Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow

Segregating Sound: Inventing Folk and Pop Music in the Age of Jim Crow

by Karl Hagstrom Miller
     
 


A cultural history describing how folklore studies and the music industry helped to create a musical color line in the South, associating certain genres with particular racial and ethnic identities.See more details below

Overview


A cultural history describing how folklore studies and the music industry helped to create a musical color line in the South, associating certain genres with particular racial and ethnic identities.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780822347002
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books
Publication date:
02/11/2010
Series:
Refiguring American Music Series
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments VII

Introduction 1

1 Tin Pan Alley on tour 23

The Southern Embrace of Commercial Music

2 Making Money Making Music 51

The Education of Southern Musicians in Local Markets

3 Isolating Folk, Isolating Songs 85

Reimagining Southern Music as Folklore

4 Southern Musicians and the Lure of New York City 121

Representing the South from Coon Songs to the Blues

5 Talking Machine World 157

Discovering Local Music in the Global Phonograph Industry

6 Race Records and old-time Music 187

The Creation of Two Marketing Categories in the 1920s

7 Black Folk and Hillbilly Pop 215

Industry Enforcement of the Musical Color Line

8 Reimagining Pop Tunes as Folk Songs 241

The Ascension of the Folkloric Paradigm

Afterword "All Songs is Folk Songs" 275

Notes 283

Bibliography 327

Index 351

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