A Semiotic Theory Of Language

Overview

"... one of the most significant books in the field of theoretical linguistics... will become a classic... " —Adam Makkai, University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Taking issue with Transformational Grammar Theory, Shaumyan separates language from psychology, arguing that language occupies a different world, that of the semiotic.

Indiana University Press

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Overview

"... one of the most significant books in the field of theoretical linguistics... will become a classic... " —Adam Makkai, University of Illinois at Chicago Circle

Taking issue with Transformational Grammar Theory, Shaumyan separates language from psychology, arguing that language occupies a different world, that of the semiotic.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253304728
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/1987
  • Series: Advances in Semiotics Series
  • Pages: 372
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface

I. The Aim and Structure of the Semiotic Theory of Language

1. A Semiotic Definition of Language
2. The Principle of Semiotic Relevance and Homonymy
3. Saussure’s Notion of the Sign
4. Linguistics as a Part of Semiotics
5. The Goals of Linguistic Theory and the Semiotic Basis of Abstraction
6. Synchronic Linguistics and Diachronic Linguistics
7. Language Variation
8. The Semiotic versus Generativist Notion of Language

II. Phonology

1. The Phoeneme and Distinctive Features
2. Physical and Functional Segmentation of the Speech Flow
3. Further Problems of Functional Identity
4. Distinctive Features and Experimental Phonetics
5. Phonological Antinomies
6. Some Misconceptions about the Phonological Antinomies
7. Remarks on Bohr’s Complementarity Principle and Dialectics
8. An Illustration: How the Functional View of Speech Sounds Gave Birth to One of the Greatest Discoveries in the History of Linguistics
9. Alternative Theories of the Phoneme and the Distinctive Features
10. Phonological Syntagmatics
10.1 Phonological Units
10.2 Are Monovocalic Phonological Systems Possible?
10.3 Phonological Structure of the Syllable
10.4 The Primary and Secondary Functions of Vowels and Consonants in the Syllable
10.5 Comments on the Notion ‘Extrasyllabic Consonant’
10.6 Prosodic Features
11. On Generative Phonology

III. Genotype Grammar

1. Two Levels of Grammar: Genotype Grammar and Phenotype Grammar
2. The Basic Notions of Genotype Grammar
3. Constituency
4. Dependency
5. Constituency and Dependency as Complementary Notions
6. The Structure of the Sentence
6.1 The Notion of Syntaxeme
6.2 Predicate Frames
6.3 Functional Transposition and Superposition
7. Valence and Voice
8. The Typology of Sentence Constructions
9. The Paradox of Ergativity and Functional Superposition
10. Some Implications of the Integrated Theory of Ergativity for Linguistic Typology
10.1 Ergativity as a Grammatical Category
10.2 Accessibility to Relative Clause Formation
10.3 Voices in Ergative Languages
10.4 Split Ergative Languages
10.5 The Class of Ergative Languages
10.6 The Practical Results Anticipated
11. An Informal Theory of Passivization
11.1 The Basic Structure of Passive
11.2 Impersonal Passive Constructions
11.3 Passive and Antipassive
12. Alternative Theories of Passivization
12.1 Generative-Transformational Grammar
12.2 Relational Grammar
12.3 The Demotion Theory of Passivization
13. The Formalism of Applicative Grammar
13.1 The Formal System of Applicative Grammar
13.2 Relational Grammar
12.3 The Demotion Theory of Passivation
13. The Formalism of Applicative Grammar
13.1. The Formal System of Applicative Grammar
13.2. Superposition of Types
13.3. Combinators in Applicative Grammar
13.4 Assignment of Types to Combinators
13.5 Construction Rules, Replacement Rules, and Structure-Changing Rules
13.6 Deductive Processes: Reduction and Expansion
13.7 Sample Formalization: A Formal Theory of Passive and Antipassive
13.7.1 Short and Long Passive Constructions
13.7.2 Formal Reduction from the Long Passive Construction
13.7.3 Impersonal Passive Constructions
13.7.4 Impersonal Passive Constructions with Transitive Predicates
13.7.5 Passivization of the Tertiary Term
13.7.6 Passive and Antipassive Predicates and Constructions
13.8 Sample Formalization: Reflexive Constructions
13.9 Sample Formalization: Causative Constructions
13.10 Sample Formalization: Sentence Nests
14. A Comparison of Applicative Grammar and Montague Grammar
15. A Comparison of Applicative Grammar and Generative-Transformational Grammar
16. A Comparison of Applicative Grammar and Relational Grammar
17. A Comparison of Applicative Grammar and the Lexical-Functional Grammar of Bresnan
18. The Place of Applicative Grammar among Other Semiotic Systems

IV. Phenotype Grammar

1. The Task of Phenotype Grammar
2. The Word
3. The Structure of the Word and Morphological Formatives
4. Agglutination and Fusion
5. Syntagmatic Formatives
6. Concord and Government
7. Linguistic Categories
8. The Category of Case
a) The Active System
b) The Ergative System
c) The Accusative System

V. Linguistic Methodology

1. Empirical and Conceptual Problems in Linguistics
2. The Analytical-Deductive Method and Imaginary Experiments
3. The Special Role of Linguistic Anomalies
4. The Complementarity Principle and the Centaur Concepts
5. Static and Dynamic Meta-languages
6. The Role of Anologies in the Semiotic Theory of Language
7. The Use and Abuse of Mathematical Formalism
8. The Notion of Semiotic Reality

Notes
References
Subject Index
Language Index
Name Index

Indiana University Press

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