Sexus: The Rosy Crucifixion I

Sexus: The Rosy Crucifixion I

4.4 9
by Henry Miller
     
 

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Henry Miller's monumental venture in self-revelation was begun with his Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, which on their American publication were hailed as "miraculous," "superb," "ribald," "brilliant," and "shamelessly shocking." Sexus is the first volume of a series called The Rosy Crucifixion, in which Miller completes his major

Overview

Henry Miller's monumental venture in self-revelation was begun with his Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, which on their American publication were hailed as "miraculous," "superb," "ribald," "brilliant," and "shamelessly shocking." Sexus is the first volume of a series called The Rosy Crucifixion, in which Miller completes his major life work. It was written in the United States during World War II, and first published in Paris in 1949. Of this remarkable project, Lawrence Durrell has said: "The completion of his seven-volume autobiography, if it fulfills the promise of what he has already given us, will put his name amongst the three or four great figures of the age."

Editorial Reviews

Choice
"Uproariously funnny... may be Miller's masterpiece."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781555846978
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
12/01/2007
Series:
Miller, Henry
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
506
Sales rank:
366,791
File size:
2 MB

What People are saying about this

Erica Jong
Miller is more mystic than pornographer. He uses the obscene to shock and awaken, but once we are awake, he wants to take us to the stars.

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Sexus: The Rosy Crucifixion I 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In a fit of intellectual curiosity, I began to do research on Henry Miller and his work. I was consumed by the idea of him and his books, so I dove right into Sexus expecting great things. The first 20 or more pages did not disappoint. They were filled with profound and genious insight. And truthfully, this genious stays with the book until the very end, but not entirely. It is sporadic, at best. After a number of pages, you will notice a complete change in writing style. Then you will notice a lack of any intelligent insight. Then many completely unintersting, nonsensical 5 page tangents. Then you will realize that there is no flow to this book. It is choppy. Then you will realize you are following a terrible story line with terribly dull characters. You will lose the story line multiple times, just as he does, and you will be completely turned off for 3 or 4 dozen pages at a time. You will skim pages looking for something, but will find nothing. Perhaps this book could have been good if there was a definate story line to it. A terrible mistake Miller makes is thinking that the reader actually cares much for his life. For those looking to be enlightened by Miller's artistry. And for those looking to be enlightened as an artist. And for those looking for a profoundly mystical thought that will completely change lives. You will not find it here. Henry Miller may have been a literary genious, but he certainly was not a writer.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Like gears interlocking, this book seemed almost a part of the experiences I was having at the time of reading. It was as if one were reflecting the other and vice versa. Passages appeared suddenly as if summoned, answering questions I hadn't even finished formulating--leading me on to an understanding of a higher order to things. Not as good as the Tropics, but when he gets rolling, hold on!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Probably the best erotic book every written. I read this bood for the first time when it was banned in the U.S. I re-read it so often it finally fell apart.