Seleção Do Brasil, Vol. 1: Acoustic Brasilian Tunes

Seleção Do Brasil, Vol. 1: Acoustic Brasilian Tunes

     
 
Seleção Do Brasil, Vol. 1: Acoustic Brasilian Tunes, put out by French music distributor Wagram, is a little deceiving in its title. While the songs, for the most part, are performed on acoustic instruments, so is much of Brazilian music in general. So that descriptor adds very little, especially considering the fact that there are some songs on the record that

Overview

Seleção Do Brasil, Vol. 1: Acoustic Brasilian Tunes, put out by French music distributor Wagram, is a little deceiving in its title. While the songs, for the most part, are performed on acoustic instruments, so is much of Brazilian music in general. So that descriptor adds very little, especially considering the fact that there are some songs on the record that include electric instruments (albeit softly played) as well, like the guitar and scratching on the rather kitschy "Freestyle Love" by Stereo Maracanã, the keyboards on Paula Lima's "Tive Razão" (written "Tiv Razão" on the album), or the synthesizers and sound effects in Orlandivo's "Ondo Anda a Meu Amor." Perhaps a more accurate description would instead be "Generally Light and Relaxing Brasilian Tunes," because that would at least allow for these things to occur. There seems to be a focus on more contemporary musicians (Celso Fonseca, Claudia Telles, Seu Jorge), or at least those important figures who are still recording with relative frequency (Jorge Ben, Chico Buarque, Joyce), though, once again, this is not an all-inclusive theme, as there are also tracks from Wilson Simonal and Baden Powell (who died in 1980 and 2000, respectively). But despite the lack of consistency (and lack of songs from Caetano Veloso, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Elis Regina, and Alcione, for example, all of whom have music that would fit just as well, "acoustically," as anything else on the record), Seleção Do Brasil, Vol. 1 still manages to turn into a pretty decent record. The opener, Ben's "Carolina Carol Bela," is fantastic, as is what immediately follows, "Convite Para Vida" by Seu Jorge, which was originally on the City of God soundtrack. There are a few weak, loungey, bossa nova songs in the middle that aren't particularly inspiring, but toward the end of the album, when Arakatuba's "Riva" comes in, things begin to pick up a bit, and by the time Chico Buarque finishes the last notes in his version of Vinicius de Moraes' "Carta Aõ Tom 74," it's easy to forget all the discrepancies and just enjoy the music.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/02/2005
Label:
Wagram Records
UPC:
0667344394129
catalogNumber:
310576
Rank:
249853

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >