Seeing with Their Hearts: Chicago Women and the Vision of the Good City, 1871-1933 / Edition 1

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Overview

"This book is a major achievement that brilliantly weaves history and historiography into a seamless narrative of Chicago women's political activism from the Great Fire of 1871 to the New Deal. Reevaluating the ways in which we understand the roles of women in public life, it poses a provocative challenge to the field of American social history. It may become one of those pivotal books that change how we look at the history of cities, politics, race, and class."—Harold Platt, author of The Electric City

"Seeing with Their Hearts is significant as both a case study and a synthesis of current work on women's roles in Progressive politics. It forces a retelling of the standard political history of cities during the Progressive Era, showing that women activists pursued an independent agenda that must be taken into account if the era is to be understood."—Ann Keating, author of Building Chicago

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Editorial Reviews

Choice
An important book on activist women's perspectives on the modern city. . . . Flanagan's study will become a new model for studying urban and women's history.
H-Net Reviews
This is a well-written and illuminating study of women reformers in Chicago. . . . Flanagan clearly has done extensive work with often under-utilized sources, bringing to light the world of activist women in the early twentieth-century city.
— Elizabeth Jozwiak
Reviews in American History
Grounded in exhaustive research. . . . Flanagan's book contributes to historiographical debates over urban development, municipal politics, and women's contribution to both. Women may have failed in their attempts to transform Chicago 'from the City of Big Shoulders into a City of Homes.' Flanagan, however, succeeds in telling us why.
— Thomas Winter
Journal of American History
In this well-researched book with a cast of thousands, Maureen A. Flanagan accomplishes several important historiographical tasks relevant not just to Chicago history but to a larger understanding of the wellsprings of Progressive reform campaigns.
— Mina Carson
American Historical Review
[A] solid, deeply researched, and rewarded book.
— Pamela Tyler
H-Net Reviews - Elizabeth Jozwiak
This is a well-written and illuminating study of women reformers in Chicago. . . . Flanagan clearly has done extensive work with often under-utilized sources, bringing to light the world of activist women in the early twentieth-century city.
Reviews in American History - Thomas Winter
Grounded in exhaustive research. . . . Flanagan's book contributes to historiographical debates over urban development, municipal politics, and women's contribution to both. Women may have failed in their attempts to transform Chicago 'from the City of Big Shoulders into a City of Homes.' Flanagan, however, succeeds in telling us why.
Journal of American History - Mina Carson
In this well-researched book with a cast of thousands, Maureen A. Flanagan accomplishes several important historiographical tasks relevant not just to Chicago history but to a larger understanding of the wellsprings of Progressive reform campaigns.
American Historical Review - Pamela Tyler
[A] solid, deeply researched, and rewarded book.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 2003 Superior Achievement Award, Illinois State Historical Society

One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2003

"An important book on activist women's perspectives on the modern city. . . . Flanagan's study will become a new model for studying urban and women's history."—
Choice

"This is a well-written and illuminating study of women reformers in Chicago. . . . Flanagan clearly has done extensive work with often under-utilized sources, bringing to light the world of activist women in the early twentieth-century city."—Elizabeth Jozwiak, H-Net Reviews

"Grounded in exhaustive research. . . . Flanagan's book contributes to historiographical debates over urban development, municipal politics, and women's contribution to both. Women may have failed in their attempts to transform Chicago 'from the City of Big Shoulders into a City of Homes.' Flanagan, however, succeeds in telling us why."—Thomas Winter, Reviews in American History

"In this well-researched book with a cast of thousands, Maureen A. Flanagan accomplishes several important historiographical tasks relevant not just to Chicago history but to a larger understanding of the wellsprings of Progressive reform campaigns."—Mina Carson, Journal of American History

"[A] solid, deeply researched, and rewarded book."—Pamela Tyler, American Historical Review

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691095394
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 9/9/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 328
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.62 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures ix
List of Acronyms xi
Acknowledgments xiii
Introduction
City of Big Shoulders or City of Homes?
Re-envisioning Urban History 1
PART ONE: CRAFTING THE VISION
Chapter One
"The Whole Work has been Committed to the Hands of Women"
Women Respond to the Fire of 1871 13
Chapter Two
"Thoughtful Women Are Needed"
Forming Groups and Forging Alliances 31
PART TWO: EXPANDING THE VISION
Chapter Three
"The First Thing Is to Create Public Sentiment and Then Express It at Every Opportunity"
The Growth of Progressive Activism 55
Chapter Four
"The Welfare of the Community Requires the Admission of Women to Full Citizenship"
The Campaign for Municipal Suffrage, 1896-1912 73
Chapter Five
"To Bring Together Women Interested in Promoting the Welfare of the City"
The Expansion of Women's Municipal Work, 1910-16 85
PART THREE: CAMPAIGNING FOR THE VISION
Chapter Six
"I Do Not Think the Husband Will Influence the Wife's Vote in Municipal Affairs"
Women as Voters and Potential Officeholders, 1913-19 123
Chapter Seven
"Looking Out for the Interests of the People"
Municipal Activism through the 1920s 145
Chapter Eight
"I Am the Only Woman on Their Entire Ticket"
The End of an Era 175
Conclusion
Chicago Remains the City of Big Shoulders 193
Appendixes 203
Notes 219
Bibliography 287
Index 305

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Recipe

"This book is a major achievement that brilliantly weaves history and historiography into a seamless narrative of Chicago women's political activism from the Great Fire of 1871 to the New Deal. Reevaluating the ways in which we understand the roles of women in public life, it poses a provocative challenge to the field of American social history. It may become one of those pivotal books that change how we look at the history of cities, politics, race, and class."—Harold Platt, author of The Electric City

"Seeing with Their Hearts is significant as both a case study and a synthesis of current work on women's roles in Progressive politics. It forces a retelling of the standard political history of cities during the Progressive Era, showing that women activists pursued an independent agenda that must be taken into account if the era is to be understood."—Ann Keating, author of Building Chicago

Read More Show Less

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