Segregation In Federally Subsidized Low-Income Housing In The United States

Overview

Earlier studies of subsidized housing assume that segregation is a manifestation of white prejudice, and that the Fair Housing Act of 1968 would significantly remedy inequalities in housing and, in the process, narrow the socioeconomic gap between racial groups. This book argues, on the contrary, that segregation by race and income has been an integral part of federal housing policy from its inception and that white prejudice merely obscures the federal government's role in ...

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Overview

Earlier studies of subsidized housing assume that segregation is a manifestation of white prejudice, and that the Fair Housing Act of 1968 would significantly remedy inequalities in housing and, in the process, narrow the socioeconomic gap between racial groups. This book argues, on the contrary, that segregation by race and income has been an integral part of federal housing policy from its inception and that white prejudice merely obscures the federal government's role in maintaining segregation.

Despite formal claims of providing decent, safe, and sanitary housing for the poor, the authors show how federal low-income housing programs have been used as instruments of urban renewal while doing little to realize their formal goals. The authors use a historical and statistical review of federally subsidized low-rent housing to demonstrate their thesis.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The authors look at the patterns and trends in both racial occupancy and income dispersal of subsidized housing projects during the period 1932-1992. They show that segregation by race and income has been an integral element of the federal housing policy from its inception, and that subjective factors such as white prejudice and associated individual discrimination merely obscure the role of the federal government in creating and maintaining segregation. They also examine whether the patterns changed as a result of the civil rights legislation of the 1960s. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

MODIBO COULIBALY is a Research Assistant in the Department of Economics at Howard University.

RODNEY D. GREEN is Professor of Economics at Howard University.

DAVID M. JAMES is on the faculty at Howard University.

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Table of Contents

Tables
Preface
1 Introduction 1
2 Housing, History, and Schools of Thought 5
3 Development of Low-Income Housing in the United States 23
4 Research Procedure 43
5 Patterns of Segregation in Low-Income Housing, 1932-1963 63
6 Patterns of Racial Segregation and Economic Isolation, 1964-1992 101
7 Trends in Subsidized Housing Segregation 123
8 Summary and Conclusion 131
Appendix 135
Selected Bibliography 139
Index 151
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