Serving on a Jury

Overview

How jury members are chosen;

A timeline, photos-what a juror's responsibilities are;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

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Overview

How jury members are chosen;

A timeline, photos-what a juror's responsibilities are;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The jury system is an important part of our judicial system. Jurors listen to the facts during a trial and vote on the verdict. Trial by jury began in Greece around 400 BC. A set of rules was established then to determine that jurors were chosen fairly. The jury system was adapted by the British in 1606 and came to North America with the colonists. When the colonies became the United States of America in 1776, trial by jury was an important part of justice in the original states. Now the process of selecting a jury begins with a computer search of drivers' license and voter registration files. The lawyers eliminate jurors they don't feel will be sympathetic to their clients before the trial begins. The jurors listen to the case and must reach a unanimous decision. If that doesn't happen, it is called a hung jury and a new trial is necessary. This informative book is easy to read with large type and lots of photographs. It is part of the "True Book" series on civics. 2002, Children's Press,
— Kristin Harris
School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Public Office explains what some of these elected jobs are and describes the election process from the filing of a petition to run for office through to the tallying of the votes. Jury provides some background history on the selection and responsibilities of juries and types of trials. The process of serving on a jury is described from the time a person receives the summons to serve through reaching a verdict on a case. Clearly written civic lessons with full-color photographs that reflect the diversity of the people in the U.S.-Pamela K. Bomboy, Chesterfield County Public Schools, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Kristen Kelley
Capua provides a basic history and overview of our jury system today. She begins by discussing the jury system of the ancient Greeks and the early settlers of America. Capua next explains the differences between civil and criminal jury trials. She then talks about the requirements for becoming a juror, being excused from jury duty, the juror selection process—including voir dire—and finally the responsibilities of jurors. Large, full color photographs of various courtroom scenes are included throughout, as well additional facts about trials, such as "[t]he total number of civil trials in the United States has steadily decreased since 1992" and "[i]n some states, judges can be called for jury duty." Capua also includes a timeline, a glossary, a list of statistics about juries, a list of additional resources, and an index. Part of the "A True Book" series, this book is an excellent introduction to an integral part of our justice system and helps prepare young students for their future citizenship responsibilities. A great resource for classrooms. Reviewer: Kristen Kelley
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780531262146
  • Publisher: Scholastic Library Publishing
  • Publication date: 9/1/2012
  • Series: A True Book
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 665,906
  • Age range: 7 - 9 Years

Table of Contents

1 A Jury's Duty: What is the difference between a criminal trial and a civil trial? 7

2 Meeting the Requirements: What does it mean to be an upstanding citizen? 15

Being Excused 18

3 Choosing the Jury: Why do jurors have to answer questions? 21

4 Hearing the Case: Can jurors go home each night during a trial? 31

5 Reaching a Verdict: Who can be the jury foreperson? 39

True Statistics 44

Resources 45

Important Words 46

Index 47

About the Author 48

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