Sex For Dinner, Death For Breakfast

Overview

This study is concerned with the literature, films, artwork, and advertising associated with Ian Fleming's James Bond 007 and examines various representations of the human body that play an integral role in his adventures. For Fleming, the body is simultaneously a site of secrecy, revelation, contact, and exposition presaging the future of politics, culture, sexuality, and consumption. The various accoutrements that are common to the 007 adventures---including elaborate references to fashion, food and drink, sex,...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $71.98   
  • New (2) from $71.98   
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

This study is concerned with the literature, films, artwork, and advertising associated with Ian Fleming's James Bond 007 and examines various representations of the human body that play an integral role in his adventures. For Fleming, the body is simultaneously a site of secrecy, revelation, contact, and exposition presaging the future of politics, culture, sexuality, and consumption. The various accoutrements that are common to the 007 adventures---including elaborate references to fashion, food and drink, sex, and methods of execution---accentuate and attune this focus. An examination of these elements and their bodily referents serves to reveal the extent to which these narratives are products of their unique cultural and historical moments and the way in which these narratives foreshadowed what was to come. The novels under analysis serve as the bookends of Fleming's canon. Bond's debut, Casino Royale (1953), depicts Fleming's secret agent as a "blunt instrument" employed by the British Secret Service in an effort to undermine the finances of the Soviet spy apparatus in an era still dominated by memories of the last World War. The final Bond novel from Fleming, The Man with the Golden Gun (1964), finds a damaged 007 striving to prove the worth of his body and mind by pitting himself against the most deadly freelance hit man in the world. The films under study---including Casino Royale adaptations produced in 1954, 1967, and 2006, as well as the film adaptation of The Man with the Golden Gun released in 1974---serve as representations of four separate and distinct decades, each demanding new interpretations of Fleming's classic characters, plots, and the accompanying symbolic bodies. The body of James Bond represents---then, now, and perhaps later---the body politic in its portrayal of what we were, are, and may well be. The appetites of the characters that populate these adventures---for clothing, food, sex, and killing---are our appetites. This study of the Bond phenomenon reveals the ways in which Fleming's popular fiction and the unending film series based upon it represent and reframe cultural fears, anxieties, hopes, and desires grounded in the body.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243635495
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/5/2011
  • Pages: 168
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)