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Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts, Technology, and Design / Edition 1

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Overview

For years, Thomas Erl's Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts, Technology, and Design has been the definitive end-to-end tutorial on SOA, service orientation, and service technologies. Now, Erl and a world-class team of service experts have thoroughly updated their best-seller to reflect the new practices, technologies, and strategies that have emerged through the past decade of hard-won SOA experience.

Fully reflective of modern SOA environments, this Second Edition presents dozens of current case study examples, as well as 300+ diagrams that illuminate every key facet of creating, leveraging, and sustaining contemporary SOA. Erl and his colleagues guide you through every key phase of the SOA delivery lifecycle, from analysis and design through modern governance. Coverage includes:

  • How SOA has evolved: crucial lessons learned, and current best practices
  • Service technologies: WS-* and REST in contemporary environments
  • Service Orientation principles and techniques, including new approaches to Service Inventories
  • Building SOA: planning, analysis, modeling, technology, and design
  • Governing SOA, including new SOA Governance Frameworks and Vitality approaches
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Thomas Erl is a best-selling IT author and founder of CloudSchool.com™ andSOASchool.com ®. Thomas has been the world's top-selling service technology author for over five years and is the series editor of the Prentice Hall Service Technology Series from Thomas Erl (www.servicetechbooks.com ), as well as the editor of the Service Technology Magazine (www.servicetechmag.com). With over 175,000 copies in print world-wide, his eight published books have become international bestsellers and have been formally endorsed by senior members of major IT organizations, such as IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Intel, Accenture, IEEE, HL7, MITRE, SAP, CISCO, HP, and others.

Four of his books, Cloud Computing: Concepts, Technology & Architecture, SOA Design Patterns, SOA Principles of Service Design, and SOA Governance, were authored in collaboration with the IT community and have contributed to the definition of cloud computing technology mechanisms, the service-oriented architectural model and service-orientation as a distinct paradigm. Thomas is currently working with over 20 authors on several new books dedicated to specialized topic areas such as cloud computing, Big Data, modern service technologies, and service-orientation.

As CEO of Arcitura Education Inc. and in cooperation with CloudSchool.com™ andSOASchool.com ®, Thomas has led the development of curricula for the internationally recognized SOA Certified Professional (SOACP) and Cloud Certified Professional (CCP) accreditation programs, which have established a series of formal, vendor-neutral industry certifications.

Thomas is the founding member of the SOA Manifesto Working Group and author of the Annotated SOA Manifesto (www.soa-manifesto.com). He is a member of the Cloud Education & Credential Committee, SOA Education Committee, and he further oversees theSOAPatterns.org and CloudPatterns.org initiatives, which are dedicated to the on-going development of master pattern catalogs for service-oriented computing and cloud computing.

Thomas has toured over 20 countries as a speaker and instructor for public and private events, and regularly participates in international conferences, including SOA, Cloud + Service Technology Symposium and Gartner events. Over 100 articles and interviews by Thomas have been published in numerous publications, including the Wall Street Journal and CIO Magazine.

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Case Studies

Part I. SOA and Web Services Fundamentals
3. Introducing SOA and Service-Orientation
4. The Evolution of SOA
5. Service Technology and Primitive SOA

Part II. SOA and Service Technology
6. WS-* and Contemporary SOA
7. REST and Contemporary SOA

Part III. Service-Orientation
8. The Principles of Service-Orientation
9. Service Layers and Service Inventories

Part IV. Building SOA (Planning and Analysis)
10. SOA Delivery Strategies
11. Service-Oriented Analysis (Part I. Introduction)
12. Service-Oriented Analysis (Part II. Service Modeling)

Part V. Building SOA (Technology and Design)
13. Service-Oriented Design (Part I. Introduction)
14. Service-Oriented Design (Part II. SOA Composition Guidelines)
15. Service-Oriented Design (Part III. Service Design)
16. Service-Oriented Design (Part IV. Business Process Design)

Part VI. Governing SOA
17. SOA Governance Framework
18. SOA Vitality

Appendix A. Case Studies
Appendix B. Service Models Reference

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Preface

Service-Oriented Architecture: Concepts, Technology, and Design

Preface

Authoring this book involved nearly a year of writing, research, and staying on top of a subject matter that is constantly expanding its reach and importance. Although the majority of the chapters focus on service-oriented architecture from a vendor-neutral perspective, achieving an accurate representation of this perspective required that I spend a great deal of time evaluating SOA support in all primary vendor platforms. As part of this research stage I spoke with more than a hundred senior IT professionals, either through interviews or through my work as an awards judge evaluating platform submissions.

One of the most interesting facets of this project has been in defining service-orientation within the context of Web services. While studying the individual parts of what constitutes service-orientation as a paradigm, I came to realize just how many of its roots lie in past innovations. Yet at the same time, it is distinct, blending traditional and new concepts in support of a unique architectural model.

Despite its apparent "newness," SOA, on a fundamental level, is based on a very old and established school of thought. Service-orientation, as a means of separating things into independent and logical units, is a very common concept. As I progressed through these chapters, I began to notice this more often in everyday life. Items, people, organizations we come into contact with either offer some form of service or participate in performing a service. Once applied to technology architecture, though, service-orientation is concerned with a specific part of our service-oriented world: business automation.

Competitive business climates demand that corporations minimize redundant effort and maximize the expediency with which strategic goals can be achieved. Inefficient organizations that consistently waste resources are bound to fall behind. The manner in which an organization automates its business is a critical factor in determining the level of efficiency at which it operates and, ultimately, the extent of success it attains in its ventures.

This is what makes SOA so valuable. By shaping automation logic through service-orientation, existing investments can be leveraged, business intelligence can be accurately expressed, and inherent automation agility can be achieved. When coupled with the Web services technology platform, SOA offers a significant and real benefit potential that can transform the technology and outlook of an organization. My goal for this book is to help you explore, understand, and realize this potential.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Introduction

Preface

Authoring this book involved nearly a year of writing, research, and staying on top of a subject matter that is constantly expanding its reach and importance. Although the majority of the chapters focus on service-oriented architecture from a vendor-neutral perspective, achieving an accurate representation of this perspective required that I spend a great deal of time evaluating SOA support in all primary vendor platforms. As part of this research stage I spoke with over a hundred senior IT professionals, either through interviews or through my work as an awards judge evaluating platform submissions.

The most interesting facet of this work has been in defining service-orientation within the context of Web services. While studying the individual parts of what constitutes service-orientation as a paradigm, I came to realize just how many of its roots lie in past innovations. Yet, at the same time, it is distinct, blending traditional and new concepts in support of a unique architectural model.

Despite its apparent "newness" SOA is, on a fundamental level, based on a very old and established school of thought. Service-orientation, as a means of separating things into independent and logical units, is a very common concept. As I progressed through these chapters I began to notice this more often in everyday life. Items, people, organizations we come into contact with either offer some form of service or participate in performing a service. However, once applied to a technology architecture, service-orientation is concerned with a specific part of our service-oriented world: business automation.

Competitive businessclimates demand that corporations minimize redundant effort and maximize the expediency with which strategic goals can be achieved. Inefficient organizations that consistently waste resources are bound to fall behind and disappear. The manner in which an organization automates its business is a primary factor in the ultimate success of its ventures. This is what makes SOA so valuable. By shaping automation logic through service-orientation, existing work can be leveraged and inherent automation agility can be achieved.

Further, because service-orientation is a natural part of our world, automation designs that incorporate its principles can more accurately represent real world requirements. In other words, service-oriented solutions can be shaped to mirror business intelligence. This allows for an organization's automation environment to evolve in alignment with the business for which it is providing automation.

When coupled with service-orientation, the Web services technology platform offers some powerful ideals and a significant benefit potential that can transform both the technology and outlook of an organization. I hope you will enjoy exploring this potential as we delve into the world of SOA.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2008

    Very Good high level companion

    This book covers the complex process of planning, designing and implementing service-oriented architectures that meet organizational goals. It is an essential companion to any software developer, architect, or project manager implementing-or thinking about implementing-a service-oriented architecture.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2006

    SOA is a lot of work, but worth it

    Building SOA is all about doing the right things during the planning and analysis stages and the building on top of that foundation. That is a key thing I learned by reading this book - that and of course all of the things our company needs to specifically do to actually build the services. SOA is not revolutionary in my opinion, but it does shake things up quite a lot. It's all for the best, however. The benefits you are working toward when you invest in SOA are very attractive. After fully understanding what this platform is all about I can truly see why we should go ahead with some of the plans we've been mulling over. I was very impressed with the writing and the consistency with which this author introduces subjects and then builds on them, layer by layer with each subsequent chapter. This is a real tutorial on a very big subject matter and it does a great job of providing instruction and a lot of practical guidance.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2005

    A lot to cover

    It's a serious challenge to develop in SOA if you have never done this before. The field is still developing rapidly. Plus SOA has by now subsumed many standards or specifications. The totality of which is daunting to assimilate. Erl does a formidable job in helping you overcome these obstacles. In essence, he shows that SOA has 3 main parts - a service, its description, and messages that pass between services. Where a service encapsulates a piece of logic that is meant to be modular and reusable. This per se is really little different from subroutines, which have been with us since Fortran and Algol. After all, think of all those massive Fortran libraries that have been built up for scientific and engineering uses. But with SOA, a key difference is that the parts or players are inherently distributed over a network. Unlike the monolithic Fortran executables. The book shows that SOA potentially lets you build a loosely coupled, distributed system. Where the messages and descriptions play the pivotal part in enabling this. And these rest on XML, as the base technology. You should be versed in XML prior to commencing this book, especially with the usage of XML namespaces in defining terms. Also, if any of you have had experience in writing client-server programs, using Remote Procedure Calls, then the loose coupling of SOA can be attractive. RPCs invariably led to a tightly coupled system that was often hard to maintain and modify.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2009

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