Seven Decades Of The Union

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CHAPTER III. THE THIRD DECADE, FROM 181O TO 183O. Tecumseh and Tippecanoe—War with Great Britain ; how the declaration of it was got at, and Mr. Tyler's part in the War—The Attempt upon Canada— Genera) Scott, another War-made ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III. THE THIRD DECADE, FROM 181O TO 183O. Tecumseh and Tippecanoe—War with Great Britain ; how the declaration of it was got at, and Mr. Tyler's part in the War—The Attempt upon Canada— Genera) Scott, another War-made Man—The Nhvy on the Ooean and the Lakes—Blue-Lights—Cockburn at Hampton; General Taylor,another War- made Man—General Jackson—The Course of Connecticut and Massachusetts during the War—The Hartford Convention called by Massachusetts in the midst of the War—Peace saved the United States—After Peace, Imposts tor Protection—National Bank in 1817—The Colonization Socicty and the Republic of Liberia—The First Term of Mr. Monroe—His Conciliation of Federalism—His Cabinet—J. Q. Adams—W. H. Crawford—John C. Cal- houn—Internal Improvements—The Eric Canal by New York—The Seminole War—St. Mark's—Ponsacola and Fort Barrancas—Cession of Florida—Admission of Missouri—Ocean Steam Navigation, July I'll, ISl'J. Mu. Jewerson had the sagacity or the timidity, the prudence or the selfishness, to turn the responsibility aud the burden of the war with Great Britain over to his successor, Mr. Madison, whom General Jackson pronounced to be a President " not fit for blood and carnage." So it was that nearly five years elapsed from the time of the outrage by the Leopard on the Chesapeake, in 1807, before the Democracy ventured to make the declaration of war. Mr. Madison paused and parleyed for over .hrt-e years, and it was not without the most strenuous opposition that t e war was declared at last. Mr. Tyler often jocularly said that the question was got at rather by "spittoons" than by "national spirit," mid told an aneedote showing the spirit of the times in the Congress of the United States. Party spirit ran rankling to the most violent extremes. Not only was persona...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781145453449
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 2/23/2010
  • Pages: 330
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.69 (d)

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CHAPTER III. THE THIRD DECADE, FROM 181O TO 183O. Tecumseh and TippecanoeWar with Great Britain ; how the declaration of it was got at, and Mr. Tyler's part in the WarThe Attempt upon Canada Genera) Scott, another War-made ManThe Nhvy on the Ooean and the LakesBlue-LightsCockburn at Hampton; General Taylor,another War- made ManGeneral JacksonThe Course of Connecticut and Massachusetts during the WarThe Hartford Convention called by Massachusetts in the midst of the WarPeace saved the United StatesAfter Peace, Imposts tor ProtectionNational Bank in 1817The Colonization Socicty and the Republic of LiberiaThe First Term of Mr. MonroeHis Conciliation of FederalismHis CabinetJ. Q. AdamsW. H. CrawfordJohn C. Cal- hounInternal ImprovementsThe Eric Canal by New YorkThe Seminole WarSt. Mark'sPonsacola and Fort BarrancasCession of FloridaAdmission of MissouriOcean Steam Navigation, July I'll, ISl'J. Mu. Jewerson had the sagacity or the timidity, the prudence or the selfishness, to turn the responsibility aud the burden of the war with Great Britain over to his successor, Mr. Madison, whom General Jackson pronounced to be a President " not fit for blood and carnage." So it was that nearly five years elapsed from the time of the outrage by the Leopard on the Chesapeake, in 1807, before the Democracy ventured to make the declaration of war. Mr. Madison paused and parleyed for over .hrt-e years, and it was not without the most strenuous opposition that t e war was declared at last. Mr. Tyler often jocularly said that the question was got at rather by "spittoons" than by "national spirit," mid told an aneedote showing the spirit of the times in the Congress of the United States. Party spirit ranrankling to the most violent extremes. Not only was persona...
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