Service at Its Best: Waiter-Waitress Training / Edition 1

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Overview

Designed for results and accountability, this #1 competency-based training guide covers everything a waiter or waitress needs to know to be successful in the today's dynamic and competitive restaurant industry—all organized within self-contained chapters that flow in a logical sequence and establish a step-by-step procedure for understanding and learning appropriate server skills. Discusses the occupational advantages and disadvantages of the job, along with job qualifications and descriptions or advancement opportunities for servers. Explains basic table settings for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and includes 25 tips for proper table service, such as the correct procedures for loading and carrying trays and techniques of carrying multiple plates. Explains wine varietals, as well as other spirits, cocktails, and coffees, and presents step-by-step illustrations of correct serving procedures. Covers current technology applications and their benefits, including table service management, guest paging system, product management software, hand-held touch-system terminal, server paging system, two-way radio, restaurant web sites, and other software technology used in the business. Shares the successful experiences of ten servers from across the United States. Appendices offer a handy reference source for common menu terms, wine terminology, spirit brands and related cocktails, ales, lagers, and non-alcoholic beers. For restaurant food server training programs in the hospitality, travel and tourism industries; also a handy reference manual for specific service questions.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130926265
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 11/28/2001
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 199
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Ed Sanders is the founder and editor in chief of the Hospitality News Group, which publishes regional foodservice industry newspapers and an international education guide. He is a Certified Food Executive and a Certified Purchasing Manager; his professional career has included being chief operating officer for a regional chain of restaurants, an associate professor of business, and procurement director of a large-volume foodservice operation. He has a master of science degree in international management from the American Graduate School of International Management, and a doctor of business administration degree in management and organization. He was the co-founder and director of industry relations for the Hotel, Restaurant and Resort Management Program at Southern Oregon University. He is also co-author of Foodservice Profitability, A Control Approach, 2E (Prentice Hall, 2001) and Catering Solutions: For the Culinary Student, Foodservice Operator, and Caterer (Prentice Hall, 2000).

Paul Paz has been a career professional waiter for over twenty years. Restaurants USA, Restaurants and Institutions, Nation's Restaurant News, The Washington Post, Principal The Wall Street Journal, and several other publications have featured him in his WaitersWorld profession. He has also appeared on ABC's 20/20 news show. His column, "Tips for Tips," runs regularly in the Hospitality News Group of newspapers and he has written numerous articles for other publications. Furthermore, he is a hospitality consultant and has presented a variety of seminars throughout the Pacific Northwest. He developed a number of training programs for the Oregon Restaurant Education Foundation and is the only professional waiter ever to serve on the Board of Directors of the Oregon Restaurant Association. The Association voted him the 1997 Restaurant Employee of the Year. He also has served as president of the National Waiters Association.

Ron Wilkinson is the founder and CEO of Profit Power Systems, developers of FoodcoCost Control Systems and AIMHIRE-Employee Selection Systems. He is also the founder and director of the International Food Service Foundation. His forty-year career has included owning and operating quick-serve, family, and formal dining restaurants, and he has been a training director and vice president of operations for several large restaurant chains. He has developed and written operational and service training manuals and has taught college foodservice and restaurant management courses. He has also served on academic advisory boards for restaurant and hospitality management programs. He has presented numerous workshops at food shows, hospitality association conferences, and restaurant chain management meetings. He is a recognized expert at maximizing profit for foodservice operations of all types.

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Read an Excerpt

Organization of Text

This book is written so that the chapters flow in a logical sequence, establishing a step-by-step procedure for understanding and learning appropriate server skills. The chapters are also self-contained, so that the reader can go directly to any chapter for specific information. Therefore, the book can be used as a training guide or a reference manual for specific service questions.

Chapter 1, "The Professional Waiter-Waitress," introduces the reader to restaurant industry statistics and income opportunities, and explains how tip credit is calculated. "'The Saturday Market Theory of Waiting Tables" reflects how a server takes ownership in his/her job. The nature of tipping and tip income reporting responsibility to the Internal Revenue Service are explained. Occupational advantages and disadvantages are identified, along with the job qualifications and descriptions of advancement opportunities for servers.

Chapter 2, "Professional Appearance," discusses the many aspects of grooming standards, the importance of poise and posture, the types of uniforms and aprons that may be used, the value of safe shoes, and the importance of server health.

Chapter 3, "Table Settings, Napkin Presentations, and Table Service," identifies the basic table settings for breakfast, lunch, and dinner as the table is preset and as the meal is served, along with the appropriate wine and beverage settings. The use of placemats and the correct placement of salt and pepper shakers, sugar and creamers, and rolls and butter are explained. Twelve popular napkin presentations are illustrated with detailed steps for each presentation, along with the correct procedure for placing tablecloths. The specific types of table service are explained in detail, including the following: butler service, American service (individual plate service), English service, Russian service, French service, as well as counter service, banquet service, and room service. The use of salad bars and dessert tables and carts is highlighted.

Chapter 4, "Serving Food and Beverages," sets forth 25 tips for proper table service, the correct procedures for loading and carrying trays, and the techniques of carrying multiple plates. Service priorities and timing along with effectively handling difficult situations are identified and supported with positive responses. Table bussing is detailed with procedures for using a cart or tray, as well as the procedure for setting up with the use of a tray, along with identifying additional bus attendant responsibilities.

Chapter 5, "Service Preparedness," illustrates breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus, along with a wine list. The importance of menu knowledge by the server is emphasized along with the role of the server in helping the guest understand the menu and menu terms. The responsibilities of a server that support good service include completing side-work as well as following opening and closing procedures. The chapter also discusses when service teams are appropriate and how they function.

Chapter 6, "Wine and Beverage Service," begins with identifying the proper temperatures for serving wines along with the correct procedures for using an ice bucket. The presentation and service of wine is illustrated step by step, beginning with presenting a bottle of wine to a guest, properly opening it, and the appropriate method of pouring the wine. The reasons and the procedure for decanting wine are also discussed. The various shapes of wine glasses are shown, identifying their appropriate use for the type of wine being served. Wine varietals are introduced and explained so that the reader gains a basic understanding of wine. Spirits and cocktails are discussed along with popular spirit brands, cocktail choices, and related terms the server should know. Beers, lagers, and ales are defined, and the correct procedure for serving beer is explained. Responsible alcohol service is reviewed and emphasized. The correct procedure for serving bottled waters is discussed. Coffee drinks that include espresso, cafe lattes, cappuccino, mochas, and the application of coffee with a spirit beverage are explained along with the use of the French press for coffee service. Tea varieties and service are also presented.

Chapter 7, "Guest Communications," begins with the server personally connecting with the guest through an individual sense of enthusiasm. Varieties of possible guest types are discussed, along with tips for anticipating the guest's needs and how to look for nonverbal cues and prompts. Suggestive selling is detailed, with techniques for selling the guest up, suggesting related menu items, suggesting new menu items or the chef's specialties, suggesting items for special occasions, and suggesting take-home items. The guidelines for suggestive selling are presented and illustrated, along with methods of dining room showmanship. The correct procedure for taking the guest's order is discussed, as is the guest check and the importance of service timing. Correct reaction in a professional manner to emergency situations is also addressed.

Chapter 8, "The Technology of Service," identifies the basic point-of-sale (POS) terminology and presents technology applications. Table service management, guest paging system, product management software, hand-held touch-screen terminal, server paging system, two-way radio, electronic comment response, and various software applications are discussed, along with the benefits of technology. The uses of restaurant websites, e-mail, and fax applications are reviewed, as is employee training with technology.

Chapter 9, "The Host/Hostess," begins with effectively greeting guests and table selection. Professional courtesies, handling complaints, taking telephone reservations and "to go" orders, server supervision, and menu meetings are all detailed in the discussion of the responsibilities of this important position.

Chapter 10, "Waiter-Waitress Profiles," reflects the successful experiences of 10 servers as interviewed by Brenda Carlos, publisher of the Hospitality News Group. The servers were selected from fine-dining, family, and casual theme-type restaurants from across the United States. They range from a national waiter contest award winner, career professional, to a student working as a server part-time. The AIMHIRE® software program can be accessed via the Internet and will introduce the reader/user to personality assessment software developed specifically for the foodservice industry.

Appendixes A, B, C, and D have been designed to provide the reader/user with a quick reference source for common menu terms; wine terminology; spirit brands and related cocktails; and ales, lagers, and non-alcoholic beers.

The video production Service At Its Best (ISBN 0-13-094792-X) further enriches this book with real-life applications that will inform and inspire the viewer. Contact Prentice Hall at 800-526-0485 or www.prenhall.com.

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Table of Contents

1. The Professional Waiter-Waitress.

2. Professional Appearance.

3. Table Settings, Napkin Presentations, and Table Service.

4. Serving Food and Beverages.

5. Service Preparedness.

6. Wine and Beverage Service.

7. Guest Communications.

8. The Technology of Service.

9. The Host/Hostess.

10. Waiter-Waitress Profiles.

Appendix A: Common Menu Terms.

Appendix B: Wine Terminology: General, Sight, Smell, and Taste.

Appendix C: Spirit Brands and Related Cocktails.

Appendix D: Ales, Lagers, and Non-Alcoholic Beers.

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Preface

Organization of Text

This book is written so that the chapters flow in a logical sequence, establishing a step-by-step procedure for understanding and learning appropriate server skills. The chapters are also self-contained, so that the reader can go directly to any chapter for specific information. Therefore, the book can be used as a training guide or a reference manual for specific service questions.

Chapter 1, "The Professional Waiter-Waitress," introduces the reader to restaurant industry statistics and income opportunities, and explains how tip credit is calculated. "'The Saturday Market Theory of Waiting Tables" reflects how a server takes ownership in his/her job. The nature of tipping and tip income reporting responsibility to the Internal Revenue Service are explained. Occupational advantages and disadvantages are identified, along with the job qualifications and descriptions of advancement opportunities for servers.

Chapter 2, "Professional Appearance," discusses the many aspects of grooming standards, the importance of poise and posture, the types of uniforms and aprons that may be used, the value of safe shoes, and the importance of server health.

Chapter 3, "Table Settings, Napkin Presentations, and Table Service," identifies the basic table settings for breakfast, lunch, and dinner as the table is preset and as the meal is served, along with the appropriate wine and beverage settings. The use of placemats and the correct placement of salt and pepper shakers, sugar and creamers, and rolls and butter are explained. Twelve popular napkin presentations are illustrated with detailed steps for each presentation, along with the correct procedure for placing tablecloths. The specific types of table service are explained in detail, including the following: butler service, American service (individual plate service), English service, Russian service, French service, as well as counter service, banquet service, and room service. The use of salad bars and dessert tables and carts is highlighted.

Chapter 4, "Serving Food and Beverages," sets forth 25 tips for proper table service, the correct procedures for loading and carrying trays, and the techniques of carrying multiple plates. Service priorities and timing along with effectively handling difficult situations are identified and supported with positive responses. Table bussing is detailed with procedures for using a cart or tray, as well as the procedure for setting up with the use of a tray, along with identifying additional bus attendant responsibilities.

Chapter 5, "Service Preparedness," illustrates breakfast, lunch, and dinner menus, along with a wine list. The importance of menu knowledge by the server is emphasized along with the role of the server in helping the guest understand the menu and menu terms. The responsibilities of a server that support good service include completing side-work as well as following opening and closing procedures. The chapter also discusses when service teams are appropriate and how they function.

Chapter 6, "Wine and Beverage Service," begins with identifying the proper temperatures for serving wines along with the correct procedures for using an ice bucket. The presentation and service of wine is illustrated step by step, beginning with presenting a bottle of wine to a guest, properly opening it, and the appropriate method of pouring the wine. The reasons and the procedure for decanting wine are also discussed. The various shapes of wine glasses are shown, identifying their appropriate use for the type of wine being served. Wine varietals are introduced and explained so that the reader gains a basic understanding of wine. Spirits and cocktails are discussed along with popular spirit brands, cocktail choices, and related terms the server should know. Beers, lagers, and ales are defined, and the correct procedure for serving beer is explained. Responsible alcohol service is reviewed and emphasized. The correct procedure for serving bottled waters is discussed. Coffee drinks that include espresso, cafe lattes, cappuccino, mochas, and the application of coffee with a spirit beverage are explained along with the use of the French press for coffee service. Tea varieties and service are also presented.

Chapter 7, "Guest Communications," begins with the server personally connecting with the guest through an individual sense of enthusiasm. Varieties of possible guest types are discussed, along with tips for anticipating the guest's needs and how to look for nonverbal cues and prompts. Suggestive selling is detailed, with techniques for selling the guest up, suggesting related menu items, suggesting new menu items or the chef's specialties, suggesting items for special occasions, and suggesting take-home items. The guidelines for suggestive selling are presented and illustrated, along with methods of dining room showmanship. The correct procedure for taking the guest's order is discussed, as is the guest check and the importance of service timing. Correct reaction in a professional manner to emergency situations is also addressed.

Chapter 8, "The Technology of Service," identifies the basic point-of-sale (POS) terminology and presents technology applications. Table service management, guest paging system, product management software, hand-held touch-screen terminal, server paging system, two-way radio, electronic comment response, and various software applications are discussed, along with the benefits of technology. The uses of restaurant websites, e-mail, and fax applications are reviewed, as is employee training with technology.

Chapter 9, "The Host/Hostess," begins with effectively greeting guests and table selection. Professional courtesies, handling complaints, taking telephone reservations and "to go" orders, server supervision, and menu meetings are all detailed in the discussion of the responsibilities of this important position.

Chapter 10, "Waiter-Waitress Profiles," reflects the successful experiences of 10 servers as interviewed by Brenda Carlos, publisher of the Hospitality News Group. The servers were selected from fine-dining, family, and casual theme-type restaurants from across the United States. They range from a national waiter contest award winner, career professional, to a student working as a server part-time. The AIMHIRE® software program can be accessed via the Internet and will introduce the reader/user to personality assessment software developed specifically for the foodservice industry.

Appendixes A, B, C, and D have been designed to provide the reader/user with a quick reference source for common menu terms; wine terminology; spirit brands and related cocktails; and ales, lagers, and non-alcoholic beers.

The video production Service At Its Best (ISBN 0-13-094792-X) further enriches this book with real-life applications that will inform and inspire the viewer. Contact Prentice Hall at 800-526-0485 or www.prenhall.com.

Read More Show Less

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