entries could expand the marketability of the book and thereby allow more students to learn from and enjoy it. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
School Library Journal
Gr 4–7—Facts about capillaries or circulation are the type of information one might expect in a book on this topic. Instead, Kyi's title combines science, history, and pop culture. She examines how blood has been used in ritual and religion, its meaning to various cultures, and how knowledge about it has developed over time while incorporating all the sensational details that the subject allows. There is a certain irreverence inherent in both the text and cartoons amid discussions of symbols such as the blood of Christ. Frequent insets, along with a graphic narrative, feature tongue-in-cheek responses to the text and the story of Harker, a teen boy who teams up with a vampire girl to research blood. His notes and experiences become an additional focus and maximize appeal. Red highlights include blood-filled syringes, puddles, and platelets. Such topics as menstrual blood, blood as food, medical misconceptions, and breakthroughs are delivered under numerous pithy headings presented in drippy typography. Readers are connected to the information with contemporary colloquialisms and media references including Buffy and Sweeney Todd, Bella and Katniss, and actual and fictional CSI. Terry Deary's "Horrible Histories" (Scholastic) and the "You Wouldn't Want To… " series (Watts) come to mind and appear as suggestions for further reading. Impressive is the list of sources in this fully indexed work. This book is likely to be selected for the graphics, with the additional benefit of solid, if provocative, information.—Janet S. Thompson, Chicago Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
An irreverent if anemic survey of the red stuff's roles in human culture, from Galen to the Twilight series. The information is presented beneath drippy red borders and splattered with both jokey cartoon illustrations and graphic-novel style episodes featuring a hoodie-clad researcher who hooks up with a hot young vampire. Kyi's report opens with a slashing overview of early medical theories about the circulatory system and closes with superficial speculations about why The Hunger Games and news stories about violent crimes are so popular. In between, it strings together generalities about blood rites in cultures from Matausa to our own Armed Forces and religions from Roman Catholicism to Santeria. The author also takes stabs at blood-based foods, the use of blood (particularly menstrual blood) in magic and modern forensic science, medical bloodletting, hereditary hemophilia in Europe's ruling class, vampirism, and other topics in the same vein. But readers seeking at least a basic transfusion of information about blood's physical functions or component elements will come away empty. Moreover, the trickle of specific facts doesn't extend to, for instance, naming the site of a prehistoric sacrifice stone on which traces of gore have been found or even, despite repeated reference to blood types, actually identifying--much less discussing--them. A colorful but superficial ooze of anthropology, with a few drops of biology mixed in. (further reading, sources, index) (Nonfiction. 11-13)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781554513840
Publisher:
Annick Press, Limited
Publication date:
02/28/2012
Pages:
122
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
10 - 18 Years

Meet the Author

Tanya Lloyd Kyi is the author of numerous books for young readers, including The Lowdown on Denim and 50 Burning Questions: A Sizzling History of Fire. She lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Steve Rolston is an award-winning comic book and graphic novel artist. He also illustrated The Great Motion Mission. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

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