Seven Wonders: Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet

Seven Wonders: Everyday Things for a Healthier Planet

by John C. Ryan
     
 

Consider your way of life and the effect that you have on the planet, and ask yourself the following question: If everyone on Earth lived like you, what would the impact be on the natural world and its finite resources? Probably catastrophic. According to John Ryan, it's time for us to reexamine our actions and reconsider our options.
In Seven Wonders,<

Overview


Consider your way of life and the effect that you have on the planet, and ask yourself the following question: If everyone on Earth lived like you, what would the impact be on the natural world and its finite resources? Probably catastrophic. According to John Ryan, it's time for us to reexamine our actions and reconsider our options.
In Seven Wonders, Ryan informs readers of the extraordinary benefits of such familiar things as the bicycle, the ceiling fan, the clothesline, the condom, Thai food, the public library, and the ladybug - and how using them can help solve critical global problems such as air pollution, ozone layer depletion, and toxic pesticide runoff. Our high-consumption "American way of life" creates enormous ecosystem damage. John Ryan artfully demonstrates how we can adopt relatively easy ways to lessen this damage and, at the same time, improve the health of our shared natural environment and of our families.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
What do pad thai, the public library, ceiling fans, ladybugs, clotheslines, condoms, and bicycles have in common? According to Ryan, director of Northwest Environment Watch research center, all of these everyday items can make a difference in our planet's ecology. If Americans ate more grain and vegetablebased dishes like pad thai (Thai noodles), both their bodies and their environment would be healthier. Using a public library for reading and research reduces the need for personal copies of books and newspapers, and saves forests from destruction. Cooling homes with energysaving ceiling fans instead of electricityguzzling air conditioners would reduce air pollution and save money. Ladybugs eat millions of cropdestroying aphids without the use of harmful pesticides. Earthfriendly clotheslines dry clothes simply, silently, and effectively, while reducing the wear and tear to garments caused by prolonged dryer cycles. The use of condoms stops the spread of disease and helps prevent unwanted pregnancies, both of which have a vast impact on world economics. Using a bicycle instead of a car reduces pollution and contributes to a healthier lifestyle. Although readers may not immediately scrap their cars and appliances and swear off hamburgers, Ryan's persuasive and anecdotal little book will certainly cause some readers to rethink their choices. Students who need a nonfiction book for a report will find Seven Wonders an informative and appealing choice. Teachers can read the brief chapters aloud in class to engender some lively discussions. Source Notes. Appendix. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School,definedas grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 1999, Sierra Club Books, Ages 12 to 18, 99p, $12.95 Trade pb. Reviewer: Jamie S. Hansen

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578050383
Publisher:
Sierra Club Books
Publication date:
10/03/1999
Pages:
110
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.25(d)

Meet the Author

John C. Ryan is the former Research Director at Northwest Environment Watch, and the author of Over Our Heads and Stuff: The Secret Lives of Everyday Things. Northwest Environment Watch is an independent, not-for-profit research center based in Seattle. Its mission is to foster a sustainable economy and way of life throughout the Pacific Northwest.

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