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The Sentry (Elvis Cole and Joe Pike Series #14) [NOOK Book]

Overview

After Joe Pike saves a man's life, the man's family seems oddly resentful. Maybe because they're not who they seem to be-including the seductive Dru. But it's more than a charade-it's a trap. And Pike's already been hooked...


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The Sentry (Elvis Cole and Joe Pike Series #14)

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Overview

After Joe Pike saves a man's life, the man's family seems oddly resentful. Maybe because they're not who they seem to be-including the seductive Dru. But it's more than a charade-it's a trap. And Pike's already been hooked...


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  • Robert Crais - The Sentry
    Robert Crais - The Sentry  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Near the outset of Crais's impressive third thriller featuring L.A. PI Joe Pike (after The First Rule), Pike notices two suspicious characters enter a Venice, Calif., sandwich shop. Pike, an ex-Marine and former LAPD patrol officer, walks into the shop just in time to rescue its owner, Wilson Smith, from a vicious assault. Pike soon takes an interest in Smith's niece, Dru Rayne, whose "smart eyes" and warm smile lure him into a lethal gangland battle involving La Eme, the Mexican mafia, and a Bolivian drug connection. The LAPD and the FBI both try and fail to warn Pike off, but PI Elvis Cole, the lead in nine other Crais books, is as ever ready to support his pal. Heartbreaking ironies, frustrated desires, and violent nonstop action make this a standout. Crais just keeps getting better at giving depth to the laconic Pike and the anguished Cole, who still pines for his lost love, Louisiana attorney Lucy Chenier. Author tour. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Joe Pike has had his partner's back in 11 of Crais's 13 Elvis Cole novels. Yet in 2007's The Watchman and in 2010's The First Rule, Crais spotlighted Pike rather than Los Angeles PI Cole. Fans will celebrate as Pike is once again the alpha male. Stuff happens early on as the ex-marine, ex-cop, and ex-mercenary stamps out an armed robbery attempt. Pike's gallantry impresses Dru Rayne, and her lively eyes chip away at his hardened armor. During a second break-in, Dru is kidnapped, and Pike pushes hard to rescue her. This warrior bent on restoring order is cool in battle, but Crais avoids overloading his yarn with cinematic action. A creepy serial killer, Latino gangbangers, and nasty cops crank up the suspense. Lies and betrayal conceal the real bad guys, prompting Pike to enlist Elvis Cole's help. Crais's buddy system is alive and well. VERDICT Steve McQueen in The Magnificent Seven, Jack Reacher, and now Joe Pike: three cheers for testosterone! Stock up with multiple copies. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 8/10.]—Rollie Welch, Cleveland P.L.
Kirkus Reviews

Having taken on the Serbian mob (The First Rule,2010), soldier of fortune Joe Pike is ready for a slickly plotted encounter with drug-dealing Bolivians and their strongmen.

Stopping at a service station to top off one of his Jeep's tires, Pike spots two suspicious men entering a sandwich shop. Moments later, he follows and finds them beating and kicking the owner, Wilson Smith. Attacked by Pike, one assailant flees and the other is swiftly subdued and waiting for the police. But Smith doesn't want the police, and he doesn't want the medical care he obviously needs; all he wants is for everybody to leave him alone. When his niece Dru Rayne calls Pike the following morning to tell him that someone's returned to vandalize the shop, Pike realizes that keeping predators off Smith's back could amount to full-time work. Working his connections in L.A.'s Ghost Town, he arranges a meeting with up-and-coming gang lord Miguel Azzara, who assures him that Smith's attackers, Reuben Mendoza and Alberto Gomer, won't be back. So Pike relaxes enough to take warm, appealing Dru out for a beer and wonder whether she could become the special lady in his life. But the point becomes moot when another call tells him that Smith and his niece have vanished, and not simply because they left for Oregon until things cooled down, as Smith maintained in a phone call. Have they been kidnapped or killed? Why didn't Azzara protect them? Are the culprits Mendoza and Gomer, or other players in the shadowy game Pike's walked into? The high-profile involvement of Pike's ex-colleague Det. Jerry Button of the LAPD and Jack Straw of the FBI alerts Pike and his partner, Elvis Cole, that this case has always been about more than assault and battery. But they aren't prepared for a series of revelations that make every player's story suspect.

"War is what I do," Pike tells Azzara when they first square off. Roger that, and prepare the body bags.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101486092
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 1/11/2011
  • Series: Elvis Cole and Joe Pike Series , #14
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 13,491
  • File size: 440 KB

Meet the Author

Robert Crais
Robert Crais is the 2006 recipient of the Ross Macdonald Literary Award. He is the author of many New York Times bestsellers, most recently The First Rule. He lives in Los Angeles.

Biography

Los Angeles is known as the city of dreams, largely because so many Americans dream of breaking into the Hollywood film and television industry. In 1976, Robert Crais went west from Louisiana to pursue that very dream. As it turned out, he became one of the lucky few to break into the industry in a big way. Crais has since written for such hugely popular TV shows as Quincy, Cagney and Lacey, Miami Vice, Hill Street Blues, and L.A. Law, just to name a few. However, after achieving such success (which included a prestigious Emmy nomination) in a business that so many would give everything to break into, Robert Crais decided to step away and pursue his true dream. Frustrated by the collaborative process that comes with screenwriting, and inspired by pulp-pioneers such as Raymond Chandler, Crais became a mystery novelist. With his massively popular Elvis Cole/Joe Pike mysteries series, it seems as though success has a funny way of following Crais no matter what he decides to do.

Crais published his very first novel in 1987. The Monkey's Raincoat introduced mystery fans to Elvis Cole and Joe Pike, a pair of L.A. private investigators who would become his most-beloved recurring characters. Crais's transition from screenwriting to novel-writing was an astoundingly smooth one. The Monkey's Raincoat earned him nominations for the Edgar, Anthony, Shamus, and Macavity awards, winning both the Anthony and Macavity for "Best Novel of the Year." Crais's publisher was so overjoyed by the novel's success that he encouraged Crais to keep the Cole/Pike team going. "I started writing these books to get away from writing other people's concepts, like TV and movies," Crais told Barnes&Noble.com. "I never expected to write these guys as a series...but the book proved to be so popular and the characters were so popular that my publisher wanted more." What followed was a series of bestselling mysteries, including Stalking the Angel (1989), Free Fall (1993), L.A. Requiem (1999), and last year's The Forgotten Man.

Although the series was not part of Crais's original plan, he still seems to hold the Cole and Pike team closer to his heart than anything he has previously written. He explained, "The characters have deepened, and I think they kind of reflect what's going on with me and the world as I see it." When asked about whether or not we can expect to see the crime-solving buddies on the big screen anytime soon, he said, "I think I would have a difficult time in the collaborative process when other people suddenly put their fingerprints on Elvis and Joe," further illustrating his personal feelings for his P.I. team.

As much as Crais loves his series, he does occasionally write novels outside of the Cole/Pike world. His latest, The Two-Minute Rule, tells the story of career criminal Max Holman, a recently released-from-prison bank robber who finds himself hunting an entirely different kind of criminal after his son is gunned down. The book has since raked in positive reviews from such publications as Booklist, Publisher's Weekly, and The Library Journal. While The Two-Minute Rule does not feature Cole and Pike, Crais fans will notice one significant similarity between his latest novel and his famous series -- the Los Angeles setting. "I can't think of a better place to set crime novels because of what Los Angeles is. Los Angeles is the main where the nation goes to make its dreams come true. When you have a place like that where so many people are risking their very identities, not just money and cash, but they're risking who they are because it's their hopes and dreams, when you have that kind of tension and that kind of friction, you can't help but have crime."

Fortunately, Crais will never have to succumb to such friction and tension since, for a success story such as he, Los Angeles completely lived up to its promise of being the city of dreams.

Good To Know

Some fun and fascinating outtakes from our interview with Crais:

"My first job was cleaning dog kennels. It was especially, ah, aromatic during those hot, humid Louisiana summers, but it prepared me for Hollywood."

"My fiction is almost always inspired by a character's need or desire to rise above him-or herself. No one is perfect and some of us have much adversity in our lives; it is those people who struggle to rise above their nature or background that I find the most interesting and heroic."

"Fun details? Like Elvis Cole, I have a dry sense of humor. Sometimes I am so dry that people don't know I'm kidding and think I'm being serious. I enjoy this because their reactions are often funny. Also, I wear beautifully colored shirts like Elvis Cole, only I was wearing them before him. People will say, ‘Look, RC dresses just like Elvis Cole,' and I'll say, 'No, Elvis Cole dresses like me!' I also wear sunglasses like Joe Pike, but not indoors and not at night."

"Elvis Cole wrote two episodes of television. No lie. It happened like this: I had written episodes of Miami Vice and Jag that were rewritten by person or persons unknown -- changed so badly that I didn't want my name on them, so I used Elvis Cole's name as a pen name."

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    1. Hometown:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 20, 1953
    2. Place of Birth:
      Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    1. Education:
      B.S., Louisiana State University, 1976; Clarion Writers Workshop at Michigan State University
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

New Orleans
2005

Monday, 4:28 a.m., the narrow French Quarter room was smoky with cheap candles that smelled of honey. Daniel stared through broken shutters and shivering glass up the length of the alley, catching a thin slice of Jackson Square through curtains of gale-force rain that swirled through New Orleans like mad bats riding the storm. Daniel had never seen rain fall up before.

Daniel loved these damned hurricanes. He folded back the shutters, then opened the window. Rain hit him good. It tasted of salt and smelled of dead fish and weeds. The cat-five wind clawed through New Orleans at better than a hundred miles an hour, but back here in the alley—in a cheap one-room apartment over a po'boy shop—the wind was no stronger than an arrogant breeze.

The power in this part of the Quarter had gone out almost an hour ago; hence, the candles Daniel found in the manager's office. Emergency lighting fed by battery packs lit a few nearby buildings, giving a creepy blue glow to the shimmering walls. Most everyone in the surrounding buildings had gone. Not everyone, but most. The stubborn, the helpless, and the stupid had stayed.

Like Daniel's friend, Tolley.

Tolley had stayed.

Stupid.

And now here they were in an empty building surrounded by empty buildings in an outrageous storm that had forced more than a million people out of the city, but Daniel kinda dug it. All this noise and all this emptiness, no one to hear Tolley scream.

Daniel turned from the window, arching his eyebrows.

"You smell that? That's what zombies smell like, brought up from the death with an unnatural life. You get to see a zombie?"

Tolley was between answers right now, being tied to the bed with thirty feet of nylon cord. His head just kinda hung there, all swollen and broken, though he was still breathing. Every once in a while he would lurch and shiver. Daniel didn't let Tolley's lack of responsiveness stop him.

Daniel sauntered over to the bed. Cleo and Tobey shuffled out of the way, letting him pass.

Daniel had a syringe pack in his bag, along with some poppers, meth, and other choice pharmaceuticals. He took out the kit, shot up Tolley with some crystal, then waited for it to take effect. Outside, something exploded with a muffled whump that wasn't quite lost in the wind. Power transformer, probably, giving up the ghost, or maybe a wall falling over.

Tolley's eyes flickered amid a sudden fury of blinks, then dialed into focus. He tried to pull away when he saw Daniel, but, really, where could he go?

Daniel said, all serious, "I asked you, you seen a zombie? They got'm here in this place, I know for a fact."

Tolley shook his head, which kinda pissed Daniel off. On his way to New Orleans six days earlier, having been sent to find Tolley based upon an absolutely spot-on lead, Daniel decided this was his one pure and good chance to see a zombie. Daniel could not abide a zombie, and found their existence offensive. The dead should stay dead, and not rise to walk again, all shamblin' and vile and slack. He didn't care for vampires, either, but zombies just rubbed him the wrong way. Daniel had it on good authority that New Orleans held quite a few zombies, and maybe a vampire or two.

"Don't be like that, Tolliver. New Orleans is supposed to have zombies, don't it, what with all this hoodoo and shit you got here, them zombies from Haiti? You musta seen something

Tolley's eyes were bright with meth, the one eye, the left, a glossy red ball what with the burst veins.

Daniel wiped the rain from his face, and felt all tired.

"Where is she?"

"I swear I doan know."

"You kill her? That what you been tryin' to say?"

"No!"

"She tell you where they goin'?"

"I don't know nuthin' about—"

Daniel hammered his fist straight down on Tolley's chest, and scooped up the Asp. The Asp was a collapsible steel rod almost two feet long. Daniel brought it down hard, lashing Tolley's chest, belly, thighs, and shins with a furious beating. Tolley screamed and jerked at his binds, but no one was left to hear. Daniel let him have it for a long time, then tossed aside the Asp and returned to the window. Tobey and Cleo scrambled out of his way.

"I wanna see a goddamned zombie. A zombie, vampire, something to make this fuckin' trip worthwhile."

The rain blew in hard, hot and salty as blood. Daniel didn't care. Here he was, come all this way, and not a zombie to be found. Anything was good, Daniel missed out. A life of miserable disappointments.

He looked at Tobey and Cleo. They were difficult to see in the flickery light, all blurry and smudged, but he could make them out well enough.

"Bet I could kill me a zombie, one on one, straight up, and I'd like to try. You think I could kill me a zombie?"

Neither Tobey nor Cleo answered.

"I ain't shittin', I could take me a zombie. Take me a vampire, too, only here we are and I gotta waste my time with this lame shit. I'd rather be huntin' zombies."

He pointed at Tolley.

"Hey, boy."

Daniel returned to the bed and shook Tolley awake.

"You think I could take me a zombie, head up, one on one?"

The red eye rolled, and blood leaked from the shattered mouth. A mushy hiss escaped, so Daniel leaned closer. Sounded like the fucker was finally openin' up.

"Say what?"

Tolley's mouth worked as he tried to speak.

Daniel smiled encouragingly.

"You hear that wind? I was a bat, I'd spread my wings and ride that sumbitch for all she was worth. Where'd they go, boy? I know she tol' ya. You tell me where they went so I can get outta here. Just say it. You're almost there. Give me a hand, and I'm out your hair."

Tolley's lips worked, and Daniel knew he was about to give it, but then what little air he had left hissed out.

"You say west? They was headed west? Over to Texas?"

Tolley was dead.

Daniel stared at the body for a moment, then drew his gun and put five bullets into Tolliver James's chest. Nasty explosions that anyone staying behind would have heard even with the lion wind. Daniel didn't give a damn. If someone came running, Daniel figured to shoot them, too, but nobody came—no police, no neighbors, no nobody. Everyone with two squirts of brain juice was hunkered down tight, trying to survive.

Daniel reloaded, tucked away his gun, then took out the satellite phone. The cell stations were out all over the city, but the sat phone worked great. He checked the time, hit the speed dial, then waited for a link. It always took a few seconds.

In that time, he stood taller, straightened himself, and resumed his normal manner.

When the connection was made, Daniel reported.

"Tolliver James is dead. He didn't provide anything useful."

Daniel listened for a moment before responding.

"No, sir, they're gone. That much is confirmed. James was a good bet, but I don't believe she told him anything."

He listened again, this time for quite a while.

"No, sir, that is not altogether true. There are three or four people here I'd still like to talk to, but the storm has turned this place to shit. They've almost certainly evacuated. I just don't know. It will take me a while to locate them."

More chatter from the other side, but then they were finished.

"Yes, sir, I understand. You get yours, I get mine. I won't let you down."

A last word from the master.

"Yes, sir. Thank you. I'll keep you informed."

Daniel shut the phone and put it away.

"Asshole."

He returned to the window, and let the rain lash him. Everything was wet now: shirt, pants, shoes, hair, all the way down to his bones. He leaned out, better to see the Square. A fifty-five-gallon oil drum tumbled past the alley's mouth, end over end, followed by a bicycle, swept along on its side, and then a shattered sheet of plywood flipping and soaring like a playing card tossed out like trash.

Daniel shouted into the wind as loud as he could.

"C'mon and get me, you fuckin' zombies! Show your true and unnatural colors."

Daniel threw back his head and howled. He barked like a dog, then howled again before turning back to the room to pack up his gear. Tobey and Cleo were gone.

Tolliver had hidden eight thousand dollars under the mattress, still vacu-packed in plastic, which Daniel found when he first searched the room. Probably a gift from the girl. Daniel stashed the money in his bag, checked to make sure Tolliver had no pulse, then went to the little bathroom where he'd left Tolliver's lady friend after he strangled her, nice and neat in the tub. A little black stream of ants had already found her, not even a day.

Cleo said, "Gotta get going, Daniel. Stop fuckin' around."

Tobey said, "Go where, a storm like this? Makes sense to stay."

Daniel decided Tobey was right. Tobey was the smart one, and usually right, even if Daniel couldn't always see him.

"Okay, I guess I should wait till the worst is over."

Tobey said, "Wait."

Cleo said, "Wait, wait."

Like echoes fading away.

Daniel returned to the window. He leaned out into the rain again, watching the mouth of the alley in case a zombie rattled past.

"C'mon, goddamnit, lemme see one. One freaky-ass zombie is all I ask."

If a zombie appeared, Daniel planned to jump out the window after it and rip its putrid, unnatural flesh to pieces with his teeth. He was, after all, a werewolf, which was why he was such a good hunter and killer. Werewolves feared nothing.

Daniel tipped back his head and howled to match the wind, then doused the candles and sat with the bodies, waiting for the storm to pass.

When it ended, Daniel would find their trail, and track them, and he would not quit until they were his. No matter how long it took or how far they ran. This was why the men down south used him for these jobs and paid him so well.

Werewolves caught their prey.

Los Angeles
Now

The wind did not wake him. It was the dream. He heard the buffeting wind before he opened his eyes, but the dream was what woke him on that dark early morning. A cat was his witness. Hunkered at the end of the bed, ears down, a low growl in its chest, a ragged black cat was staring at him when Elvis Cole opened his eyes. Its warrior face was angry, and, in that moment, Cole knew they had shared the nightmare.

Cole woke on the bed in his loft bathed in soft moonlight, feeling his A-frame shudder as the wind tried to push it from its perch high in the Hollywood Hills. A freak weather system in the Midwest was pulling fifty- to seventy-knot winds from the sea that had hammered Los Angeles for days.

Cole sat up, awake now and wanting to shake off the dream—an ugly nightmare that left him feeling unsettled and depressed. The cat's ears stayed down. Cole held out his hand, but the cat poured off the bed like a pool of black ink.

Cole said, "Me, too."

He checked the time. Habit. Three-twelve in the a.m. He reached toward the nightstand to check his gun—habit—but stopped himself when he realized what he was doing.

"C'mon, what's the point?"

The gun was there because it was always there, sometimes needed but most times not. Living alone with only an angry cat for company, there seemed no reason to move it. Now, at three-twelve in the middle of a wind-torched night, it was a reminder of what he had lost.

Cole realized he was trembling, and pushed out of bed. The dream scared him. Muzzle flash so bright it sparkled his eyes; the charcoal smell of smokeless powder; a glittery red mist that dappled his skin; shattered sunglasses that arced through the air—images so vivid they shocked him awake.

Now he shook as his body burned off the fear.

The back of Cole's house was an A-shaped glass steeple, giving him a view of the canyon behind his house and a diamond-dust glimpse of the city beyond. Now, the canyon was blue with bright moonlight. The sleeping houses below were surrounded by blue-and-gray trees that shivered and danced in the St. Vitus wind. Cole wondered if someone down there had awakened like him. He wondered if they had suffered a similar nightmare—seeing their best friend shot to death in the dark.

Violence was part of him.

Elvis Cole did not want it, seek it, or enjoy it, but maybe these were only things he told himself in cold moments like now. The nature of his life had cost him the woman he loved and the little boy he had grown to love, and left him alone in this house with nothing but an angry cat for company and a pistol that did not need to be put away.

Now here was this dream that left his skin crawling—so real it felt like a premonition. He looked at the phone and told himself no—no, that's silly, it's stupid, it's three in the morning.

Cole made the call.

One ring, and his call was answered. At three in the morning.

"Pike."

"Hey, man."

Cole didn't know what to say after that, feeling so stupid.

"You good?"

Pike said, "Good. You?"

"Yeah. Sorry, man, it's late."

"You okay?"

"Yeah. Just a bad feeling is all."

They lapsed into a silence Cole found embarrassing, but it was Pike who spoke first.

"You need me, I'm there."

"It's the wind. This wind is crazy."

"Uh-huh."

"Watch yourself."

He told Pike he would call again soon, then put down the phone.

Cole felt no relief after the call. He told himself he should, but he didn't. The dream should have faded, but it did not. Talking to Pike now made it feel even more real.

You need me, I'm there.

How many times had Joe Pike placed himself in harm's way to save him?

They had fought the good fight together, and won, and sometimes lost. They had shot people who had harmed or were doing harm, and been shot, and Joe Pike had saved Cole's life more than a few times like an archangel from Heaven.

Yet here was the dream and the dream did not fade—

Muzzle flashes in a dingy room. A woman's shadow cast on the wall. Dark glasses spinning into space. Joe Pike falling through a terrible red mist.

Cole crept downstairs through the dark house and stepped out onto his deck. Leaves and debris stung his face like sand on a windswept beach. Lights from the houses below glittered like fallen stars.

In low moments on nights like this when Elvis Cole thought of the woman and the boy, he told himself the violence in his life had cost him everything, but he knew that was not true. As lonely as he sometimes felt, he still had more to lose.

He could lose his best friend.

Or himself.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 297 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(122)

4 Star

(85)

3 Star

(51)

2 Star

(23)

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(16)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 297 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Thriller with some heart

    I received this book from an early reader program and wow, what a ride! The Sentry is an exciting page-turner that will keep you up late into the night. Joe Pike is an action hero with some real depth. When Pike observes a shopkeeper being beaten, he steps in to save the day. This good samaritan act draws him into to a mystery involving killers, gangsters, drug cartels, and people on the run. The more he learns, the more the mystery deepens. Pike charges through with a moral compass that stays pointed true north, regardless of the personal consequences. The action starts fast, stays fast, and has an ending that is both satisfying and poignant. This book is more than just a mindless thriller. The characters are well-developed, the writing is crisp and there is an emotional payoff for the time you invest in the story. This was my first introduction to Robert Crais and the character of Joe Pike. Both have won a new fan. Clear your schedule when you pick up this book, because you won't want to put it down. Highly recommended.

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I love this series

    Robert Crais is firmly planted on my list of favourite authors. He has written some great stand alone novels, but it is the recurring characters of Elvis Cole (self proclaimed World's Greatest Detective) and his partner Joe Pike that I can't get enough of.

    "Cole was a licensed private investigator Pike met back in the day when Pike still worked the badge. Not the likeliest of pairings, Pike being so quiet and remote, Cole being one of those people who thought he was funny, but they were more alike then most people knew."

    The Sentry opens with a prologue featuring a truly creepy killer in New Orleans in 2005. Fast forward to present day in L.A. Joe Pike is just filling up his jeep with gas and the tires with air when he notices two gang bangers heading into a small sandwich shop. Instinct sends him across the street in time to stop the beating the two are giving the shopkeeper. But that simple good Samaritan acts leads to a whole lot more...gang wars, drug cartels, a deranged assasin and....a woman. Who has her own secrets...

    "If Pike had not stopped for air, he would not have seen the men or crossed the street. He would not have met the woman he was about to meet. Nothing that was about to happen would have happened. But Pike had stopped. And now the worst was coming."

    Oh, how's that for great foreshadowing! And the plot Crais has crafted absolutely delivers. Page turning, riveting, non stop action. But those of us who have come to love these characters have been waiting for Crais to reveal a little more of the enigma that is Joe Pike. In The Sentry, we get a glimpse behind Pike's ever present sunglasses into what makes him tick. The relationship with Elvis is explored in more depth as well.

    What is the appeal of Joe Pike? Well, he's fearless with a strong moral compass that he can't help but follow. It doesn't hurt that he's strong, attractive and sexy. But he's everything you wouldn't expect as well - he's a vegetarian who practices yoga. Just a great character that I can't get enough of.

    The Sentry kept me turning pages non stop. Robert Crais is one of the best thriller/crime writers out there. Fans of the Jack Reacher books would enjoy this series.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2011

    great read

    I LOVE joe pike. he has such a deep sense of honor, and will do anything to protect those he loves. if I were to ever need rescuing I would want joe. if you really want to get to know him you should start with what I consider to be the first joe pike novel, L.A. Requiem. you learn so much about his background, and how he came to be joe. it's my very favorite book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The Sentry

    The Sentry is the latest novel in Robert Crais' Joe Pike series. In this one Pike is a Good Samaritan and steps in when a local sandwich shop owner is attacked by two gang members. Pike has a thing for Dru, the niece of the shop owner and offers to help then, but then she and her uncle go missing. Before you know it, the LAPD, FBI and the Mexican Mafia are involved. Pike recruits his friend Elvis Cole and soon bodies start emerging; none of which are Dru or her uncle. I enjoyed the story, the writing and the characters. Another good book by Robert Crais.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 3, 2011

    Joe Pike ~strong, silent hero!

    I so enjoy reading about Joe Pike! And this one is the best so far. Can't wait for this one to come out in paperback. He doesn't say much but his actions are expansive!
    What a storyteller this Robert Crais. Give us more Joe Pike!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2011

    Good Read

    I love Robert Crais and Joe Pike is my favorite character. Having said that, I did not feel that Joe Pike stayed true to the character we have come to know throughout the years. It was hard to understand why he continued to fixate on this woman as we became more and more aware of her lies and deception. As a reader I did not invest in the Dru and Wilson's character so could not understand Joe's obsession. As always I truly enjoyed the engaging writing style of Robert Crais and look forward to the next Joe Pike and Elvis Cole book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 1, 2011

    A Bit Disappointing

    I love Robert Crais and eagerly awaited this novel. Unfortunately, I was disappointed. The book was good, but I felt it wasn't as good as his past efforts. I didn't really feel a connection with the Dru Raines character, and the antagonist was just farfetched and bizzare. Not a bad read, but not a compelling, page-turner like his past Pike/Cole novels.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2011

    Gelati's Scoop

    Am I a sucker for a Joe Pike novel or what? Yes I am and like many of you I marked the release date on my calendar and waited patiently to get my hands on it. I buzzed through it and, well, let me just hold off on my thoughts for a little bit. Let's get to what is inside the covers first:
    "Dru Rayne and her uncle fled to L.A. after Hurricane Katrina; but now, five years later, they face a different danger. When Joe Pike witnesses Dru's uncle beaten by a protection gang, he offers his help, but neither of them want it-and neither do the federal agents mysteriously watching them.
    As the level of violence escalates, and Pike himself becomes a target, he and Elvis Cole learn that Dru and her uncle are not who they seem- and that everything he thought he knew about them has been a lie. A vengeful and murderous force from their past is now catching up to them . . . and only Pike and Cole stand in the way."
    Nothing but our buddy Jared getting his daily moo is what it seems in The Sentry. Personally I enjoyed the interludes with Jared and hope that he makes appearances in future Pike vehicles. The reason I enjoy Robert Crais' work so much is not the twists and turns this novel takes and it is not so much Joe Pike (but I do like him very much), it is the ability, skill and consistency that comes with each read. I know that I am getting a very rich, well- constructed plotline, characters that I can identify with on some level and either root for them or grow to dislike them. I develop a feeling that I am right there in whatever environment Crais wants to place me in, basically your textbook, by the numbers, well- conceived and executed novel. In this day and age of receiving value, this author is bank, all the way. There are far too few of them in my estimation anymore, Robert Crais just doesn't take a novel off or mail it in.
    What are you reading today? Check us out and become our friend on Shelfari, Linkedin &Twitter. Go to Goodreads and become our friend there and suggest books for us to read and post on. Did you know you can shop directly on Amazon by clicking the Amazon Banner on our blog? Thanks for stopping by today; We will see you tomorrow. Have a great day.Look for us at Gelati's Scoop!!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2012

    Horrid.

    Mr. Crais seems to have run out of motivation. This book was written on autopilot.

    Plot? I guess there is one..but it really makes no sense.

    Fleshed out characters? Nope.

    Motivation for actions? None.

    This is quite possibly Robert's worst work.

    The one positive I guess is that it's an easy, quick read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 4, 2011

    Crais does it again!

    What a consistent great writer of crime thrillers! Joe Pike is one of the best characters ever. He's back in another great book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 15, 2011

    Love Joe Pike

    Keep 'em coming Robert. Another great JP thriller!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 23, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Two thumbs way up

    I started reading the first book and became addicted to this. Great read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Joe Pike still untouchable

    Crais once again delivers a powerful Joe Pike experience, with non-stop action and thrills. Full of twists and turns this novel will not disappoint, and it leaves you ready for Joe's next adventure and more of Elvis' one-liners.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 9, 2011

    I love Robert Crais and this is another awesome book!

    Joe Pike is the coolest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A little rough

    Reviews Of Unusual Size - Re: After stopping an attempted robbery, Crais' nearly silent do-gooder Joe Pike finds himself oddly fascinated by a beautiful young lady. A lady that has more hidden in her past than the typical niece of a fish-shoppe owner. (They're well known to be dull) Soon, Pike and Elvis Cole, the world's greatest detective will be up to their necks in mystery, peeping Toms and danger.   Outstanding: Crais is an excellent writer of thrillers. I would assume it's even on his business card. And with good reason. He keeps the story rollicking along and the characters consistently engaging.   Unacceptable: The only real niggles would spoil a few plots if mentioned, but there's a few things that seemed wonk, but nothing significant.   Summary: Not my favorite of Crais' novels, i prefer more Cole in my stocking, but still really, really enjoyable. It was nice to hear from Lucy, Cole's lovely N'Awlins lady friend too.   4/5   Notes: Crais has turned down multiple offers to make movies of Cole and Pike. He prefers them to exist in the heads of his readers.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 13, 2014

    Joe Pike's the man!  He's quiet and dangerous and doesn't go out

    Joe Pike's the man!  He's quiet and dangerous and doesn't go out looking for relationships.  But when he meets and falls for an interesting woman, he doesn't let go.  After saving Dru Rayne and her uncle from gangbangers, Pike makes a date with her and promises to look out for them and their little shop.  When they disappear, the action moves into high gear.  The police, gangs, the FBI and Joe Pike all race to find Dru and her uncle, all working against each other.  This story is one of Robert Crais' best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    A dj girl walks in

    Uh you dont allready have dj pon3 aka vinyl scratch?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2013

    Flash Burst to Celestia

    I want to run for princess in both.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    Celestia

    Okay. Please list your regisetion here. Write like this: My Fall formal dance princess should be ____name_____________ because she is___exmaple:( Funny,dorky and friend)___ so i like to vote for her. I list ballet in private. Please vote resul thirty three. Thank you. Sincre.if you want to run to be fall princess. We need your name here. And we will annouce who won. Twilxe, and others please put you name res thirty or thirty two. thank you. Votes will remain until otcber twenty first.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2013

    New Equestria Girls rp!

    Welome to Canterlot High! Meet Twilight Sparkle, the principal's assitant, as she takes you on a persnoal tour of the gounds. <br>
    Result two is the girls' bio area, and result three is the boys' bio area. Don't forget to include your age, description, relationship status, and your group. Groups are: Rockers(like Flah Sentry and Sunset Shimmer), Atheletes (like Rainbow Dash), Techies, Eco-kids(like Fluttershy), Comedians(like Pinkie Pie), New-Bes (like Twilight, Loners (like Applejack ad the CMC), and Fashionistas( like Rarity). Staff bios are located at result four. For your convienice, if you are a pony crossing over to the human world, include your human name. For example, my friend FlutterShy is Faith Summers. <br>
    Result five is the cafeteria, the main roleplay. Six is the field and track. Atheletes often hang out there. Seven is Classroom #1, which usually hosts math class. Classroom #2, home to language arts, is at result 8. The auditorium is result 9, and Rockers will usually practice songs here. The library- result 10, mosty for techies.<br>
    Result 11 is where you claim your house. Results 12-27 are availible house space. <br>
    And finally, when you're feeling a bit down, chill out at the Cakes' bakery, located at result 28. If ever a vote is to be cast, for the Fall Formal, Spring Fling, or other event, go to result 33 and cast your vote. <br>
    This is Twilight Sparkle, signing out for now! <br>
    <p>
    You may rp: <br>
    OCs <br>
    Named Canon Characters <br>
    Unnamed Canon Chracters (do research before coming up with a name. The two rocker girls are named, as is Tennis Match, an Athelete) <br>
    Pony Counterparts that do not appear in the movie. (Lyra, Soarin, Braeburn, Lightning Dust, for example) <br>
    S
    The end!

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