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Sense of Wonder: A Century of Science Fiction
     

Sense of Wonder: A Century of Science Fiction

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by Leigh Ronald Grossman, Zenna Henderson, Richard Matheson, Robert A. Heinlein, Jack Vance
 

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A survey of the last 100 years of science fiction, with representative stories and illuminating essays by the top writers, poets, and scholars, from Edgar Rice Burroughs and Samuel Butler to Robert A. Heinlein and and Jack Vance, from E.E. "Doc" Smith and Clifford D. Simak to Ted Chiang and Charles Stross-- and everyone in between. More than one million words of

Overview

A survey of the last 100 years of science fiction, with representative stories and illuminating essays by the top writers, poets, and scholars, from Edgar Rice Burroughs and Samuel Butler to Robert A. Heinlein and and Jack Vance, from E.E. "Doc" Smith and Clifford D. Simak to Ted Chiang and Charles Stross-- and everyone in between. More than one million words of classic fiction and essays!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781434440358
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
12/20/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
152
Sales rank:
331,751
File size:
5 MB

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Sense of Wonder 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
John05 More than 1 year ago
This is by far the most comprehensive anthology of science fiction and essays on science fiction designed for college classes in science fiction. The ordering of the texts is a little odd, but the appendix offers a chronological guide to them. Some of the later selections are questionable--the editor tried to please living writers, which often means he agreed to anthologize a recent or an atypical work by a famous writer--a writer whose classic works were published in the 1980s might want more people to see her story from 2005, but that doesn't mean the anthologist should comply, especially since this anthology claims to be representative. The nineteenth century content is a bit slim, but it is alright. 1910 through 1980, this book is unparalleled in the breadth and quality of its texts. The essays are mostly good, but they sometimes overlap and often focus heavily on texts that are not represented in the anthology. A couple of the essays are too narrowly focused (the essay on the sf program at the University of Kansas is the best example of that). Still, there are enough essays that are properly focused for a college class of 15 weeks or less. You could read this anthology on your own as well, too, of course. A bonus--the anthology includes information about how to get your science fiction stories or novels published if you want to become a writer.