SENSORY INTEGRATION STRATEGIES

SENSORY INTEGRATION STRATEGIES

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by Lisa Berry
     
 
Sensory Integration Strategies
Interviewed by a Parent with G. Sagmiller
Sensory Strategies for Home and School
Why can't Johnny sit still? Why does Jane spit out her food? Why is Jack so rough? Why does John grind his teeth? Why does Jane Hit? It's called Sensory Integration or Sensory Processing. Although everyone processes sensory information, we

Overview

Sensory Integration Strategies
Interviewed by a Parent with G. Sagmiller
Sensory Strategies for Home and School
Why can't Johnny sit still? Why does Jane spit out her food? Why is Jack so rough? Why does John grind his teeth? Why does Jane Hit? It's called Sensory Integration or Sensory Processing. Although everyone processes sensory information, we interpret sensory information differently from one another.
Someone dragging their fingers across a chalkboard or certain food textures may bother one person, but not another. When the way a person interprets or processes information from their senses interferes with learning and daily routines, it is considered Sensory Integration Dysfunction (SID) or Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD). Independent studies show that Sensory Integration Dysfunction can be found in up to 70% of children who are considered learning disabled by schools, but most go undiagnosed.
Sensory integration therapy is essentially a form of occupational therapy, and it is generally offered by specially trained occupational therapists. It involves specific sensory activities (swinging, bouncing, brushing, and more) that are intended to help the patient regulate his or her sensory response. The outcome of these activities may be better focus, improved behavior, and even lowered anxiety.
If the child has Autism, Dyslexia, Down syndrome, Sensory Integration can be multiplied and getting treatment is a must!
If you're coping with autism, dyslexia or Down syndrome you've probably heard the terms sensory integration or sensory processing disorder. That's because many people have difficulty managing their sensory input. They may over- or under-react to visual, tactile, and aural input - sometimes to the point where they are unable to participate in typical life activities. Many people with autism are also hypersensitive or under-sensitive to light, noise, and touch. They may be unable to stand the sound of a dishwasher, or, on the other extreme, need to flap and even injure themselves to be fully aware of their bodies. Even people with Asperser Syndrome, who are capable in many settings, may be unable to go to movies, sit through concerts, or otherwise take part in social activities because the sound, lights or sensations are too overwhelming.
When this is the case, many practitioners will make a diagnosis of Sensory Processing Disorder, and will recommend Sensory Integration Therapy. Sensory Integration Therapy is generally provided by an Occupational Therapist. Many well-meaning occupational therapists have learned just a little about sensory integration therapy, and may be doing a poor job of implementing the approach. Information from well-trained occupational therapists is imperative.
You will learn about the following topics… what Sensory Integration is and how to spot it, when and how it can interfere with learning, what you can do at home and school to help the child, and general tips and activities that work to over come it (Sensory Integration Therapy).
This well developed program can help parents, educators and caregivers provide an enriched environment that will foster healthy growth and maturation. It was co-developed by an occupational therapist, Lisa Berry, OTR/L, and a parent, G Sagmiller, who has a child with special needs.

Editorial Reviews

Cayle Fuller
This ebook, like the DVD Sensory Integration Strategies, provides lots of information regarding the definition and use of sensory integration therapies. The book offers a written dialogue between parent/interviewer Mr. Sagmiller and a board certified occupational therapist in an organized and easy to follow format. I learned about very helpful tips and activities that can be used with ADHD children and other learning disabled children. Parents and Educators would benefit from reading this book!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940012648785
Publisher:
The Gifted Learning Project
Publication date:
04/07/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
787,670
File size:
17 KB

Meet the Author

Lisa graduated from Rockhurst University with a B.A. in psychology in 1995 and in 1997 with a master’s degree in occupational therapy. During her first two years of practice Lisa spent time in both Arizona and Pennsylvania as a traveling therapist working in a variety of facilities ranging from geriatrics to pediatrics. After returning to Kansas City in 1999, Lisa gained employment with the Gardner School district where she remained a staff pediatric therapist for 5 years. Simultaneously, Lisa worked for Infant-Toddler Services of Johnson County, serving children 0-3 and their families. Lisa is currently employed with Blue Valley School District in the Kansas City area as an early childhood occupational therapist.

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SENSORY INTEGRATION STRATEGIES 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This isn't a book. It's about the length of a short magazine article, transcribing an interview of an OT by a parent. It's a very general introduction to sensory processing disorder and a rundown of various strategies used to help. Not much actionable here, but perhaps an appropriate reference to share with friends or relatives to help explain what's up with your child because of its simplicity.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its really like a overall review of sensory integration difficulty and some ideas for home and classroom to help the child
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Learned alot about our child and how to help