Self-Organization, Computational Maps, and Motor Control

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$210.10
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $56.46
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 79%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (2) from $56.46   
  • New (1) from $252.26   
  • Used (1) from $56.46   

Overview

In the study of the computational structure of biological/robotic sensorimotor systems, distributed models have gained center stage in recent years, with a range of issues including self-organization, non-linear dynamics, field computing etc. This multidisciplinary research area is addressed here by a multidisciplinary team of contributors, who provide a balanced set of articulated presentations which include reviews, computational models, simulation studies, psychophysical, and neurophysiological experiments.

The book is divided into three parts, each characterized by a slightly different focus: in part I, the major theme concerns computational maps which typically model cortical areas, according to a view of the sensorimotor cortex as "geometric engine" and the site of "internal models" of external spaces. Part II also addresses problems of self-organization and field computing, but in a simpler computational architecture which, although lacking a specialized cortical machinery, can still behave in a very adaptive and surprising way by exploiting the interaction with the real world. Finally part III is focused on the motor control issues related to the physical properties of muscular actuators and the dynamic interactions with the world.

The reader will find different approaches on controversial issues, such as the role and nature of force fields, the need for internal representations, the nature of invariant commands, the vexing question about coordinate transformations, the distinction between hierachiacal and bi-directional modelling, and the influence of muscle stiffness.

In the study of the computational structure of biological/robotic sensorimotor systems, distributed models have gained center stage in recent years, with a range of issues including self-organization, non-linear dynamics, field computing etc. This multidisciplinary research area is addressed here by a multidisciplinary team of contributors, who provide a balanced set of articulated presentations which include reviews, computational models, simulation studies, psychophysical, and neurophysiological experiments.

The book is divided into three parts, each characterized by a slightly different focus: in part I, the major theme concerns computational maps which typically model cortical areas, according to a view of the sensorimotor cortex as "geometric engine" and the site of "internal models" of external spaces. Part II also addresses problems of self-organization and field computing, but in a simpler computational architecture which, although lacking a specialized cortical machinery, can still behave in a very adaptive and surprising way by exploiting the interaction with the real world. Finally part III is focused on the motor control issues related to the physical properties of muscular actuators and the dynamic interactions with the world.

The reader will find different approaches on controversial issues, such as the role and nature of force fields, the need for internal representations, the nature of invariant commands, the vexing question about coordinate transformations, the distinction between hierachiacal and bi-directional modelling, and the influence of muscle stiffness

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Contributors from a variety of fields report research on distributed models as an approach to understanding the computational structure of biological and robotic sensorimotor systems. They consider computational maps, which typically model cortical areas by considering the sensorimotor cortex a geometric engine and the site of internal models of external spaces; problems of self-organization and field-computing in a simplified computational architecture that, though lacking a specialized cortical machinery, can still behave in an adaptive manner by exploiting the interaction with the real world; and motor control issues related to the physical properties of muscular actuators and the dynamic interactions with the world. Reproduced from typescripts, many double spaced. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780444823236
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
  • Publication date: 4/2/1997
  • Series: Advances in Psychology Series , #119
  • Pages: 656
  • Product dimensions: 1.50 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I Cortical maps of sensorimotor spaces (V. Sanguineti et al.). Field computation in motor control (B. MacLennan). A probability interpretation of neural population coding for movement (T. Sanger). Computational models of sensorimotor integration (Z. Ghahramani et al.). How relevant are subcortical maps for the cortical machinery? An hypothesis based on parametric study of extra-relay afferents to primary sensory areas (D. Minciacchi, A. Granato). Part II.Artificial force-field based methods in robotics (T. Tsuji et al.). Learning Newtownian mechanics (F.A. Mussa Ivaldi, E. Bizzi). Motor intelligence in a simple distributed control system: walking machines and stick insects (H. Cruse, J. Dean). The dynamic neural field theory of motor programming: arm and eye movements (G. Schöner et al.). Network models in motor control and music (A. Camurri). Part III. Human arm impedance in multi-joint movement (T. Tsuji). Neural Models for flexible control of redundant systems (F.H. Guenthner, D. Micci Barreca). Models of motor adaptation and impedance control in human arm movements (T. Flash, I. Gurevich). Control of human arm and jaw motion: issues related to musculo-skeletal geometry (P.L. Gribble et al.). Computational maps and target fields for reaching movements (V. Sanguineti, P. Morasso). From cortical maps to the control of muscles (P. Morasso, V. Sanguineti). Learning to speak: speech production and sensori-motor representations (G. Bailly, et al.). Author Index. Subject Index.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)