Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable

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Overview

Bullying in schools is often discussed, but sexual harassment in schools, and how it differs from bullying is often overlooked. In fact, though, sexual harassment (committed both by fellow students and school personnel) is more common and yet more easily and quickly dismissed by those involved, though its consequences for the victim can be profound. This book provides parents, teachers, school officials, and others with a framework comparing and contrasting sexual harassment and bullying as they relate to the ...

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Sexual Harassment and Bullying: A Guide to Keeping Kids Safe and Holding Schools Accountable

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Overview

Bullying in schools is often discussed, but sexual harassment in schools, and how it differs from bullying is often overlooked. In fact, though, sexual harassment (committed both by fellow students and school personnel) is more common and yet more easily and quickly dismissed by those involved, though its consequences for the victim can be profound. This book provides parents, teachers, school officials, and others with a framework comparing and contrasting sexual harassment and bullying as they relate to the behavior, laws, and impact on children. The author describes the responsibility of the school district and how parents and other adults can navigate the schools' policies, barriers, and responsibilities. She argues that children should not be subjected to bullying OR sexual harassment, that it is the school's responsibility to make the harassment or bullying stop, and that parents and other caring adults often need to be involved and advocate for the child, even against resistance from those in the school system. Throughout the book the author uses examples of actual cases that have made it to the courts and have been precedent setting and cases in which she has been involved as an expert witness or as a consultant. Resources for readers are also provided at the end of the book.

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Editorial Reviews

Travis Hicks
A probing a deeply clarifying examination of the twin problems of sexual harassment and bullying, including a nuanced discussion of the differences between the two types of peer-based misconduct. Using practical examples and in-depth legal analysis, Susan Strauss offers a refreshingly clear-eyed look at these frequently misunderstood topics. Sexual Harassment and Bullying offers an invaluable roadmap for parents and community leaders committed to keeping children healthy and safe.
Nan D. Stein
A great starting point for many important topics for educators and families who face such issues with their children and students-easy reading on difficult subjects.
Dick Tieszen
The book is terrific! I found the book to be an exhaustive analysis of a complicated, evolving, and dangerous threat to our school environment. I find it a MUST READ by those who are charged with the responsibility of our children in schools because it is a road map to avoiding the many pitfalls of mislabeling sexual harassment as bullying.
Laura Goetz
A must read for parents and educators, this should be the go-to book for school harassment. Not only does Strauss write professionally and logically, but her accessible style gives parents the tools to take charge of their child's safety. Her in-depth research makes this book both an excellent crash course for parents and a must in professional study for educators. A copy of Sexual Harassment and Bullying needs to be placed in every school official's office and every student's home.
Jamie Nabozny
Susan Strauss provides a comprehensive understanding of what is required to keep students safe and how to hold schools accountable when they fail to do so. This book should be required reading for anyone concerned about the safety and well being of children in school.
LA Weekly
“Gay kids have long been a target of bullying. Until recently, incidents could be laughed off as “pranks,” and no one suffered any consequences, save for the gay kid. But in the last few years, that has begun to change”

“This is a group of people that just overwhelmingly are the victims of bullying and harassment”- Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn

“The world swooned earlier this month when President Barack Obama gave gay marriage his personal blessing, but his administration’s efforts to combat bullying may actually be his more valuable contribution”

“it’s important for parents to know that if the school doesn’t respond, they can file charges with the state’s Department of Civil Rights”

Booklist
Being bullied or harassed is a common fear of schoolchildren, but recently, the use of social media and the suicides of children who have been severely harassed have heightened the concern of parents and educators. Strauss draws on her experiences as consultant, former high-school teacher, and parent of a child who was sexually harassed to advise parents, teachers, and other adults on how to protect children. She begins by clearly defining bullying and sexual harassment and advising how to avoid overreacting to innocent curiosity. Strauss offers a particular focus on the kind of harassment of gay, bisexual, and transgendered students that has led to suicide in several cases, highlighting warning signs for distress in children who are harassed. She devotes a separate chapter to examining how social media, including MySpace and Facebook, have ramped up bullying and harassment. Finally, she examines laws and school policies regarding harassment and provides sound advice on how parents can hold schools accountable for misbehavior and protect their children. Strauss includes a guide for online and other contact information for helpful resources.
Star Tribune
Susan Strauss is glad to see Minnesota educators and political leaders paying greater attention to the problem of bullying, but she warns that they might be shortchanging another significant problem: harassment.
In a new book, the Eden Prairie author says that what often passes for bullying might actually be harassment, and she argues that parents shouldn't be so quick to use the bullying label if their children are being intimidated due to their gender, race or sexuality.
Bullying offers little legal recourse for victims, but state and federal laws set criminal penalties for harassment and allow victims to sue school districts that fail to prevent it.

[Strauss] described the book as a how-to guide for parents to keep schools accountable for their response to harassment and differentiating it from bullying.

"If you're just wanting to get it to stop and the school responds and makes it stop, wonderful. The label probably doesn't matter," she said. "It's when it doesn't stop that the parent needs to know" when it's harassment or when it's bullying.

Liberty Press
It's an indispensable guide for any parent or concerned adult in these times.
CHOICE
An expert on sexual harassment, Strauss (DeVry Univ. and University of Phoenix) presents a cautionary tale, urging school administrators to take bold action to prevent a culture of peer abuse. She proposes adopting a standardized nomenclature as a step toward clarifying distinctions between bullying and sexual harassment. A review of the current climate in schools reveals the propensity to label all aggressive misconduct as bullying—an overgeneralization that minimizes the significance of sexual harassment and can prove devastating for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The author warns that an inaccurate definition of behaviors that constitute sexual harassment can result in forfeiture of protection available in federal legislation to prosecute perpetrators. She also examines cyberharassment and cyberbullying, providing website resources to address cyberthreats. Strauss makes the case that all provocateurs of violence should be held accountable and that understanding the dynamics of bullying and sexual harassment can help identify those at risk and protect them. An effective tool to spark a dialogue on building community alliances to promote accountability in educational settings, this primer includes sections on anti-bullying and sexual harassment statutes, state-by-state resources, contact information for civil rights cffices, and a practical road map on "how to file a discrimination or harassment complaint." Summing Up: Recommended.
Choice
An expert on sexual harassment, Strauss (DeVry Univ. and University of Phoenix) presents a cautionary tale, urging school administrators to take bold action to prevent a culture of peer abuse. She proposes adopting a standardized nomenclature as a step toward clarifying distinctions between bullying and sexual harassment. A review of the current climate in schools reveals the propensity to label all aggressive misconduct as bullying—an overgeneralization that minimizes the significance of sexual harassment and can prove devastating for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The author warns that an inaccurate definition of behaviors that constitute sexual harassment can result in forfeiture of protection available in federal legislation to prosecute perpetrators. She also examines cyberharassment and cyberbullying, providing website resources to address cyberthreats. Strauss makes the case that all provocateurs of violence should be held accountable and that understanding the dynamics of bullying and sexual harassment can help identify those at risk and protect them. An effective tool to spark a dialogue on building community alliances to promote accountability in educational settings, this primer includes sections on anti-bullying and sexual harassment statutes, state-by-state resources, contact information for civil rights cffices, and a practical road map on "how to file a discrimination or harassment complaint." Summing Up: Recommended.
CHOICE
An expert on sexual harassment, Strauss (DeVry Univ. and University of Phoenix) presents a cautionary tale, urging school administrators to take bold action to prevent a culture of peer abuse. She proposes adopting a standardized nomenclature as a step toward clarifying distinctions between bullying and sexual harassment. A review of the current climate in schools reveals the propensity to label all aggressive misconduct as bullying--an overgeneralization that minimizes the significance of sexual harassment and can prove devastating for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The author warns that an inaccurate definition of behaviors that constitute sexual harassment can result in forfeiture of protection available in federal legislation to prosecute perpetrators. She also examines cyberharassment and cyberbullying, providing website resources to address cyberthreats. Strauss makes the case that all provocateurs of violence should be held accountable and that understanding the dynamics of bullying and sexual harassment can help identify those at risk and protect them. An effective tool to spark a dialogue on building community alliances to promote accountability in educational settings, this primer includes sections on anti-bullying and sexual harassment statutes, state-by-state resources, contact information for civil rights cffices, and a practical road map on "how to file a discrimination or harassment complaint." Summing Up: Recommended.
Star Tribune
Susan Strauss is glad to see Minnesota educators and political leaders paying greater attention to the problem of bullying, but she warns that they might be shortchanging another significant problem: harassment.
In a new book, the Eden Prairie author says that what often passes for bullying might actually be harassment, and she argues that parents shouldn't be so quick to use the bullying label if their children are being intimidated due to their gender, race or sexuality.
Bullying offers little legal recourse for victims, but state and federal laws set criminal penalties for harassment and allow victims to sue school districts that fail to prevent it.

[Strauss] described the book as a how-to guide for parents to keep schools accountable for their response to harassment and differentiating it from bullying.

"If you're just wanting to get it to stop and the school responds and makes it stop, wonderful. The label probably doesn't matter," she said. "It's when it doesn't stop that the parent needs to know" when it's harassment or when it's bullying.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442201620
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/16/2011
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 1,029,539
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Strauss RN Ed.D., is a harassment and bullying consultant, trainer, and speaker for schools and workplaces. She is an expert witness for school (Title IX) and workplace (Title VII) sexual harassment lawsuits. Susan consults with clients in the development of harassment and bullying policies, investigates complaints of harassment and bullying, and counsels repeat offenders to diminish the misconduct and create a more respectful and discriminatory free work and school environment. Her publications include Sexual Harassment and Teens: A Program for Positive Change, and numerous journal articles, book chapters, curricula, and other works focused on sexual harassment and bullying in schools and at work. She is an associate faculty member at DeVry University and University of Phoenix.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
1. Sexual Harassment, Title IX, and the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights
2. Sexual Harassment of Elementary and Special Education Students
3. Harassment of Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Transgender Students
4. Bullying
5. The Difference Between Sexual Harassment and Bullying and Why it Matters
6. Cyberharassment and Cyberbullying
7. Impact of Sexual Harassment
8. Why Don't Schools Stop Sexual Harassment and Bullying?
9. The Causes and Contributing Factors
10.Additional Laws
11. Partnering With Schools to Keep Kids Safe
12. Holding Schools Accountable
13. Conclusion

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 19, 2012

    As a mom of a transgender child that has been the subject of rel

    As a mom of a transgender child that has been the subject of relentless harassment during the school day I found this book incredibly helpful. It helped me understand the difference between harassment and bullying and that what my child was subjected to was something the school administration was legally responsible for stopping. I think too often parents think they have no recourse, or that their situation falls into the category of 'kids will be kids,' but this book showed me that our child has the right to learn in a safe environment and that what used to be thought of as typical kid behavior is unacceptable and governed by the law. I purchased 10 copies and have given them to teachers and principals in my school district as well as a representative from the Human Rights Commission.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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