Sewing for Dummies

( 32 )

Overview

Do you love to sew—or want to learn how? Then this book will have you in stitches in no time. There’s nothing like the feeling of completing a project using beautiful fabrics and great timesaving tools and then sharing it with your family and friends. Plus, learning to sew will save you money too! Before long, you’ll be stitching your own hems, repairing split seams, sewing on buttons, and much, much more.

Sewing For Dummies is a book for both absolute beginners and experienced ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $9.60   
  • New (1) from $65.00   
  • Used (2) from $9.60   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$65.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(113)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sewing For Dummies

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 45%)$19.99 List Price

Overview

Do you love to sew—or want to learn how? Then this book will have you in stitches in no time. There’s nothing like the feeling of completing a project using beautiful fabrics and great timesaving tools and then sharing it with your family and friends. Plus, learning to sew will save you money too! Before long, you’ll be stitching your own hems, repairing split seams, sewing on buttons, and much, much more.

Sewing For Dummies is a book for both absolute beginners and experienced sewers. If you’re a stone-cold beginner, you’ll find everything you need to know to sew beginning-level projects—and the book doesn’t assume that you’ve ever even picked up a needle and thread before. If you’ve had some experience with sewing, you’ll find tips and tricks that it took author Janice Saunders Maresh, a nationally known sewing and serging instructor, years to pick up! You’ll discover how to:

  • Master hand and machine stitches
  • Read a sewing pattern
  • Hem a variety of fabrics
  • Negotiate sleeves and pockets
  • Install zippers, buttons, and other fasteners
  • Shape garments with tucks and pleats
  • Adjust projects for better fit and function

This updated edition features a fresh 8-page color insert of all the new home decorating projects, including new patterns and instructions for a traditional living room with slipcovered couches and throws; a French country dining room with drapes and slipcovered chairs; and a bedroom with shams, duvets, dustruffles, and window treatments, as well as:

  • a bathroom with a shower curtain and towels
  • hip and funky tote bags
  • the perfect little black dress

Complete with lists of quick fix-it tools, sewing fundamentals, and sewing resources, Sewing For Dummies, 2nd Edition, is the fun and easy way® to get the basics and stitch up a storm in no time!

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764568473
  • Publisher: Wiley, John & Sons, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/11/2004
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 9.14 (w) x 7.44 (h) x 0.87 (d)

Meet the Author

Jan Saunders Maresh is a nationally known sewing instructor, educator and journalist, and has worked as the education director for Viking Sewing Machine Company and as the director of consumer education for JoAnn Fabrics and Crafts. She is the bestselling author of 13 sewing books and a frequent guest on national sewing TV shows.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction.

Part I: Hardware and “Softwear” for Sewing.

Chapter 1: Assembling Your Sewing Kit.

Chapter 2: Selecting Fabric, Findings, and Interfacing.

Chapter 3: Closing In on Threads and Other Closers.

Chapter 4: Working with Patterns.

Part II: Sewers! Start Your Engines!

Chapter 5: Sewing 101.

Chapter 6: Sewing Sensational Seams.

Chapter 7: Hems and A-Ha’s.

Part III: Fashion Fundamentals.

Chapter 8: Shaping Things Up.

Chapter 9: Zippers and Company.

Chapter 10: Sleeves: The Long and the Short of It.

Chapter 11: A Pocket Full of Ideas.

Chapter 12: Making the Little Black Dress.

Part IV: Sewing for the Home.

Chapter 13: Home Decor Sewing: The Cure for Decoraphobia.

Chapter 14: Quick-Change Table Toppers.

Chapter 15: Praiseworthy Pillows.

Chapter 16: Wowing Up Your Windows.

Chapter 17: Making Ho-hum Linens Luxurious.

Chapter 18: Give Your Furnishings a Face-lift with Slipcovers.

Part V: Alterations and Quick Fixes.

Chapter 19: Too Short, Long, Tight, or Loose? 12 Ways to Fix It Quick.

Chapter 20: Making Repairs on the Run.

Part VI: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 21: Ten Tips for Mixing Prints.

Chapter 22: Ten Mistakes Beginners Often Make.

Chapter 23: Ten Sewing Fundamentals to Remember.

Appendix: Sewing Resources.

Index.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Sewing For Dummies


By Janice Saunders Maresh

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-6847-7


Chapter One

Assembling Your Sewing Kit

In This Chapter

* Putting together the tools you need for sewing

* Pressing tools and why they matter

* Figuring out which sewing machine parts do what

Like most hobbies, successful sewing projects begin with a few good tools and a little know-how. Sure, you can collect some of these tools from your household: Those old scissors from the garage, the ruler from your desk drawer, and pins scavenged from freshly opened dress shirts, but you'll have a better sewing experience by using the tools intended for the job.

In this chapter, I list and explain the necessities - the tools I use just about every time I sew and that are essential for creating the projects in this book. I also give you some tips about additional tools that come in handy as your skills improve. So you can consider these tools your Sewing Survival Kit.

TIP

Keep your Sewing Survival Kit in a small fishing tackle box (other than your sewing machine and pressing tools, of course) or use one of the many sewing or craft organizers available through your local fabric store, craft store, or sewing machine dealer. Choose an organizer that has a handle and a secure latch so that you can easily carry it without dumping stuff all over the place.

Use the following as a checklist when you round up the tools for your Sewing Survival Kit; afterward, read the rest of this chapter to understand how each one works:

  •   Tape measure
  •   Dressmaker's shears
  •   Trimming scissors
  •   Fabric markers for light and dark fabrics
  •   Glass-head pins and pincushion (wrist or magnetic)
  •   Hand needles
  •   Sewing machine needles
  •   Seam ripper
  •   Invisible or removable transparent tape

Making Sure Your Sewing Measures Up

You use a tape measure for taking your own measurements, checking measurements on a pattern, and other measuring tasks. (See Chapter 4 for more information on patterns.)

All kinds of tape measures are available. I recommend that you use a plastic-coated fabric tape measure. This tape doesn't stretch, so you always get accurate measurements. Most tapes are 5/8-inch wide, the width of a standard seam allowance (see Chapter 6 for more on seams), and 60 inches long, like the tape measure in Figure 1-1. Many tapes come with both metric and imperial measurements and are two-toned, so you can readily see when the tape is twisted.

TIP

Keep your tape measure handy by draping it around your neck, but remember to take if off when you leave the house - no one ever believes in this fashion statement.

NICE TO HAVE

One of my favorite rulers is a clear O'Lipfa ruler. It's 24 inches long and 5 inches wide, and is marked into quarter-inch increments across the width of the ruler - handy for cutting even strips in many home decor projects. (Read the following section to find out about rotary cutters.) The ruler and the mat together work like a T-square - helpful when marking and cutting perfect 90-degree squares or rectangles and for cutting strips. You can find a lot of clear rulers on the market - many longer than my ruler, but I find that I use my O'Lipfa almost every time I sew.

Cutting Up (Without Cracking Up)

If I could have only two cutting tools, I'd use the following:

  •   8-inch bent dressmaker's shears: Shears are the best tool for cutting fabric. They have one straight and one bent-angle blade, a round thumbhole, and an oblong finger hole for comfortable, accurate cutting. The bent-angle blade gives your index finger a place to rest when you have a long cutting job. The bend in the blade also prevents you from lifting the fabric off the table, ensuring a more accurate cut.
  •   5-inch trimming scissors: These scissors have straight blades and two round holes for your finger and thumb. They come in handy for trimming smaller areas on a project and for clipping threads.

TIP

When shopping for shears or scissors, make sure that you test them on a variety of fabrics. They should cut all the way to the tips of the blades.

Some brands of scissors and shears are made of lightweight aluminum alloy. The lightweight models generally fit more comfortably in your hand, are usually a little cheaper than other models, and can be resharpened several times. However, with some brands, the lighter-weight blades may not cut as easily through heavy fabrics or multiple-fabric layers.

Steel scissors and shears are heavier, which means they easily cut through heavier fabrics and more fabric layers. Because each blade is made of one solid piece of steel, you can resharpen heavy scissors and shears more times than the lightweight variety, and they often stay sharper longer, too. But the heavier models are generally more expensive than their lightweight counterparts.

Regardless of the weight, scissors and shears with a screw joining the blades generally cut heavier fabrics and more layers than those that are riveted.

WARNING!

After you've plunked down money for a good pair of scissors and shears, don't let the family get hold of them and cut plastic, cardboard, wire, or anything you don't normally cut when sewing. The blades become rough and dull and not only will they chew or snag your fabric, but they also wear out your hand when you try to use them.

I also often use a pair of 3-inch embroidery scissors. The pointed blades are perfect for cutting out unwanted stitches and trimming laces, appliques, and hard-to-reach places.

After you decide you like to sew, treat yourself to a rotary cutter, which looks a lot like a pizza cutter, and a cutting mat, which protects the table and helps keep the rotary blade sharp. You use these tools without lifting the fabric off the cutting mat, so you can cut lines very accurately. Rotary cutters come in several sizes - I like the largest model because you can cut more, faster. But don't discard your shears; you need them for cutting intricate pattern pieces.

NICE TO HAVE

Cut edges can mean frayed edges, but you can put a stop to that with seam sealant. Seam sealant is a liquid that dries soft and clear so that you don't see any residue on the fabric and it won't snag or scratch. It comes in a small plastic bottle with a tip for easy aim. Dot it on a knot to prevent threads from coming out and dribble a bead at the cut edges of ribbon to prevent fraying.

Making Your Mark

Sewing is an exact science, in many ways. When you sew, you must match up the pieces of your project precisely - otherwise you get the left sleeve in the right armhole and end up feeling like you're walking backwards all the time (find out more about sewing in sleeves in Chapter 10).

To help you match up your fabric pattern pieces exactly the right way, the pattern for a project includes match points, called notches and dots, which are printed right on the pattern tissue. To use these match points, lay the pattern tissue down on the fabric, pin the tissue to the fabric, cut out the pattern piece, and clip the notches and mark the dots from the pattern tissue to the fabric. (See Chapter 4 for more information on cutting out and marking patterns.)

Fabric markers made especially for sewing make transferring match points from the pattern to the fabric a quick and easy task. Use one of the following markers, depending on the kind of fabric you want to mark:

  •   Disappearing dressmaker's chalk: Excellent for marking dark fabrics, dressmaker's chalk disappears in about five days or when you wash or iron the fabric.
  •   Wash-out pencil: This pencil shows up well when marking dark fabrics and erases with a drop of cold water. It looks like a regular pencil with white, pink, or light blue lead.
  •   Vanishing marker: Best for marking light-colored fabrics, this felt-tipped marker usually has pink or purple ink that disappears in 12 to 24 hours, unless you live in a humid climate where marks can disappear in minutes.
  •   Water-erasable marker: This felt-tipped marker for light to medium-colored fabrics has blue ink that disappears with clear water or by washing the fabric. This marker works better than the vanishing marker if you sew in a humid environment.

WARNING!

The ink in vanishing and water-erasable markers uses a chemical that may react to the dyes and chemicals in synthetic fabrics. Always test markers on a scrap of fabric to make sure that you can remove the mark and that it doesn't come back when you press the fabric.

NICE TO HAVE

  •   Invisible or removable transparent tape: These are useful but not essential marking tools. Invisible tape has a cloudy appearance that you can easily see on most fabrics. Removable tape has the same adhesive as sticky notes and doesn't pull off the nap (fuzz) from velvet, corduroy, or velour. I use 1/2-inch-width invisible or removable tape as a stitching template for sewing in a zipper (see Chapter 9), as a guide for straight stitching (I talk about stitches in Chapter 5), and for a lot of other little jobs. Hide it from your family, though, or it may disappear when you really, really need it.

Pinning Down Your Projects

You need pins to sew. Period. You use them to pin the pattern to the fabric, pin the pieces of fabric together before sewing them, and for several other pinning jobs. Because pins are such a constant companion when you sew, buy some that keep your fingers happy.

I recommend using long, fine, glass-head pins. The glass head fits comfortably in your fingers when you pin through multiple layers of fabric, and the extra length makes pinning more secure. Plus, if you accidentally press or iron over the glass heads, they don't melt like the plastic ones may.

You also need a place to keep your pins. Some pins, like glass-head pins, come packaged in convenient plastic boxes that make great pin holders. But to save time, I wear a wrist pincushion so that my pins stay with me wherever I go.

NICE TO HAVE

A magnetic pincushion, available in a wrist or tabletop model, is handy in your cutting area and at the ironing board. Besides pins, small scissors and a seam ripper also stick to the magnetized surface. The magnetic cushion is also wonderful for picking up pins and stray metal objects that fall on the carpet.

WARNING!

Even though computerized sewing machines have improved, avoid getting the tabletop magnetic pincushion near yours because you may wipe out the machine's memory.

Pressing Issues

Why are you delighted when someone asks if your pie is homemade but insulted when someone points to your dress and asks, "Did you make that?" In sewing, if someone can immediately tell that your project is homemade, it's probably because something just looks ... wrong. Usually this happens because the project wasn't pressed properly during construction. Using the right tools for pressing is just as important to sewing as using a sharp needle and thread that matches your fabric. Good pressing tools mean the difference between a project that looks good and a project that looks great.

Consider these points when choosing your tools:

  •   Iron: You need a good iron. I didn't say an expensive one - just a good one. Choose an iron that has a variety of heat settings and can make steam. Also, choose an iron that has a smooth soleplate (the part that heats up) and is easy to clean.

TIP

If you use fusible products, such as iron-on patches that melt when heated, you can easily gum up the iron. A non-stick soleplate makes it easy to clean and provides a smooth, slick surface for trouble-free pressing and ironing. Also, several newer brands of irons automatically turn off every few minutes, which is a real pain when you're ready to use the iron for sewing, so avoid buying an iron with this feature.

  •   Ironing board: Make sure you buy a padded ironing board. Without the padding, seams and edges press against a hard, flat surface that scars the fabric. This scarring shadows through to the right side of the fabric, so when a seam is pressed open it can look like ski tracks on either side of the seamline. The finished project has a shiny, overpressed look that's tough - if not impossible - to remove.

Choose a muslin or nonreflective ironing board cover: The silver, reflector-type covers are too slippery and sometimes get too hot, causing unnecessary scorching on some synthetic fabrics.

  •   Press cloth: A press cloth is essential for pressing a variety of fabrics, from fine silks to heavier woolens and wool blends. You place the press cloth between the iron and the fabric to prevent shine and overpressing. Use a clean, white or off-white 100-percent cotton or linen tea towel or napkin, or purchase a press cloth.

WARNING

If you're considering a print or color-dyed fabric for a press cloth - don't do it. Dyes can bleed through and ruin your project. Terry cloth isn't a good choice, either. The napped surface of a terry cloth towel can leave the familiar terry texture on the fabric.

A professional dressmaker friend of mine loves using a cloth diaper for a press cloth. The diaper is white and absorbent, can be doubled or tripled depending on the use, and is a good size for many projects.

NICE TO HAVE

After you decide to make sewing a regular hobby and you feel comfortable investing a little extra money into your projects, consider purchasing the following tools:

  •   Seam roll: This fabric cylinder measures about 12 inches long by 3 inches in diameter. You use the roll to press seams open without leaving tire tracks on either side of the seam. Because of the shape of the seam roll, the seam allowance falls away under the iron and doesn't press through to the right side of the fabric.
  •   Tailor's ham: This stuffed, triangular-shaped cushion has several curves on it that simulate the curves on your body. You use the ham to press and shape darts, side seams, sleeves, and other curved areas on a garment.

    Continues...

Excerpted from Sewing For Dummies by Janice Saunders Maresh Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 32 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 16, 2011

    I adore this book.

    I have the paperback. I taught myself to sew 7 years ago using this book. I could not be w o it now. Its still my go to.

    15 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    Great for beginners!

    I am taking an Intro to Sewing class through our Parks and Rec Dept. and this book is our bible. It is easy to read and understand. It is broken down into different chapters that address what you need so you don't have to read the whole thing. You can just go to the section you have a question on and it will walk you through it step by step. If you are just wanting to learn the basics of sewing this book is great!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    Great reference book for all people who sew

    I really like this book. I have been referencing this book for months now. I love the great points it provides.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Tap Here

    THIS BOOK IS TEACHING ME EVERYTHING ABOUT SEWING AND I AM GETTING A SEWING MACHINE IN 2 WEEKS SO EXCITED ABOUT THAT

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2000

    Easy and Friendly

    This book is a delightful read and a must for all endeavoring to make their own clothing. Ms. Saunders makes the reader feel like she is a best friend -- a fantastic sewer that is always ready to help a novice in a pinch. Inspiring sewing projects are detailed for all skill levels.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Great for beginning or intermediate sewing

    Very explanatory plus illustrations, They don't work well for iPhone but they work well on windows nook

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    Rocketa

    HEYO!!!!

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Stupid

    This is a stupid book when your on page 52 its showing u the contents nobody should get it i dont even want to give a star but i have i it was me i would the buissness down thats for right now

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    Meryl

    A brunette with sharp blue eyes walks in. "Can I join?"

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2013

    Kai to hunter

    It was but ok and im not gonna die from that ill get weakened but not parish (he flies away)

    0 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2013

    Kat

    Walked in staring at the soldier

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2013

    If you read any of the books for dummies...................

    You are one!

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2013

    Kaelin

    Grrrrrrr fuc<mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm> <mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm> <mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm> hehe.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2013

    Kai

    Got to go to my leaf bed its a full moon dont wanna turn into a great ape and thanks for listen he flies off

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2013

    Martha to Lightning

    Martha runs SOOOOOOOOOOOOO fast to her nest and ripped EVERYTHING. "IN YOUR FA-HACE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!" She laughed maniacally.

    0 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    RISSENCREST TO SIERRA

    Seliena????

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    Great book

    Love it

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 24, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Good aid for basic instruction

    Glad I purchased -

    Have yet to see how it will help in everyday instruction in numerous areas -

    The dummy part I could do without, but have to acknowledge that I needed the
    very basics!

    Sincerely
    Looking to Grow

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)