Self-Taught

Overview

With great skill, Heather Williams demonstrates the centrality of black people to the process of formal education - the establish-ment of schools, the creation of a cadre of teachers, the forging of standards of literacy and numeracy - in the post-emancipation years. As she does, Williams makes the case that the issue of education informed the Reconstruction period - the two-cornered struggle between North and South over the rebuilding of Southern society, the three-cornered struggle between white Northerners, ...
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Overview

With great skill, Heather Williams demonstrates the centrality of black people to the process of formal education - the establish-ment of schools, the creation of a cadre of teachers, the forging of standards of literacy and numeracy - in the post-emancipation years. As she does, Williams makes the case that the issue of education informed the Reconstruction period - the two-cornered struggle between North and South over the rebuilding of Southern society, the three-cornered struggle between white Northerners, white Southerners, and black people over the nature of education, and the less well known contest between black Northerners and black Southerners over the direction of African American culture. Self-Taught is a work of major significance.'' IRA BERLIN University of Maryland..... ''Self-Taught is not merely the most comprehensive documentation and analysis of African American education in the South during the 18611871 period, it is in every respect the first definitive study of the formative stages of universal literacy and formal education among ex-slaves. Never before has anyone described so fully the broad range of roles and the significant contributions of African Americans to the development of formal and public education in the South for themselves and for the entire region.'' JAMES D. ANDERSON University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442995246
  • Publisher: ReadHowYouWant, LLC
  • Publication date: 6/2/2009
  • Edition number: 16
  • Pages: 704
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.41 (d)

Table of Contents

Self-Taught:

African American Education in Slavery and Freedom

by Heather Andrea Williams

The University of North Carolina Press

Chapel Hill and London

[copyright]

© 2004 The University of North Carolina Press

All rights reserved

Manufactured in the United States of America

The paper in this book meets the guidelines for permanence and durability of the Committee on Production Guidelines for Book Longevity of the Council on Library Resources.

Parts of this book have been reprinted with permission in revised form from the following works: Southern Manhood: Perspectives on Masculinity in the Old South, edited by Craig Thompson Friend and Lorri Glover (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2004); and "'Clothing Themselves in Intelligence': The Freedpeople, Schooling, and Northern Teachers, 1861-1871," Journal of African American History 87 (Fall 2002): 372-90.

ISBN 0-8078-2920-X (cloth: alk. paper)

08 07 06 05 04 5 4 3 2 1

[contents]

—>
Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

1 In Secret Places: Acquiring Literacy in Slave Communities

2 A Coveted Possession: Literacy in the First Days of Freedom

3 The Men Are Actually Clamoring for Books: African American Soldiers and the Educational Mission

4 We Must Get Education for Ourselves and Our Children: Advocacy for Education

5 We Are Striving to Dwo Buisness on Our Own Hook: Organizing Schools on the Ground

6 We Are Laboring under Many Difficulties: African American Teachers in Freedpeople's Schools

7 A Long and Tedious Road to Travel for Knowledge: Textbooks and Freedpeople's Schools

8 If Anybody Wants an Education, It Is Me: Students in Freedpeople's Schools

9 First Movings of the Waters: The Creation of Common School Systems for Black and White Students

Epilogue

Appendix: African Americans, Literacy, and the Law in the Antebellum South

Notes

Bibliography

Index

Illustrations

Newspaper advertisement offering a reward for the capture of a slave

Letter from Margaret Adams to the American Missionary Association, May 9, 1864

Students with teacher, James Heywood Blackwell

Jackson as a slave and then as a drummer in the Union army

Three boys

Schoolboys at Laura Towne's Penn School, St. Helena Island, South Carolina

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