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Separating Together: How Divorce Transforms Families
     

Separating Together: How Divorce Transforms Families

by Abigail J. Stewart, Anne P. Copeland, Nia Lane Chester, Janet E. Malley, Nicole B. Barenbaum
 

Is divorce a catastrophe for children? Do single parents have trouble establishing authority in their homes? Do boys have a harder time adjusting than girls? Based on a unique longitudinal study of 100 divorcing families with school-age children, this book argues that popular images of divorce including those shared by many psychologists are too individualistic,

Overview

Is divorce a catastrophe for children? Do single parents have trouble establishing authority in their homes? Do boys have a harder time adjusting than girls? Based on a unique longitudinal study of 100 divorcing families with school-age children, this book argues that popular images of divorce including those shared by many psychologists are too individualistic, too negative, and too universalizing about an experience that can be very different for men and women, parents and children, and different kinds of families. The book integrates qualitative and quantitative data to illuminate both the positive and negative effects of divorce on family members and family relationships, offering a nuanced, empirically grounded examination of divorce as a family system event.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"In this book Abigail Stewart and her colleagues report on their magnificent study of how divorce transforms families. The longitudinal study—funded by NIMH and conducted as a true collaboration—is simply the best study in the United States on the issue of divorce. Its provocative findings will surely change how we think about divorce and its aftermath. In this landmark book is an enormous amount of information—and great wisdom—that should benefit anyone who studies divorce and everyone who has been touched by divorce." —Faye Crosby, PhD, Professor of Psychology, Smith College

"Imagine—a book about the psychological effects of divorce without a political ax to grind! Sagely treating divorce as a complex process rather than a cataclysmic event or a sin, this book judiciously charts the challenges and pitfalls divorcing parents and their children confront, as well as the growth many achieve in the process. This sober, wise, and humane book is less interested in moralistic hand-wringing than in fostering better outcomes for the millions of lives divorce transforms. The perfect antidote to the doomsday discourse on divorce." —Judith Stacey, author, In the Name of the Family: Rethinking Family Values in the Postmodern Age.

Booknews
Based on a unique longitudinal study of 1,000 divorcing families with school-age children, argues that popular images of divorce are too negative and too universalizing about an experience that can be very different for men and women, parents and children, and different kinds of families. The authors illuminate both the positive and negative effects of divorce on family members and relationships during the first year after parental separation. Their conceptualization of divorce incorporates the potential for personal growth, focuses on the family as a whole, and recognizes both the influences of and upon gender roles in the family. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781572302358
Publisher:
Guilford Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/1997
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
293
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Meet the Author

Abigail J. Stewart, PhD, is Professor of Psychology and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan, where she is also Director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Widely published, her research has focused on the psychology of women's lives; personality; and adaptation to change.

Anne P. Copeland, PhD, is Associate Professor of Psychology at Boston University. She is currently studying how family process and national culture affect adolescents' identity and adjustment.

Nia Lane Chester, PhD, is Professor of Psychology and Dean for Learning and Assessment at Pine Manor College in Brookline, MA. A former Radcliffe Research Scholar and recipient of a DuPont grant from the Women's College Coalition, her interests include role and personality interaction, stress and coping patterns in adults and children, and women and work.

Janet E. Malley, PhD, is Senior Research Associate at the Murray Research Center of Radcliffe College. Her research interests are in the area of adult development, focusing in particular on how the process of development may be mediated by work and family roles.

Nicole B. Barenbaum, PhD, is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Her research focuses on the history of personality psychology in the U.S.

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