The Serpent's Daughter (Jade del Cameron Series #3)

( 5 )

Overview

Embark on a 'rollicking tale of adventure and suspense'(Library Journal) through 1920s Morocco-third in the acclaimed series, now in paperback.

Joining her mother for a holiday in the ancient port city of Tangier, American adventuress Jade del Cameron expects their trip will be far less dangerous than her safaris in East Africa. But soon after their introduction to a group of European tourists, Doña del Cameron goes missing-victim of an apparent kidnapping-and, shockingly, the ...

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The Serpent's Daughter (Jade del Cameron Series #3)

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Overview

Embark on a 'rollicking tale of adventure and suspense'(Library Journal) through 1920s Morocco-third in the acclaimed series, now in paperback.

Joining her mother for a holiday in the ancient port city of Tangier, American adventuress Jade del Cameron expects their trip will be far less dangerous than her safaris in East Africa. But soon after their introduction to a group of European tourists, Doña del Cameron goes missing-victim of an apparent kidnapping-and, shockingly, the French authorities seek to arrest Jade for the murder of a man whose body she discovered in a series of ancient tunnels. Now, Jade must call upon her friends to help find her mother and expose the true villains, who have every intention of bringing about her own destruction.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Set in 1920, Arruda's captivating third Jade del Cameron mystery (after 2006's Stalking Ivory) takes the feisty photojournalist and explorer to Morocco. Jade and her exceedingly proper mother, Inez, have agreed to meet in Tangier to try to mend their contentious relationship. When Inez is kidnapped, Jade's desperate search leads her first to Marrakech and then to a Berber village high in the Atlas Mountains, dodging drug smugglers, slave traders and Jade's old nemesis, Lilith Worthy. Arruda laces her story (sometimes a bit awkwardly) with the myths, history, customs and crafts of the people who live in Morocco and the Maghreb ("the land of the western sun"), particularly the little-known Berbers. Jade's escapades should appeal to fans of Elizabeth Peters's Amelia Peabody series or the Indiana Jones movies. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

In a gesture of peace, photographer and adventuress Jade del Cameron (Stalking Ivory; Mark of the Lion) agrees to meet her mother in 1920s Tangier. Unfortunately, Mrs. del Cameron-who believes her daughter should settle down-is promptly kidnapped. While a missing amulet, drug smuggling, a Berber tribe, and the return of the vindictive and dangerous Lilith Worthy add plot direction to this rollicking tale of adventure and suspense, the story takes as its focal point the mother-daughter relationship and the women's growing sense that they are more alike than they care to admit. Jade's World War I experience as an ambulance driver makes her resemble Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs, albeit a bit spunkier in that Jade reacts to bad situations à la Indiana Jones. There isn't much of a mystery here, but the rest is stellar. For historical mystery collections. [See Prepub Mystery, LJ9/1/07.]


—Jo Ann Vicarel
Kirkus Reviews
Intrepid adventuress is snagged in dangerous North African kidnap plot. Jade del Cameron hopes that a trip to exotic Morocco will be her chance for a rapprochement with her disapproving mother, Inez, who thinks that proper young ladies of 1920 don't gallivant around the globe flying airplanes and taking photographs. But Jade does, and occasionally solves mysteries as well (Stalking Ivory, 2007, etc.). Their touring party, a cross-section out of Agatha Christie-British missionary couple, American honeymooners, Spanish dowager et al.-has a perfectly pleasant dinner in a Tangier restaurant marred only by the discordant exchanges of Jade and Inez. Next morning, Jade can find no trace of Inez, and suspects abduction. A note leads her to a dark tunnel. There she finds a dead Moroccan with a knife in his back. She rushes to report the body to condescending local police detective Lieutenant Gervais, but when they return to the fatal spot, the corpse has disappeared. Gervais makes no attempt to hide his skepticism about the Moroccan murder and the peril to Inez, so it falls to Jade to investigate on her own. She's briefly reunited with Inez before they're separated again. A nemesis from one of Jade's previous escapades holds a key to the mystery, which also involves an amazing (and heretofore secret) fact about Jade's identity. A blithe and well-appointed period caper in which the author deftly avoids the tempting descent into camp.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451224651
  • Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/7/2008
  • Series: Jade del Cameron Series, #3
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 1,400,322
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Suzanne Arruda

Suzanne Arruda, a former zookeeper-turned-science teacher and freelance writer, is the author f several biographies for young adults. She has also published science and nature articles for adults and children and is a regular contributor to a weekly newspaper supplement. An avid hiker and outdoorswoman, she lives in Kansas with her husband, twin sons, and a small menagerie of pets.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Journey to Morocco in the 1920s

    This is the third book in the series by Suzanne Arruda. I enjoyed this entry much better than #2. The setting is exotic, the charcter development was much improved; I liked Jade's mother and the Berber natives of the Atlas Mountains. The mystery part kept my attention. It still seems in places that Jade is out-of-place for a woman in the 1920s, but overall I enjoyed the book.

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  • Posted April 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A fun Series

    Hate to use the word spunky but it defines Jade Del Cameron. There isn't a lock she can't pick, a scrape she can't get out of - or into, or a bad actor (gang or individual) she can't defeat. Never a shrinking violet, Jade abounds in shrewd deductions and a dizzying array of athletic daring do necessary to bring the most heinous villain to heal. Mix all that up with a travelogue of Africa and environs and you have a very fun read on a rainy afternoon

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Great New Heroine - Jade del Cameron

    I truly enjoyed "The Serpent's Daughter" - Jade del Cameron is a wonderful new heroine and the tales of her adventures are very exciting. Jade gets in and out of fantastic scrapes one after the other and is a resilient, courageous young woman. She's a terrific role model for today's young readers, too. Even though the stories are set in 1920's Africa (This book takes place in Morocco) Jade seems very modern (I can already imagine a movie series made from these wonderful tales).

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A terrific action-packed thriller

    In 1920, photojournalist Jade del Cameron reluctantly agrees to meet her prim and proper mother Inez in Tangier, Morocco in hopes they can reconcile their contentious relationship. However, Jade is realistic as she loves globetrotting explorations into out of the way trouble spots while mother is a perfect lady who never perspires let alone sweats.-------------- In Tangier, someone kidnaps Inez. An anxious Jade may feel the planet is not big enough for both of them, but she still loves her mother. She begins a frantic quest to find and rescue Inez with clues taking her to Marrakech and from there to a remote mountainous Berber village. Every step she takes step since starting in Algiers is dangerous especially eluding slave traders who want to sell her and the most dangerous person of all Lilith Worthy.---------------- This terrific action-packed thriller will grip readers from the moment Inez is abducted and never let¿s go until the final confrontation. The story lien is fast-paced especially when Jade is on mission. However, the plot slows down a bit as Suzanne Arruda packs the tale with a deep look at 1920 Morocco especially the Berbers. Fans of historical thrillers will want to read Jade del Cameron third adventure although the previous two contain more of a mystery (see STALKING IVORY and MARK OF THE LION).-------------- Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2011

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

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