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Seeing Symmetry
     

Seeing Symmetry

by Loreen Leedy
 

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Once you start looking, you can find symmetry all around you. It's in words and even letters. It's in both nature and man-made things. In fact, art, decoration, and buildings are full of it. This clear and concise book explains different types of symmetry and shows you how to spot them make your own symmetrical masterpieces. Notes and a glossary are included, as

Overview

Once you start looking, you can find symmetry all around you. It's in words and even letters. It's in both nature and man-made things. In fact, art, decoration, and buildings are full of it. This clear and concise book explains different types of symmetry and shows you how to spot them make your own symmetrical masterpieces. Notes and a glossary are included, as well as activities that show kids how to make their own symmetrical masterpieces.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
Helping students learn to "see" is an exciting part of being an art educator. Seeing Symmetry explores symmetry as a link between art, science and math. Symmetry exists all around us, in the yard, flying above us, and in plain site. But what is it? The author uses an illustration of folded paper to explain the concept of symmetry as well as images of planes, teddy bears, arrows and sea turtles. Animals as different as scallops, toads and whales all have bodies with symmetry. To make the point more personal, human bodies are symmetrical, too. Even letters can be horizontally or vertically symmetrical. Radial symmetry is referred to as rotating symmetry with images of flowers and pinwheels illustrating the concept. Why do animal bodies have symmetry? It helps them crawl, swim, walk, run and fly. The author/illustrator has included many examples of symmetry in art: totem poles, Chinese lattice, Mexican paper cutting and medieval stained glass. Symmetry is an important math concept because it is relevant to the study of patterns, order and comparison. Symmetry is an important concept visible in art, nature and math. Reviewer: Kristin Harris
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Using an abundance of colorful, eye-catching computer-generated illustrations and simple descriptive phrases and sentences with key words that pop out in large red lowercase type, Leedy introduces the concept of symmetry. She describes the two types—line and rotational—and their application to animals and nature; the human body; art; letters of the alphabet and words; architecture; and common items. Prompts at the bottom of many pages refer readers to the two pages of appended explanatory notes. Instructions for two activities and an explanation of why symmetry is an important concept in mathematics are included. A publisher's note states that the book "…meets the Common Core State Standards for fourth-grade mathematics in geometry" regarding identification of line-symmetric figures. While the picture-book format belies the sophistication of the subject, Leedy has provided a clear and detailed explanation of a core mathematical concept that will be useful in classrooms. Lynn Peppas's Symmetry (Crabtree, 2009) has simpler text, partially in story format. Nancy Kelly Allen's Is It Symmetrical? (Rourke, 2011) is a very simple introduction to line symmetry. Both are for younger children.—Susan Scheps, formerly at Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
An entertaining assortment of dozens of diverse and colorful examples from quilts to kites to cupcakes invites the reader to discover both line and rotational symmetry. The cleverly designed cover and title page provide an example of "flip" or mirror symmetry right off the mark. The book moves on to a clear and simple explanation of the line of symmetry--an image of a folded-paper sea turtle is followed by an image of a real sea turtle--and provides many examples, including individual letters and even words that exhibit symmetry. Leedy moves on to a discussion of rotational symmetry, with various spinning designs. Throughout, the approach is clear, direct, simple and encouraging. One double-page spread of holiday symbols and decorations seems unnecessarily narrow and a bit commercialized, but overall, the layout, diagrams, font sizes and use of color set this overall above a mere textbook treatment. The backmatter reinforces the lesson with the following: two pages of notes provide extensive discussions of the specific forms of symmetry in the main text, and there are two activities (folded shape cutting and a folded paint-blot design), a brief glossary ("Symmetry Words") repeating the vocabulary and concepts introduced in the text and a one-page discussion of the importance of symmetry in math. Useful and accessible. (Informational picture book. 4-8)
From the Publisher

"Leedy has provided a clear and detailed explanation of a core mathematical concept that will be useful in classrooms."

"Kids will be drawn to this colorful book for the challenge and fun of it all."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823423606
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
02/01/2012
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,365,493
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
640L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

Meet the Author

Loreen Leedy has written and illustrated more than thirty books for children, including Look at My Book and The Great Graph Contest, which School Library Journal praised as "exciting and energetic" in a starred review. She lives in central Florida.

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