Selected Poems

Selected Poems

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by Gwendolyn Brooks
     
 

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The classic volume by the distinguished modern poet and winner of the 1950 Pulitzer Prize that represents her technical mastery, her compassionate and illuminating response to a world that is both special and universal, and her warm humanity.

Author Biography: Gwendolyn Brooks was born in 1917. Her books include A Street in Bronzeville, Annie Allen, The Bean

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Overview

The classic volume by the distinguished modern poet and winner of the 1950 Pulitzer Prize that represents her technical mastery, her compassionate and illuminating response to a world that is both special and universal, and her warm humanity.

Author Biography: Gwendolyn Brooks was born in 1917. Her books include A Street in Bronzeville, Annie Allen, The Bean Eaters, Maud Martha, and In the Mecca.

Editorial Reviews

Christian Science Monitor
From her poet's craft bursts a whole gallery of wholly alive persons...Many a novelist cannot do so well in ten times the space.
New York Times
When Miss Brooks...writes out of her heart, out of her rich and living background, out of her very real talent, then she induces almost unbearable excitement.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060931742
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/07/1999
Series:
Harper Perennial
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
160
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

Gwendolyn Brooks (1917-2000) is the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Annie Allen and one of the most celebrated African American poets. She was Poet Laureate for the state of Illinois, a National Women's Hall of Fame inductee, and a recipient of a lifetime achievement award from the National Endowment for the Arts. She received fifty honorary degrees. Her other books include A Street in Bronzeville, In the Mecca, The Bean Eaters, and Maud Martha.

Read an Excerpt

A Street in Bronzeville

to David and Keziab Brooks

kitchenette building

We are things of dry hours and the involuntary plan,
Grayed in, and gray. "Dream" makes a giddy sound, not strong
Like "rent," "feeding a wife," "satisfying a man."

But could a dream send up through onion fumes
Its white and violet, fight with fried potatoes
And yesterday's garbage ripening in the hall,
Flutter, or sing an aria down these rooms

Even if we were willing to let it in,
Had time to warm it, keep it very clean,
Anticipate a message, let it begin?

We wonder. But not well! not for a minute!
Since Number Five is out of the bathroom now,
We think of lukewarm water, hope to get in it.

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