Seventh Sojourn

( 4 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
Despite the presence of a pair of ballads -- one of them "New Horizons" by Justin Hayward the latter's most romantic number since "Nights in White Satin" -- Seventh Sojourn was notable at the time of its release for showing the hardest-rocking sound this band had ever produced on record. It's all relative, of course, compared to their prior work, but the music is comparatively stripped down here, and on a lot of it Graeme Edge's drumming and John Lodge's bass work comprise a more forceful and assertive rhythm section than they had on earlier records, on numbers such as "Lost in a Lost World," "You and Me," and "I'm Just a Singer In a Rock & Roll Band." The latter, ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Bruce Eder
Despite the presence of a pair of ballads -- one of them "New Horizons" by Justin Hayward the latter's most romantic number since "Nights in White Satin" -- Seventh Sojourn was notable at the time of its release for showing the hardest-rocking sound this band had ever produced on record. It's all relative, of course, compared to their prior work, but the music is comparatively stripped down here, and on a lot of it Graeme Edge's drumming and John Lodge's bass work comprise a more forceful and assertive rhythm section than they had on earlier records, on numbers such as "Lost in a Lost World," "You and Me," and "I'm Just a Singer In a Rock & Roll Band." The latter, authored by Lodge, was -- along with Lodge's "Isn't Life Strange" -- one of two AM radio hits that helped drive the sales of this album, issued in early November of 1972, past all previous levels. Indeed, it was with the release of this album that the Moodies achieved their great commercial success in America and around the world, with a "Grand Tour" that kept them on the road for much of the year that followed. The irony was that it was all about to end for them, for years to come, and the signs of it were all over this record -- Seventh Sojourn took a long time to record, and a lot of the early work on it had to be junked "Isn't Life Strange" was one of the few early songs to get completed; it was clear to all concerned except the fans that, after six years of hard work in their present configuration, they all needed to stop working with each other for a time, and this was clear in the songs -- many have a downbeat, pensive edge to them, and if they reflected a questioning attitude that had come out on recent albums, the tone of the questioning on songs like "Lost in a Lost World," "You and Me," and "When You're a Free Man" had a darker, more desperate tone. Perhaps the group's mostly youthful, collegiate audience didn't notice at the time because it fit the mood of the times -- the album hit the stores in America the day before Richard Nixon's landslide presidential re-election victory the culmination of events behind the scenes that would subsequently drive him from office. But the members were not working well together, and this would be the last wholly successful record -- difficult as it was to deliver -- that this lineup of the band would record, as well as the last new work by the group for over five years. And oddly enough, even amid the difficulties in getting it finished, Seventh Sojourn would offer something new in the way of sounds from the group -- Michael Pinder, in particular, introduced a successor to the Mellotron, with which he'd been amazing audiences for six years, in the form of the Chamberlin, which is all over this album.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 5/20/1997
  • Label: Polydor / Umgd
  • UPC: 042284477321
  • Catalog Number: 844773

Album Credits

Performance Credits
The Moody Blues Primary Artist, Multi Instruments
Justin Hayward Guitar, Vocals
John Lodge Bass, Guitar, Vocals
Michael Pinder Keyboards, Vocals
Ray Thomas Bass, Flute, Vocals
Graeme Edge Drums
Technical Credits
Justin Hayward Contributor
John Lodge Contributor
The Moody Blues Art Direction, Instrumentation
Michael Pinder Contributor
Ray Thomas Contributor
Graeme Edge Contributor
Tony Clark Producer, Engineer
Tony Clarke Producer, Engineer
Robert Margouleff Mastering
Brad S. Miller Producer
Patricia Miller Producer
John Reed Liner Notes
Derek Varnals Engineer
Phil Travers Artwork, Cover Design, Cover Art
Adrian Van Velsen Mastering
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    I wish every Moody Blues fan, and even some that aren't fans, could hear this album. The songs are of exceptional quality, and the Moodies really put them across well. Especially Justin Hayward, whose songs "New Horizon" and "The Land of Make Believe" are two of the loveliest songs he's ever done. I sometimes wish there were more songs, like the ones on this album, on the radio today. If you don't have this album, get it! It really is wonderful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The best Moody Blues Album available

    I have all of the Moody Blues albums from 1967-1972 and "Seventh Sojourn" has the best collection of songs compared to the rest of the albums. Even though an overal theme is not too present compared to "Days of Future Past" and "Question of Balance," the quality of all the songs does not need a theme. This is the best and the second most original Moody Blues album (Days of Future Past #1).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A must have for any Moody Blues fan

    While this is not my personal favorite , it is the most commercial of the 7 concept albums . It is a stylistic bridge to the band's later work . The weakest cut is When You're A Free Man . Even though it marked the end of the band's 2nd incarnation ( remember Go Now ) it really doesn't come off that way . I have 12 of their albums , including all 7 concept albums ( in vinyl and CD ) and this is the one I would recommend to the casual fan . This is the first art rock band that was commercially successful . King Crimson , E L P and Yes all came later . It is unfortunate that this , last album arrived at a time when the art rock era was just starting . It actually propelled sales of the band's earlier work . The band would have even more wildly popular had Days Of Future Past been released in 1971 instead of 1967 . This is the only album of their's to be released during tha art rock era and by the time they got back together , the era had passed .

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews