A Sense of Urgency

A Sense of Urgency

3.2 23
by John P. Kotter
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions


Most organizational change initiatives fail spectacularly (at worst) or deliver lukewarm results (at best). In his international bestseller Leading Change, John Kotter revealed why change is so hard, and provided an actionable, eight-step process for implementing successful transformations. The book became the change bible for managers worldwide.

Now, in A Sense

Overview


Most organizational change initiatives fail spectacularly (at worst) or deliver lukewarm results (at best). In his international bestseller Leading Change, John Kotter revealed why change is so hard, and provided an actionable, eight-step process for implementing successful transformations. The book became the change bible for managers worldwide.

Now, in A Sense of Urgency, Kotter shines the spotlight on the crucial first step in his framework: creating a sense of urgency by getting people to actually see and feel the need for change.

Why focus on urgency? Without it, any change effort is doomed. Kotter reveals the insidious nature of complacency in all its forms and guises.

In this exciting new book, Kotter explains:

· How to go beyond "the business case" for change to overcome the fear and anger that can suppress urgency

· Ways to ensure that your actions and behaviors -- not just your words -- communicate the need for change

· How to keep fanning the flames of urgency even after your transformation effort has scored some early successes

Written in Kotter's signature no-nonsense style, this concise and authoritative guide helps you set the stage for leading a successful transformation in your company.

Editorial Reviews

We're born to change, but we resist it at every turn. In most companies, organizational initiatives either implode or succeed only partially because of such resistance. In his bestselling Leading Change, John Kotter laid out a detailed, effective eight-step process for implementing corporate transformations. But how do such metamorphoses begin? In this stand-alone follow-up, Kotter explains how to create the sense of urgency that is indispensable for any real institutional progress. He describes how fear, anger, and ingrown complacency can stymie the best-laid reorganization plans. No-nonsense advice about finding the path and starting the engine to true change.
The Financial Times
But now a distinguished author says that what so many of us really lack is a sense of urgency. Is this guy for real? He is. John Kotter, emeritus professor at Harvard Business School, has a clear and simple message...This succinct book has a gentle, unhurried tone, but its message is insistent, relentless and urgent.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422179710
Publisher:
Harvard Business Review Press
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Pages:
208
Sales rank:
169,278
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Related Subjects

Videos

Meet the Author

John P. Kotter is the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership, Emeritus, at Harvard Business School, and is widely regarded as the world’s foremost authority on leadership and change. His has been the premier voice on how the best organizations actually do change.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

A Sense of Urgency 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kotter's book makes the argument that we're moving from a time of episodic change to continuous change in organisations. Episodic change is when things are stable and then you are thrown a big IT system and everything is chaotic for a few years, then it settles down again. Continuous change is when you keep getting these things thrown at you all the time. So, having a sense of urgency built into the organisation becomes more and more not just something to do with being part of a change process, but a more central organisational capability that might help you differentiate you from others. So, why does he think so much organisational change is doomed to failure? Because no change can get off to a good start unless you can take the false urgency - this kind of anxiety-driven, running around in circles, activity - or the complacency out of the system. That, and getting enough people who are absolutely determined deep in their hearts to get up every day and find the real problems and opportunities within the organisation and taking some action, even if it's teeny. Until you get enough people doing that you do not have a strong enough foundation to be able to launch an effort that has any chance of succeeding. More often than not, if people don't do that, any change is doomed from the beginning. He argues too that his book has a particular resonance during the current downturn, and we should always look at difficult situations not just as difficult situations but as an opportunity to launch some changes that will make you stronger in the future. Just firing a few people isn't going to make you stronger. Nobody has ever shrunk themselves to greatness. The most important piece of advice to take away from the book, he argues, is this: The world is dangerously full in an age of change with too much complacency and too much of this wretched, stressed-out, frenetic activity that we associate with false urgency. This is not producing outcomes that are good for the human community, and it will produce worse outcomes in the future. But we can do something about this. It is not an inevitably negative story if we recognise it and know the various methods for correcting it. All in all, another great book on business strategy from John Kotter. I read another leadership book this week after having come across it in a review for another one of Kotter's books. It's great and I also recommend it highly: Squawk!: How to Stop Making Noise and Start Getting Results
M_L_Gooch_SPHR More than 1 year ago
Back in the 70's I received a minor promotion on the job. My boss stated that the promotion was in large part due to my "sense of urgency". At the time, I really didn't fully understand what he meant but grew to love this attribute in others as the years and decades went by.

As a corporate human resources director, I find this trait is needed more today than ever in the past. Amid the continual chaos in our markets, Kotter has written a timely book that every manager should have on their desk or night stand. In his book, Kotter explains the hurdles that pop-up preventing a sense of urgency mindset. He speaks the truth when writing about making the "business case" and the limited value of such for most people. More importantly, he details how to remove these roadblocks. One of the most helpful sections speaks to the actions we must take to maintain the urgency after the initial sell.

I found this to be a very helpful book that I will be sharing with management. I hope you find this review helpful. Michael L. Gooch, Wingtips with Spurs: Cowboy Wisdom for Today's Business Leaders.
HarryHH More than 1 year ago
Just read this book this past weekend. It has inspired me to think and act differently regarding raising the sense of urgency on my team and within our organization.
JeffNC More than 1 year ago
All could gain from this book, each person, business, team, or church. Any individual or organization that wishes to see urgency in a different light.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Pete_the_ReaderNJ More than 1 year ago
But this is not the definitive work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
Complacent organizations simply cannot keep pace with today's accelerating rate of change. Resting on your laurels is no longer viable. Competitors, evolving markets and technological developments will swamp organizations that try to sit things out on the sidelines. Today, organizations must adopt the "fierce urgency of now" ethos that Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made famous in the 1960s. Business expert John P. Kotter explains why. His book tells leaders how to foster a "sense of urgency" among their employees. He contrasts "true urgency" with "false urgency" and discusses why negative pressure is counterproductive. getAbstract recommends his clear, enthusiastic book to executives who want to motivate employees, meet crucial goals and effect change in their organizations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
literatereviewer More than 1 year ago
The state of the new economic world is providing issues more pressing than those seen for over a generation. "A Sense of Urgency," explains and extrapolates on the construction and implementation of the first phase in creating continuing change. This book very clearly and distinctly describes both the need for instilling a sense of urgency in a company and in ourselves. It is clearly part one, in my opinion of a multi part series. It takes the first concept in "Leading Change," another Kotter work and explains it in tremendous detail. I recommend this book for those who have read "Leading Change."