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Sermons: Biblical Wisdom for Daily Living

Overview

Sermons: Biblical Wisdom for Daily Living is a collection of forty timeless addresses he has preached in The Memorial Church, Harvard University. In Part One, Seasons, Gomes begins with Advent expectations, showing us how at Christmas we can usefully channel our feelings of depression, impatience, and joy; how at Easter - the time of the Resurrection - we can confront our fears of the fear of death and give life a chance, arguing that we don't have to die to live; and how Trinity is a time to see the big picture:...
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Overview

Sermons: Biblical Wisdom for Daily Living is a collection of forty timeless addresses he has preached in The Memorial Church, Harvard University. In Part One, Seasons, Gomes begins with Advent expectations, showing us how at Christmas we can usefully channel our feelings of depression, impatience, and joy; how at Easter - the time of the Resurrection - we can confront our fears of the fear of death and give life a chance, arguing that we don't have to die to live; and how Trinity is a time to see the big picture: the wholeness and unity of God. In Part Two, Themes, Gomes focuses on what the scriptures have to say about a range of issues and sensibilities. He speaks of friendship, relationships, and our desire for happiness; suggests that frustration and anxiety can be means for the discovery of spiritual wholeness; and covers such themes as hospitality, patriotism, stewardship, and thanksgiving. With his characteristic eloquence, compassion, and grace, and always sensitive to the needs and anxieties of his listeners, Gomes offers readers the tools they need to understand the wisdom of the Bible and the joy and inspiration it can bring to everyday life.
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Editorial Reviews

David Gergen
Alternately bracing and soothing, these short pieces are a wonderful way to begin or end each day.
Alan K. Simpson
Provocative in his delivery, dazzling in his alliteration ... he can string words together in ways that penetrate right down deep.
James O. Freedman
With great learning and wit, Reverend Peter J. Gomes stirs our souls and stimulates our minds ...
Nathan Marsh Pusey
...One of the most dedicated, knowledgeable, articulate, and persuasive spokesmen for the Christian religion in the present secular age.
Library Journal
Best-selling author and religion professor Gomes (The Good Book: Reading the Bible with Mind and Heart, LJ 6/1/96) here collects 40 of his sermons, preached over the years to the congregation at First Memorial Church, Harvard University. These sermons address a variety of themes that revolve around the liturgical seasons, but Gomes's characteristic wit and unwavering ability to get to the heart of whatever matters with honesty, clarity, and eloquence will appeal to a wider audience of nonchurch goers. A man of formidable intelligence and political influence, Gomes indicates by these sermons that he is willing to stake everything on the mystery that is central to Christian faiththe life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, which forms the bedrock of Gomes's own biblical understanding. A highly readable book.
David Gergen
"Alternately bracing and soothing, these short pieces are a wonderful way to begin or end each day."
Alan K. Simpson
"Provocative in his delivery, dazzling in his alliteration ... he can string words together in ways that penetrate right down deep."
Nathan Marsh Pusey
"...One of the most dedicated, knowledgeable, articulate, and persuasive spokesmen for the Christian religion in the present secular age.."
James O. Freedman
"With great learning and wit, Reverend Peter J. Gomes stirs our souls and stimulates our minds ..."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780641044359
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/22/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 234

Meet the Author

Peter J. Gomes has been minister of Harvard University's Memorial Church since 1974, when he was appointed Pusey Minister of the church, and serves as Plummer Professor of Christian Morals. An American Baptist minister, he was named one of America's top preachers by Time magazine. He is the recipient of thirty-three honorary degrees and an Honorary Fellow of Emmanuel College, the University of Cambridge, England, where the Gomes Lectureship is established in his name.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr., a MacArthur Fellow, holds the W.E.B. Dubois Chair and is director of the African-American Studies Department at Harvard University. He won the American Book Award in 1989 for The Signifying Monkey.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Advent I

The Art of Impatient Living

Text: Be patient, therefore, brethren, until the coming of the Lord.          — James 5:7

I am going to ask you to do a very difficult thing, and that is to forget all the seasonal trappings that surround you and seduce you into thinking that Advent has anything at all to do with Christmas as you and I understand it; I wish that there was a way that I could make this all disappear. I want you to clear away all of the "let's get ready for Christmas" stuff, all of this manufactured cheer and happy expectation of something that once happened; clear the decks, rather, and get ready for something that has not yet happened, for that is the agenda of the entire season of Advent.

Having asked you to do that, now I ask you to think about an extraordinary set of verses from the Epistle of James: "Be patient, therefore, brethren, until the coming of the Lord..." The Lord is coming, not in retrospect, not in a rehearsal of things that happened once long ago. The Lord is coming in a way and in a form that we have not yet experienced. We wait for that which we have not yet seen. We work for that which has not yet been accomplished. That is the Advent agenda, and it is so often thrown off course by Christmas as simply a recollection of something that happened long ago and far away. The world is welcome to Christmas; we Christians hardly have any claim on it at all anymore; but Advent and its expectations, its call for patience, its earnest waiting — that belongs to us, and how we reconcile the patience of Advent with theimpatience of human, modern living is the problem and the opportunity of the moment.

Now one of the reasons that the Bible and the Christian faith lack credibility to most of us, one of the reasons that they are both unbelievable and uncompelling, is that they ask us to do things that are manifestly undoable. They ask us to believe things that, if not believable or true, are at least unlikely. One of the reasons that the Advent season is manifestly an unsatisfactory season for Christians is that it, too, is based on assumptions too difficult to accept, expectations too unreal to contemplate, a phantom of truths that do not conform with the facts.

We know what we are meant to believe; the lessons tell us, the prayers tell us, the hymns are full of it. Light over darkness, hope over despair, gentleness and meekness over might and power — these are all the clichés of Advent. We know that Advent is not meant to be merely a retrospective of things past but an anticipation of things to come. Advent is not Christmas but judgment, not cheap synthetic joy but divine and ultimate justice, and we know that as well.

Somehow we hope that the church will be that place where our impossible expectations and our manifest needs are met and reconciled. That is presumably why we keep coming week after week and year after year. We know that Jesus says that the meek shall inherit the earth but we do not believe that that is likely, or likely in any reasonable time. We know that we are to forgive those who have hurt us, but we also know that except in rare and wonderful circumstances it is very difficult to bring ourselves to do it. Today in James's epistle we hear that we are to be patient unto the coming of the Lord — yet one more case of a faiththat is too good to be true, of human aspirations flying in the face of human nature.

It is not our nature to be patient. I know this, for I am among the most impatient of people. Patience, some would say, like modesty, belongs to those who need it, and most people who need patience are people who have not yet succeeded in their ambition or their enterprise, people who have not yet achieved, either by their own standards or by our standards. In other words, patience is for failures, for losers, for wimps, for those who have to take the long view because they cannot succeed in the short run. Notice that it is always the achiever who tells the less-than-achieved to be patient, and how patronizing and silly it sounds. First it sounds patronizing and silly to the one who wants to succeed and who has not, and to whom the counsel of patience is discouraging. all pianostudents, for example, know this. Someone who is wonderfully adept at the piano says, "Oh, be patient. It will come." You don't believe it, and it is not a counsel of encouragement, it is a counsel of discouragement; and to the one who is not interested in achieving the skills in the first place, a counsel of patience is a further irritant and hardly a stimulus. All bad students of mathematics and arithmetic, for example, and all bad students in Hebrew, in Greek, in Latin, and in French know this. If you don't care, and you're not good, and someone tells you to be patient, that is an insult and an irritant.

Patience implies passivity, and we wish not to be passive, we wish not merely to be spectators at somebody else's spectacle of achievement. We want to do what it takes to get things done. We want the more agreeable counsel of James earlier in his epistle where he says, "Be ye doers of the word and not hearers only." That we can understand, for practical, sensible, questioning Christians like ourselves want always to know what we can do. We don't want to hear what we must endure or bear or suffer through. We don't want to be told to wait. We want to get on with it, whether it is worth getting on with or not.

Sermons copyright © by Peter Gomes. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All Rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Advent I: The Art of Impatient Living 3
Advent II: Hail, Mary, Full of Grace 9
Advent III: Humbug and the Christian Hope 16
Christmas Day: The House of Bread 22
New Year's Day: Beginning Where We Left Off 26
Epiphany I: Baptism 30
Epiphany II: Growing Up 37
Martin Luther King, Jr., Day: The Ambiguity of Heroes 42
Lent I: An Opportune Time 50
Lent II: Riches 55
Lent III: When Too Much Is Not Enough 62
Palm Sunday: Beyond Tragedy 68
Easter: When Life Begins 73
Eastertide I: Life on the Other Side 79
Eastertide II: Ordinary People 86
Ascension: The Absent and the Present Christ 92
Pentecost: The Gift of Understanding 98
Trinity: The Big Picture 102
Patriotism: The Purpose of Freedom 109
Happiness: The Beatitudes 114
Identity: Identity Crisis 120
Negotiation: Getting to Yes 126
Parables: The Kindness of Strangers 132
Miracles: What's in a Miracle? Feeding the Five Thousand 139
Friendships: Friendships and Relationships 143
Sisters: Mary and Martha 148
Frustration: The View from Pisgah 154
Depression: The Question at the Mouth of the Cave 159
Opportunity: Redeeming the Time 164
Communion: Acts of Reconciliation 170
Love: Acts of God 175
Perfection: The Trouble with Perfection 180
Wisdom: Wisdom and the Wise 185
Death: In the Midst of Life... 192
Stewardship: Time, Talent, and Treasure 198
The Bible: The Bible and the Believer 205
Behavior: Get Out of the Way 211
Mystery: The Mystery of Our Religion 217
Remembrance: The Fellowship of the Incomplete 225
Thanksgiving: Redeeming the Familiar 231
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2001

    Inspirational

    This is a life-affirming book. Readers should not read it from front to back but should browse through the book and pick sermons that speak to them. Trust me, eventually you will read them all several times. Whether you are a Christian or not there are lessons to be learned from the author. This is your life. Peter Gomes¿ Sermons will help you live it in a way that helps you make since of the hectic world around you. You will read it over and over again.

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