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Serving Homeschooled Teens and Their Parents(Libraries Unlimited Professional Guides for Young Adult Librarians Series)
     

Serving Homeschooled Teens and Their Parents(Libraries Unlimited Professional Guides for Young Adult Librarians Series)

by Maureen T. Lerch, Janet Welch
 

Today more than a million students are being educated at home; and that figure increases at a rate of 7-14% annually. Homeschooling is a growing trend in our society, and public librarians are being called upon with increasing frequency to serve the needs of homeschooled students. So, just what are the needs of the homeschooled teen, and how can you and your

Overview

Today more than a million students are being educated at home; and that figure increases at a rate of 7-14% annually. Homeschooling is a growing trend in our society, and public librarians are being called upon with increasing frequency to serve the needs of homeschooled students. So, just what are the needs of the homeschooled teen, and how can you and your library meet those needs? A former young adult librarian and a homeschool parent have joined forces to create this insightful guide and answer that question. After reviewing the developmental and social needs of teens, the authors demonstrate how those needs may be met in the public library setting. You'll find a wealth of ideas for adapting every facet of your library service for this growing population—from developing a homeschool collection to expanding services and creating special programs. You'll also find suggestions on how to market what your library has to offer to homeschoolers. You may even discover some new ways to employ the talents and time of these students and their families. Extensive resource lists conclude the volume, they will help you better serve home-educated teens and their parents.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
This comprehensive toolbox for serving this often overlooked population is written by parties on both sides of the homeschool issue. Lerch, a librarian who overcame preconceived notions about homeschoolers, and Welch, a homeschooler who has a background in libraries, offer unique perspectives here. Lerch addresses prejudices that might block outreach, such as feeling that parents are incapable of teaching their children and fear of censorship issues from those with strong religious convictions. Welsh presents the other side, talking about what families really expect from their public library. A plan for establishing basic goals and different types of services and resources is presented through a series of forms, charts, and bibliographies, some with a religious slant. Because religious beliefs often add to the feelings of "differentness" that all teens have and contribute to the reason that many homeschooled teens do not participate in general teen programs, ideas are presented on how to draw in this audience and market for greatest impact. Many resources are needed to serve this population and the authors include recommended suppliers, periodicals, and Web sites to supplement an existing collection. Services that might have the most appeal to home-educating families, such as library tours, research instruction, and proctoring are highlighted. There is an extensive resource list of curriculum publishers, statewide homeschool organizations and state departments of education, online testing sites, distance learning sources, online magazines, and core collections. Also included are impressive further reading recommendations and a guide to creating one's own homeschool handbook. It is amuch-needed resource highly recommended for all libraries. 2004, Libraries Unlimited, 242p.; Index. Charts. Biblio. Source Notes. Further Reading. Appendix., $39 pb. Ages adult professional.
—Arlene Garcia
School Library Journal
The concept of this book is wonderful: a guide for librarians on how to better serve their homeschooled population. However, this is not a quick "how-do-I-deal-with-this-issue" manual. It reads more like a textbook. The authors begin by explaining what drives many people to homeschool their children and go on to describe different techniques. Their advice tends to be as time-consuming as reading the book: examine your collections, talk to parents of homeschoolers, talk to publishers of curricula, and possibly bring the two together. Many of the ideas seem very expensive, such as buying curriculum-supporting textbooks and special college guides aimed at homeschooled teens, which need to be updated often. Librarians are urged to go to Friends groups or apply for grants to create curriculum collections for this often-limited audience. The volume does include several bibliographies, though, and the list of books about the subject would be helpful to parents/families new to the process. A list of homeschooling organizations by state is also included.-Marlyn K. Beebe, City of Long Beach Public Library, CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780313320521
Publisher:
ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/30/2004
Series:
Libraries Unlimited Professional Guides for Young Adult Librarians Series
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.55(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

MAUREEN T. LERCH is a Reference/Outreach Librarian at the University of Akron Wayne College Library. She has served homeschooled teen patrons in the communities of Findlay, Louisville, and Orrville, Ohio.

JANET WELCH is Marketing and Public Relations Coordinator at Wadsworth Ella M. Everhard Public Library in Wadsworth, Ohio. A homeschooling mom, Welch is convinced that the public library is the greatest resource a homeschooler can have.

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