Seeing Voices: A Journey into the World of the Deaf

Seeing Voices: A Journey into the World of the Deaf

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by Oliver Sacks
     
 

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The bestselling author and "one of the greatest clinical writers of the twentieth century" (New York Times) explores the world of deafness and ponders the nature of human communication.  See more details below

Overview

The bestselling author and "one of the greatest clinical writers of the twentieth century" (New York Times) explores the world of deafness and ponders the nature of human communication.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Sacks (neurology, Einstein College of Medicine, and well-known as the author of The Man who mistook his wife for a hat) discusses the history, culture, and language of deaf people in the US. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From the Publisher
"This book will shake your preconceptions about the deaf, about language and about thought—. Sacks [is] one of the finest and most thoughtful writers of our time."—Los Angeles Times Book Review

"Fascinating and richly rewarding—. Sacks is a profoundly wise observer."—The Plain Dealer

"One cannot read more than a few pages of Sacks without seeing something in a new way. His breadth of understanding and expression seems limitless."—Kansas City Star

"A remarkable book, penetrating, subtle, persuasive—. [It] will likely become a classic."—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559942775
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/01/1990
Edition description:
Abridged

Meet the Author

Oliver Sacks was a neurologist, writer, and professor of medicine. Born in London in 1933, he moved to New York City in 1965, where he launched his medical career and began writing case studies of his patients. Called the “poet laureate of medicine” by The New York Times, Sacks is the author of thirteen books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Musicophilia, and Awakenings, which inspired an Oscar-nominated film and a play by Harold Pinter. He was the recipient of many awards and honorary degrees, and was made a Commander of the British Empire in 2008 for services to medicine. He died in 2015.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
New York, New York
Date of Birth:
1933
Place of Birth:
London, England
Education:
B.M., B.Ch., Queen's College, Oxford, 1958

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Seeing Voices: A Journey Into the World of the Deaf 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Tunguz More than 1 year ago
Most of the information that we get about the world comes through the sense of sight. Therefore it would seem that it there is one sense that we would be loath to part with, it would be this one. And yet, it is the sense of hearing that has the greatest impact on the acquisition of language and subsequently on the formation of our minds. If we don't acquire language really early on in our lives, we are bound to lead a very limited existence as compared to most other people. It is these facts and some other very deep and important ones that I was able to gather from this Oliver Sacks book. It really opened my mind to the world of deaf people in a profoundly different way. Sacks documents various attempts over the last few centuries to give deaf people a chance to acquire a sign language, and different approaches to the education of the deaf. The book also opened my eyes to the fact that the sign language is a real language, qualitatively and profoundly different from simple gesticulations and gestures that we engage on a daily basis in our regular communications. In fact, the sign language is in one sense much more complex than the regular spoken language. One can argue that the spoken language is one-dimensional - it consists of sounds of different pitch and duration in time. On the other hand, the sign language is four-dimensional - it employs all three dimensions of space to create various hand configurations and adds an extra layer in the form of motion. One of the greatest features of Olives Sacks' writing is the highly sophisticated and literary style that he employs. I would love reading his books even if he were describing the content of a box of cereal. We are fortunate that his writing brilliance is matched with the vast knowledge and expertise that he has in neuroscience. It is this incredible combination of writing and scientific talent that makes each of his books a masterpiece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago