Sex and Race, Volume 1: Negro-Caucasian Mixing in All Ages and All Lands -- The Old World [NOOK Book]

Overview

In the Sex and Race series, first published in the 1940s, historian Joel Augustus Rogers questioned the concept of race, the origins of racial differentiation, and the root of the “color problem.” Rogers surmised that a large percentage of ethnic differences are the result of sociological factors and in these volumes he gathered what he called “the bran of history”—the uncollected, unexamined history of black people—in the hope that these neglected parts of history would become part of the mainstream body of ...
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Sex and Race, Volume 1: Negro-Caucasian Mixing in All Ages and All Lands -- The Old World

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Overview

In the Sex and Race series, first published in the 1940s, historian Joel Augustus Rogers questioned the concept of race, the origins of racial differentiation, and the root of the “color problem.” Rogers surmised that a large percentage of ethnic differences are the result of sociological factors and in these volumes he gathered what he called “the bran of history”—the uncollected, unexamined history of black people—in the hope that these neglected parts of history would become part of the mainstream body of Western history. Drawing on a vast amount of research, Rogers was attempting to point out the absurdity of racial divisions. Indeed his belief in one race—humanity—precluded the idea of several different ethnic races. The series marshals the data he had collected as evidence to prove his underlying humanistic thesis: that people were one large family without racial boundaries. Self-trained and self-published, Rogers and his work were immensely popular and influential during his day, even cited by Malcolm X. The books are presented here in their original editions.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The published works of Joel Augustus Rogers are known currently to only a handful of scholars. Even those historians and anthropologists who are aware of Rogers’ self-published and popular scholarly works tend only to remember him for the biographical portraits of African and African American leaders and his investigations of the history of “sex and race” in antiquity and in the modern era. Most contemporary college students have never heard of J.A Rogers nor are they aware of his long journalistic career and pioneering archival research. Rogers committed his life to fighting against racism and he had a major influence on black print culture through his attempts to improve race relations in the United States and challenge white supremacist tracts aimed at disparaging the history and contributions of people of African descent to world civilizations.”—Thabiti Asukile, in “Black International Journalism, Archival Research and Black Print Culture” , The Journal of African American History
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780819575548
  • Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
  • Publication date: 9/15/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 314
  • Sales rank: 785,922
  • File size: 18 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

JOEL AUGUSTUS ROGERS (September 6, 1880–March 26, 1966) was a Jamaican-American author, journalist, and historian who contributed to the history of Africa and the African diaspora, especially the history of African Americans in the United States. His research spanned the academic fields of history, sociology and anthropology. He challenged prevailing ideas about race, demonstrated the connections between civilizations, and traced African achievements. He was one of the greatest popularizers of African history in the twentieth century. Rogers addresses issues such as the lack of scientific support for the idea of race, the lack of black history being told from a black person’s perspective, and the fact of intermarriage and unions among peoples throughout history.

A respected historian and gifted lecturer, Rogers was a close personal friend of the Harlem-based intellectual and activist Hubert Harrison. In the 1920s, Rogers worked as a journalist on the Pittsburgh Courier and the Chicago Enterprise, and he served as the first black foreign correspondent from the United States.

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Table of Contents

Race Today
Which is the Oldest Race
The Mixing of Black and White in the Ancient East
Black and White in Syria, Palestine, Arabia, Persia
Who Were the First Inhabitants of India
Who Were the First Chinese?
The Negro in Ancient Greece
Negroes in Ancient Rome and Carthage
Were the Jews Originally Negroes?
Race-Mixing Under Islam
Race-Mixing Under Islam (Cont’d)
Mixing of White and Black in Africa South of the Sahara
Miscegenation in South Africa
Race-Mixing in Africa and Asia Today
Miscegenation in Spain, Portugal, and Italy
Miscegenation in Holland, Belgium, Austria, Poland, Russia
Negro-White Mixing in Germany, Ancient and Modern
The Mixing of Whites and Blacks in the British Isles
Miscegenation in France
Isabeau, Black Venus of the Reign of Louis XV
The Black Nun — Mulatto Daughter of Maria Theresa, Queen of France
Baudelaire and Jeanne Duval
APPENDICES
Race-mixing in European Literature
Did the Negro Originate in Africa or Asia?
Black Gods and Messiahs
History of the Black Madonnas
Notes and References to the Negro Under Islam
List of the Illustrations and Notes on Them
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2002

    Sex and Race opened my eyes to humanity

    We are one people the world over regardless of our skin color. The current western system of beliefs, laughs when we say that we are "equal" to others in our humanity. Mr. Rogers' breaks down every myth about race simply because "race," as we know it does not exist. With the advent of DNA, we will discover that Adam and Eve created us all, and the creator created He them. Therefore, this lie of "race" no longer has a place in the world. For if it does, we (being humanity) will contiune to dominate, murder, and hate our brothers. This world was not created out of hate, but of love. In the end J. A. Rogers' book tells mankind what we already know - there is one blood, one people that have sex... to create new caste/colors as we mix along differnt "color" lines. One love, one heart, lets give praise to the Lord, and feel alright...

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