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Seven Stories Up [NOOK Book]

Overview

In this companion to Laurel Snyder’s Bigger than a Bread Box, a leap back in time and an unlikely friendship change the future of one family forever.
 
Annie wants to meet her grandmother.
Molly wishes she had a friend.
A little magic brings them together in an almost-impossible friendship.
 
When...
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Seven Stories Up

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Overview

In this companion to Laurel Snyder’s Bigger than a Bread Box, a leap back in time and an unlikely friendship change the future of one family forever.
 
Annie wants to meet her grandmother.
Molly wishes she had a friend.
A little magic brings them together in an almost-impossible friendship.
 
When Annie wakes up on her first morning at the Hotel Calvert, she’s in for a big surprise. There’s a girl named Molly in her bed who insists the year is 1937 and that this is her room! Annie’s not sure what happened, but when she learns that Molly’s never been outside the hotel, she knows it’s time for an adventure. Magic, fortune-telling, some roller skates, a rescued kitten, and the best kind of friendship make up the unforgettable story of two girls destined to change each other’s lives.
 
“Like Judy Blume before her, Laurel Snyder writes characters that feel like your best friend.” —Anne Ursu, author of The Real Boy


From the Hardcover edition.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
The year is 1987. Annie and her mom have made the trip from Atlanta to a private apartment within a closed-down Baltimore hotel in order to see Annie’s grandmother for the last time. For Annie, it is the first time she meets her grandmother. The old woman is dying, and they have come to pay their respects before she passes. But the old woman is bitter, and Annie’s mom has never had a good relationship with her, so their initial words are cross and toxic. When Annie falls asleep, it is with a sense of sadness about the visit. When she awakes, it is 1937. She is with a girl named Molly, who is sequestered in the same hotel apartment due to her parents’ concern for her health. Molly is all alone; her busy father, the hotel owner, almost never visits. Her mother and sisters are on a trip to Pittsburgh. It has been months since Molly has seen anyone except her nanny for more than a few minutes at a time. Annie’s visit—as mysterious and perplexing as it may be—is welcome! The girls engage in a series of adventures over the course of a few days’ time. It is only after the 1937 situation has been changed substantially that Annie begins to worry about the impact on the future. Is her mother still there? Is she? How will she get back, and what will become of them all? This is a tender story of love and family, a sensitive exploration of the importance of friendship and connection. Reviewer: Heidi Hauser Green; Ages 8 to 12.
School Library Journal
01/01/2014
Gr 4–6—Twelve-year-old Annie, visiting the dying grandmother she's never before met, awakes in 1937 and meets the woman all over again: a lonely girl of Annie's own age, locked away from the outside world of Depression-era Baltimore by her poor health and the wishes of her wealthy hotel-owning family. Together, the two girls seek adventures in the colorful city below. The story is ultimately about the transformative power of deep friendship and the ways new experiences can shape our lives, but Snyder also makes it about the social disparities between rich and poor, the meaning of family, standing up for oneself, and living life to the fullest. Not only is the author's well-researched 1937 Baltimore a vibrant and enticing character in its own right, but both Annie and Molly are utterly believable, engaging personalities. The perfectly paced time-travel conundrum is well balanced within the larger plot, and the entire book is imbued with the same sort of forward-driving adventure as Rebecca Stead's When You Reach Me (2009) or Laurel Snyder's Bigger Than a Bread Box (2011, both Random). A wide variety of readers will find this book wonderfully satisfying and hard to put down.—Rhona Campbell, Georgetown Day School, Washington, DC
Publishers Weekly
11/04/2013
Snyder returns with a story that, like her Bigger Than a Breadbox (2011), offers a relatable heroine and a touch of magic. When 12-year-old Annie Jaffin and her mother visit Annie’s estranged, dying grandmother in the shuttered Baltimore hotel she grew up in, the woman Annie encounters is angry and aggressive. After a strange storm, however, Annie wakes up 50 years earlier, in 1937, where she meets her grandmother as a curious, kind, and deeply isolated child. Molly spends her days cloistered away in her “Lonely Room” because of her asthma; she wished for a friend and has no clue that Annie is actually her granddaughter. Because Annie knows that Molly will live to old age, they escape Molly’s locked room via the fire escape and seize the day. Through their adventures, Molly’s eyes gradually open to the realities outside the hotel walls, while Annie worries about getting home and whether she’s changing the future for better or worse. Friendship, connection, and understanding are at the heart of this warm, introspective story about the events that shape a person. Ages 8–12. Agent: Tina Wexler, ICM. (Jan.)
From the Publisher
"Time travel is the least of the magic in the sublime Seven Stories Up, which gently and lovingly demonstrates how the right friend at the right time can heal a heart and even change a life. Like Judy Blume before her, Laurel Snyder writes characters that feel like your best friend. I wish I'd had this book when I was a kid; I would have read it a hundred times and slept with it under my pillow." —Anne Ursu, author of The Real Boy

"Friendship, connection, and understanding are at the heart of this warm, introspective story about the events that shape a person." Publishers Weekly

"
The perfectly paced time-travel conundrum is well balanced within the larger plot, and the entire book is imbued with the same sort of forward-driving adventure as Rebecca Stead’s When You Reach Me (2009) or Laurel Snyder’s Bigger Than a Bread Box (2011, both Random). A wide variety of readers will find this book wonderfully satisfying and hard to put down." —SLJ

"Snyder infuses her novel with a touch of magical realism (and, of course, time travel), and many readers will wonder what the grown-ups in their lives were like as kids. Filled with historical facts that weave seamlessly with the narrative, this is a heartwarming story about knowing, and truly understanding, your family."—Booklist

Kirkus Reviews
2013-10-23
A 12-year-old in 1987 time travels a half-century into the past and meets her own grandmother at the same age. Annie Jaffin and her mom visit Annie's grandmother, a woman she barely knows. The dying older woman still resides in the once-grand hotel her family owned and where she and her daughter, Annie's mom, grew up. The reunion is grim: Her bitter, angry grandmother hurls recriminations at the two. That night, Annie dons a sleep mask, her world goes dark, and…next morning, she's shocked to awaken in the hotel room of a girl called Molly who gradually reveals that it's 50 years earlier--and that her given name is Mary Moran: Annie's grandmother's name. Annie wisely keeps the relationship a secret. Molly, kept almost completely sequestered for health reasons, relishes this new "friend's" company, and the pair embark on a series of whirlwind adventures beyond the hotel's environs. The novel's premise is tantalizing, but its execution lacks true spark. The girls are likable, but characterizations are superficial; certain plot details are confusing; the Great Depression barely registers; and readers may wonder why neither girl is more curious about each other's time and lifestyle than she is. Youngsters may also wonder how the vivacious though depressed and lonely young Molly grew up to be such a tartar; they will see that some circumstances in her childhood seem to have changed so as to presage a happier future. A surprise at the end disappoints and doesn't resolve matters. Overall, there are some pleasures, but this is time travel lite. (author's note) (Fantasy. 9-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375899997
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 1/28/2014
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 1,306,380
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 500L (what's this?)
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

LAUREL SNYDER is the author of many books for kids, including Penny Dreadful, Any Which Wall, and Up and Down the Scratchy Mountains. A native of Baltimore, she now resides happily in Atlanta with her husband, Chris, their two small sons, and a cat and dog who get along admirably because they are exactly the same size.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 13, 2014

    This book is for fans of The Secret Garden, time travel, and fri

    This book is for fans of The Secret Garden, time travel, and friendship. Annie and her mom go to visit her grandmother before she dies. Molly is an old, cantankerous woman that is bitter about anything and everything. Annie goes to sleep that night and wakes up in 1937, next to a much younger version of her grandmother. Molly is a sickly little girl, locked in a room on the seventh floor of the hotel she calls home. Annie and Molly quickly become fast friends and start having grand adventures together. Soon Annie realizes that she isn't only changing the events of the past, but the entire future as well, and she isn't sure that's a good thing.

    Middle grade readers will love this charming book about two girls from different times and the impact they have on each other. Kids that believe in magic and second chances will particularly enjoy this story.

    The only negative was the idea that whenever the universe makes a mistake (like allowing a little girl to grow up isolated and bitter), magic will step in and make things right. However, that same theme gives kids something to hope for and appeals to their imaginative side.

    Content: Clean

    Source: I received a digital galley of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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