Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers: & Other Unusual Relationships

Overview

Vampire bats that regurgitate blood for roosting buddies. Mosquitoes that filch honeydew droplets from ants. Reptiles that enforce chastity on their lovers with copulatory plugs. Capuchin monkeys that use millipede secretions as mosquito repellent. The natural world is full of unusual relationships, and negotiation between life-forms striving to survive is evolution at its most diverse, entertaining, and awe-inspiring. 

Picking up where her highly popular Headless Males ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$22.59
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$25.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (26) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $10.90   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Vampire bats that regurgitate blood for roosting buddies. Mosquitoes that filch honeydew droplets from ants. Reptiles that enforce chastity on their lovers with copulatory plugs. Capuchin monkeys that use millipede secretions as mosquito repellent. The natural world is full of unusual relationships, and negotiation between life-forms striving to survive is evolution at its most diverse, entertaining, and awe-inspiring. 

Picking up where her highly popular Headless Males Make Great Lovers left off, tropical field biologist Marty Crump takes us on another voyage of discovery into the world of unusual natural histories, this time focusing on extraordinary interactions involving animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers & Other Unusual Relationships illuminates the ceaseless give-and-take between species. Occasionally, both interacting parties benefit, like when hornbills and dwarf mongooses hunt together for food. Other times, like when mites ride in hummingbirds’ nostrils to reach their next meal of nectar, one individual benefits and the other is neither helped nor harmed. But sometimes one individual benefits at the expense of the other; you need only recall your last sinus infection to understand how that works.

Throughout, Crump brings her trademark spunk and zest to these stories of intimate exchange. She introduces readers to penguins that babysit, pseudoscorpions that ride and mate under the wings of giant harlequin beetles, and parasitic fungi that bend insects to their will. A lively companion to Crump’s earlier work, Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers & Other Unusual Relationships captures the bizarre and befuddling aspects of the behavior of animals, plants, and microbes. After this entertaining romp through the world of natural relationships, you’ll never look at an orchid the same way again.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Boston Globe

"Charmingly written—and charmingly illustrated by the author’s brother Alan—the book is a believe-it-or-not treasury of glue-spitting soldier ants, divorced birds, monkeys that dose themselves with herbal cures, and underwater day spas where big fish suspend their practice of eating little fish in exchange for getting their scales groomed and their teeth cleaned. Less easily anthropomorphized species, fungi and bacteria, come in for their own share of behavioral observation. Crump’s entertaining anecdotes build to a heartfelt moral: The world is a wondrous place, and it is our obligation to keep it that way."

— Amanda Heller

Audubon Magazine

"In this jaunty, jovial, somewhat anthropomorphizing romp, behavioral ecologist Marty Crump catalogs a range of interdependent species behaviors—from the semi-social to the purely ecological—that make up life on earth. Some of the relationships she details—like the pseudoscorpion that mates on the back of a South American giant harlequin beetle—may seem odd, but then again, she infers, it's efficient to get all that loving done in transit. . . . Crump's zoology contains housecleaners, groomers, and even marital squabbles. If all this domesticates the natural world, it also makes the human one seem more contiguous with it. Crump leaves us feeling, in our human-yet-animal skin, just a tad stranger."

— Tess Taylor

The Daily Telegraph

"I am grateful to Crump for having brought so many amazing facts to my attention and I am impressed by the industry shown by her and her colleagues. One group whose work she alludes to has been studying a colony of yellow-bellied marmots in Colorado since 1962. Forty-seven years spent watching a whistling rodent – that’s what I call dedication."

— Tom Fort

Washington Post

"Need some quirky icebreakers to make it through a holiday season's worth of awkward party conversations? Look no further than behavior ecologist Marty Crump's new collection of weird animal behaviors, a follow-up to 2005's Headless Males Make Great Lovers. Her new book focuses on unusual relationships in nature between animals and plants. The title essay describes how, "from an orchid's perspective, all is fair in love and cross-pollination." One-third of orchid species offer their pollinators no nectar. But by swaying seductively in the breeze or mimicking the smell of female insects, the orchids trick horny male insects into pollinating them. Elsewhere in the book, Crump even explains why dogs roll in stinky spots, a behavior that has perplexed many a pet owner: Turns out Fluffy is masking her own scent, enabling her to sneak up on prey undetected or, some experts think, helping her attract more attention from other dogs."

— Rachel Saslow

New Scientist

"Her precise but jolly prose treats hummingbird nostril mites, blood-sharing vampire bats and bubble-hunting whales with such enthusiasm that it is like meeting long-lost friends. . . . astly enjoyable."

— Adrian Barnett

Booklist
"Another successful blend of charm and nature. . . . As pleasant a sojourn into so many different worlds as any reader could want."
New Scientist - Adrian Barnett
"Her precise but jolly prose treats hummingbird nostril mites, blood-sharing vampire bats and bubble-hunting whales with such enthusiasm that it is like meeting long-lost friends. . . . Vastly enjoyable."
Boston Globe - Amanda Heller
"Charmingly written—and charmingly illustrated by the author’s brother Alan—the book is a believe-it-or-not treasury of glue-spitting soldier ants, divorced birds, monkeys that dose themselves with herbal cures, and underwater day spas where big fish suspend their practice of eating little fish in exchange for getting their scales groomed and their teeth cleaned. Less easily anthropomorphized species, fungi and bacteria, come in for their own share of behavioral observation. Crump’s entertaining anecdotes build to a heartfelt moral: The world is a wondrous place, and it is our obligation to keep it that way."
Audubon Magazine - Tess Taylor
"In this jaunty, jovial, somewhat anthropomorphizing romp, behavioral ecologist Marty Crump catalogs a range of interdependent species behaviors—from the semi-social to the purely ecological—that make up life on earth. Some of the relationships she details—like the pseudoscorpion that mates on the back of a South American giant harlequin beetle—may seem odd, but then again, she infers, it's efficient to get all that loving done in transit. . . . Crump's zoology contains housecleaners, groomers, and even marital squabbles. If all this domesticates the natural world, it also makes the human one seem more contiguous with it. Crump leaves us feeling, in our human-yet-animal skin, just a tad stranger."
The Daily Telegraph - Tom Fort
"I am grateful to Crump for having brought so many amazing facts to my attention and I am impressed by the industry shown by her and her colleagues. One group whose work she alludes to has been studying a colony of yellow-bellied marmots in Colorado since 1962. Forty-seven years spent watching a whistling rodent – that’s what I call dedication."
Washington Post - Rachel Saslow
"Need some quirky icebreakers to make it through a holiday season's worth of awkward party conversations? Look no further than behavior ecologist Marty Crump's new collection of weird animal behaviors, a follow-up to 2005's Headless Males Make Great Lovers. Her new book focuses on unusual relationships in nature between animals and plants. The title essay describes how, "from an orchid's perspective, all is fair in love and cross-pollination." One-third of orchid species offer their pollinators no nectar. But by swaying seductively in the breeze or mimicking the smell of female insects, the orchids trick horny male insects into pollinating them. Elsewhere in the book, Crump even explains why dogs roll in stinky spots, a behavior that has perplexed many a pet owner: Turns out Fluffy is masking her own scent, enabling her to sneak up on prey undetected or, some experts think, helping her attract more attention from other dogs."
Choice
“This work offers a delicious smorgasbord of fascinating species interactions. Readers are treated to descriptions of and explanations for a variety of exotic behaviors and remarkable relationships between organisms. . . . It should inspire everyone to become a naturalist.”
Choice
“This work offers a delicious smorgasbord of fascinating species interactions. Readers are treated to descriptions of and explanations for a variety of exotic behaviors and remarkable relationships between organisms. . . . It should inspire everyone to become a naturalist.”
Washington Post

"Need some quirky icebreakers to make it through a holiday season's worth of awkward party conversations? Look no further than behavior ecologist Marty Crump's new collection of weird animal behaviors, a follow-up to 2005's Headless Males Make Great Lovers. Her new book focuses on unusual relationships in nature between animals and plants. The title essay describes how, "from an orchid's perspective, all is fair in love and cross-pollination." One-third of orchid species offer their pollinators no nectar. But by swaying seductively in the breeze or mimicking the smell of female insects, the orchids trick horny male insects into pollinating them. Elsewhere in the book, Crump even explains why dogs roll in stinky spots, a behavior that has perplexed many a pet owner: Turns out Fluffy is masking her own scent, enabling her to sneak up on prey undetected or, some experts think, helping her attract more attention from other dogs."—Rachel Saslow, Washington Post

— Rachel Saslow

Choice

“This work offers a

Booklist

"Another successful blend of charm and nature...as pleasant a sojourn into so many different worlds as any reader could want."—Booklist

Boston Globe

"Charmingly written—and charmingly illustrated by the author’s brother Alan—the book is a believe-it-or-not treasury of glue-spitting soldier ants, divorced birds, monkeys that dose themselves with herbal cures, and underwater day spas where big fish suspend their practice of eating little fish in exchange for getting their scales groomed and their teeth cleaned. Less easily anthropomorphized species, fungi and bacteria, come in for their own share of behavioral observation. Crump’s entertaining anecdotes build to a heartfelt moral: The world is a wondrous place, and it is our obligation to keep it that way."—Amanda Heller, Boston Globe

— Amanda Heller

New Scientist

"Vastly enjoyable."—Adrian Barnett, New Scientist

— Adrian Barnett

Audubon Magazine

"In this jaunty, jovial, somewhat anthropomorphizing romp, behavioral ecologist Marty Crump catalogs a range of interdependent species behaviors—from the semi-social to the purely ecological—that make up life on earth. Some of the relationships she details—like the pseudoscorpion that mates on the back of a South American giant harlequin beetle—may seem odd, but then again, she infers, it's efficient to get all that loving done in transit. . . . Crump's zoology contains housecleaners, groomers, and even marital squabbles. If all this domesticates the natural world, it also makes the human one seem more contiguous with it. Crump leaves us feeling, in our human-yet-animal skin, just a tad stranger."—Tess Taylor, Audubon Magazine

— Tess Taylor

The Daily Telegraph

"I am grateful to Crump for having brought so many amazing facts to my attention and I am impressed by the industry shown by her and her colleagues. One group whose work she alludes to has been studying a colony of yellow-bellied marmots in Colorado since 1962. Forty-seven years spent watching a whistling rodent – that’s what I call dedication."—Tom Fort, The Daily Telegraph (UK)

— Tom Fort

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226121857
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 11/1/2009
  • Pages: 214
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Marty Crump is a behavioral ecologist who has worked with tropical amphibians in the areas of parental care, reproduction, territoriality, cannibalism, and tadpole ecology. An adjunct professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University, she is the author of In Search of the Golden Frog and Headless Males Make Great Lovers, both published by the University of Chicago Press.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

SEXY ORCHIDS MAKE LOUSY LOVERS & OTHER UNUSUAL RELATIONSHIPS


By MARTY CRUMP

The University of Chicago Press

Copyright © 2009 The University of Chicago
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-226-12185-7


Chapter One

Whatever Happened to Baby Booby? & Other Interactions among Animals of the Same Kind

CONSIDER THE RELATIONSHIPS you have with other people. You might interact with grandparents, parents, siblings, your spouse, your children, friends, neighbors, your boss, coworkers, and strangers—all in the same day. You might depend on other people for food, shelter, protection, spiritual guidance, legal or financial advice, learning, emotional support, transportation, medical care, child care, and a host of other services. Some of our interpersonal interactions are mutually beneficial. Sometimes only one individual gains. And sometimes one person gains while the other gets hurt.

Animals of other species also interact with one another in many ways. The most basic interaction is sex. Even most animals that live solitary lives get together once in a while—to mate. But mating isn't always harmonious. We'll look at what happens when males and females have different ideas about mating: "battles between the sexes" that involve resistance, coercion, and even enforced chastity. Next we'll focus on animals that sometimes put humans to shame when it comes to sustaining long-term partnerships: birds. About 90 percent of all bird species are bonded to a single partner. That doesn't mean all are sexually faithful, though. Far from it. As you'll see, long-term partnerships and adultery often go hand in hand. Some birds even "divorce" their mates. Still, others stay together and are sexually faithful their entire lives.

Sex isn't everything. Social animals often cooperate outside of mating, for example, to remove ticks and other foreign material from the skin, fur, or feathers of relatives or buddies. They may form hunting partnerships or defend each other from predators. Some animals provide child-care services: they babysit young that are not their own. Others offer food to friends and relatives. Each of these themes involves fascinating and sometimes quirky behaviors.

Not all relationships are positive. Sibling rivalry isn't confined to humans, and certain animals take it to an extreme: they kill and may even eat their brothers and sisters. Be glad you weren't a late-developing sand shark embryo, the fastest-developing Cuban treefrog tadpole in the family, or the second-hatched blue-footed booby.

NOT TONIGHT, HONEY

Nobody will ever win the battle of the sexes. There's too much fraternizing with the enemy.

HENRY KISSINGER

We joke that from a reproductive standpoint men are "expendable" because they can contribute to reproduction often and over a long period of time. They're a dime a dozen. In contrast, females are more "valuable" because they can reproduce only a small number of times in their lives.

Is there any biological basis to the expendable/valuable argument? Yes, and humans aren't alone in this regard. Bear with me a moment before we get to the stories. One commonly held viewpoint is that sex role is determined largely by initial investment in gametes, or sex cells. Males produce lots of tiny sperm. Females produce few, energy-rich eggs; thus, their initial investment in offspring is much greater than that of males. A male can maximize his paternity potential by mating with as many females as possible. A female, though, often needs only one male per reproductive season to fertilize her eggs. Whereas a female might benefit by choosing her mate carefully, it often pays for a male to sow his wild oats widely. What this means is that males often compete for the limited number of receptive females.

In nature when males try to mate as often as possible and compete with each other for limited encounters while females hold out for the "best" males, the differing goals can lead to conflict between the sexes. Sometimes the conflict involves coercion, manipulation, deceit, and even physical harm by one sex to the other. And the other sex doesn't just take this lying down. Consider the following non-human examples.

ONE SUMMER I STUDIED aggressive behavior in variable harlequin frogs (Atelopus varius) in the mountains of Costa Rica. My study site was a forest stream where the frogs congregated on boulders in the water and on the ground nearby. The frogs were active during the day, and as long as I stood or sat quietly, I could watch without disturbing them. Each variable harlequin frog has a unique black-and-yellow color pattern. I took a Polaroid picture of each frog and kept a mug file so that I could recognize individuals.

Like most male frogs, a male variable harlequin climbs onto the larger female and clasps her with his forelimbs in a position called "amplexus." In most species of frogs, the pair stays in amplexus for a few to 24 hours before the female lays eggs and the male fertilizes them externally. In the variable harlequin, however, the male stays locked in amplexus for days or weeks! Because piggybacking males sit too high off the ground to capture much food, toward the end of the breeding season they become frightfully emaciated. One wonders how these weakened males can still get excited enough to fertilize their mates' eggs!

Why might males hang on so long in amplexus? On any given day, the sex ratio of frogs out and about at the stream was strongly skewed toward males. Most of the females were probably hiding in rock crevices. Perhaps once a male encounters a female during the breeding season, he mounts and hangs on because he might not get another opportunity to mate. But why should a female put up with lugging around a male for days or weeks when there are plenty of males to go around?

One afternoon as I sat on a mossy boulder near the spray zone of a two-foot waterfall, the answer became obvious: Females don't put up with it. I spotted movement on the rock face: a pair of amplexing harlequin frogs. The female slowly lifted one hind limb, rolled a bit to the opposite side, and tried to dislodge the male. For the next four hours, she worked to shed her piggybacking suitor. She crawled into a crevice and tried to scrape him off by rocking back and forth. When that didn't work, she crawled back out and bounced up and down like a bucking bronco. The male held tight. A week later I found the same pair on the same rock face. During the 30 minutes I watched them, the pair sat passively. The female might have been too exhausted to fight back, was taking a breather, or was nearly ready to lay eggs.

Over the next few weeks, I watched other females try to dislodge males. In each case where the female was successful, the dislodged male dismounted over the female's head. Big mistake. Payback time. Each time the female pounced on the male and jumped up and down, pounding his head against the ground or rock with her forelimbs.

Clearly, prolonged amplexus presents a conflict of interest for the sexes. It makes sense that a male should nab a female when he can, but if the female's eggs are not mature yet, she is stuck lugging around a deadweight for days or weeks. It's difficult to say who's winning the battle of the sexes in these harlequin frogs. From what I observed, it was a tie. About half the males hung on. The rest got dumped and stomped on.

So, what does a female gain by attempting to dump a male that has jumped on too soon? One possibility is that by resisting males, females end up with the strongest and most tenacious guys around—great genes to pass on to the kids. Alternatively, male quality might not be involved at all. Perhaps females not yet ready to lay eggs resist amorous males simply to avoid wasting energy lugging them around.

HAVE YOU EVER watched water striders, those long-legged, slender insects that skate on the surface of ponds or slow-moving streams? In many species, males use either their antennae or legs to grasp reluctant females during mating. Once a male grabs a female, he hangs on and she is stuck carrying him—just as in variable harlequin frogs. She skates for the two of them, which costs her 20 percent more energy. Also, because she now skates more slowly and is less agile than when alone, she is both more likely to get eaten and is less efficient hunting for food.

Her defense? Female water striders have antigrasping structures. For example, females of some species have elongated spines that flank their genitalia and discourage unwanted suitors. Females that try to resist grasping males might come out ahead. As with variable harlequin frogs, the females' eventual partners might be those males strong enough or persistent enough to overcome females' resistance. Or resisting females might simply live longer and/or find more food.

So, who's currently winning the arms race in water striders: persistent males or resisting females? In those species where males have exaggerated grasping structures and females have exaggerated antigrasping structures, it may be too close to call. In some species, male grasping structures are stronger than female antigrasping structures, and mating rates are high. Score one for males. In other species where the reverse is true, mating rates are low. Score one for females.

A MORE EXTREME example of sexual conflict involves bedbugs. These flat 1/5- to ¼-inch-long bugs look remarkably like apple seeds—same color and shape. Unlike most apple seeds, though, human bedbugs make disagreeable houseguests. After dark they crawl out from crevices in bedding and mattresses and gravitate toward warmth and carbon dioxide: sleeping people. They pierce skin and suck blood.

Regardless of how we might feel about the feeding habits of bedbugs, their reproductive habits are fascinating. Males of species with internal fertilization normally insert their reproductive organs into the females' reproductive tracts during copulation. Not so with bedbugs. They display "traumatic insemination." Sounds nasty, doesn't it? It is, from the female's perspective. A male bedbug mounts the female sideways, grasps her with his legs, curves his abdomen under hers, pierces his dagger-like external genitalia through the underside of her abdominal wall, and ejaculates sperm and fluids into her body cavity. Sperm travel from the female's blood into storage structures, then on to the ovaries, where the eggs are fertilized. Although the female's reproductive tract is fully functional, it ends up being used only for laying eggs. You're probably wondering why. This unusual mating system may have evolved as a way for males to overcome resistant females. It seems that male bedbugs are way ahead of male harlequin frogs and water striders—if you want to look at it that way.

What about the female bedbug's point of view, though? Can traumatic insemination hurt her? Yes. She might experience blood loss, infection, or an immune reaction to the sperm and fluids introduced into her blood. In addition, wound repair and healing require energy that could be spent on something else, such as foraging for more blood. Females forced to mate repeatedly don't live as long as less molested females. Is there anything female bedbugs can do to resist males? Like female variable harlequin frogs, females of some kinds of bedbugs vigorously shake males that try to mount them. If successful, the females run away.

Even more remarkable is that females of many advanced species of bedbugs have a secondary reproductive system called the "paragenital system," which consists of one or both of two parts. The ectospermalege is a region of swollen and often folded tissue centered in the abdominal wall where males would normally try to pierce females. This tissue provides the female with some protection from the stab. The mesospermalege, located underneath the ectospermalege, is a pocket or sac attached to the inner surface of the abdominal wall. This sac receives the ejaculate if the male succeeds in penetrating. As a point of interest, the human bedbug has both structures. Experiments suggest that these structures reduce the direct costs of piercing trauma and infection by pathogens introduced with the piercing. In an evolutionary sense, females have fought back.

LET'S GO TO some less abusive relationships. Females of some animal species having internal fertilization mate with more than one male to fertilize a cycle of eggs, but some of those presumptive fathers may not sire any of the eggs. In some species, males have a mechanical way of ensuring that their own sperm will indeed hit the jackpot: copulatory (mating) plugs that serve to enforce chastity from then on. In rats, guinea pigs, squirrels, and other rodents, this plug is formed in the female's vagina by a coagulating substance in the male's seminal fluid. Males of garter snakes and some other snake species produce copulatory plugs composed of proteins and lipids from their kidneys. They insert these plugs into the females' cloacae following insemination. Certain insects have ingenious copulatory plugs: their own body parts. After mating, a female biting midge eats her mate, but his genitalia stay lodged in her genital opening and provide a plug that inhibits other males from inseminating her. When a male honeybee catches a virgin queen during her nuptial flight, he too gives his all. His genitalia explode inside the female. Leaving his privates inside to block the queen's vagina, he falls to the ground and dies.

A copulatory plug might assure paternity for the male, but what good is it for the female? It might prevent her from being hassled by other males, but it might not always be a benefit. What if she were later to come across a "better" mate? Or what if mating with additional males might increase the genetic diversity of her offspring? In species with female promiscuity, there's often a conflict of interest between the sexes: it's a male's advantage to be the only mate, but the female gains by engaging in multiple matings—exceptions to the "normal" pattern. In some of these species, females circumvent the copulatory plugs just as amorous medieval maidens might have figured out how to wriggle out of chastity belts.

John Koprowski spied on the sex lives of fox squirrels and eastern gray squirrels on the campus of the University of Kansas. He observed that following copulation, females groomed their genitalia. While cleaning themselves, they often removed copulatory plugs with their incisors. Sometimes the squirrels ate their plugs; sometimes they threw them onto the ground. By removing the plugs, females could later mate with additional males.

It's to a female honeybee's advantage to mate multiple times, to store more sperm. But what's the use of re-mating if she is plugged up with a previous lover's genitalia? Male honeybees have evolved a way of dislodging their predecessors' copulatory plugs. This allows a "Johnny-come-lately" male a stab at paternity, but because it also increases the quantity of sperm the female receives, both sexes benefit. Think about it, though. The "Johnny-come-lately" male gains by not having his exploded genitalia removed in turn by a successor, whereas the female gains by having it removed so she can accumulate more sperm. There's conflict between the sexes again.

So, how does a male honeybee remove another male's genitalia? If you ever have occasion to examine a male honeybee's phallus, look for the hairy structure at the tip. That's what he uses to try to gouge out the previous male's privates—"try," because not all attempts are successful. After all, if genitalia-gouging were 100 percent successful, it wouldn't ever pay for our male to leave behind his own privates unless he could be sure that he was the "Johnny-come-latest!"

THE BATTLE OF the sexes is a dynamic evolutionary process. At a given point in time, it might appear that one sex is ahead in the running battle. But give the other sex time, and the odds will probably even out. Henry Kissinger was right. Neither males nor females will win the battle of the sexes. We need each other—even though at times the opposite sex might act like a different species.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from SEXY ORCHIDS MAKE LOUSY LOVERS & OTHER UNUSUAL RELATIONSHIPS by MARTY CRUMP Copyright © 2009 by The University of Chicago. Excerpted by permission of The University of Chicago Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface

Acknowledgments

1 · Whatever Happened to Baby Booby?

& Other Interactions among Animals of the Same Kind

Not Tonight, Honey

To Have and to Hold

You Scratch My Back, I’ll Scratch Yours

Bubble Blowers, Pothole Plugs, and Other Group Hunting Roles

The Babysitters’ Club

Sound the Alarm!

An Intimate Act

Whatever Happened to Baby Booby?

2 · Taken to the Cleaners,

& Other Interactions between Animal Species

Hunting Partners

Taken to the Cleaners

She’s Got a Ticket to Ride

Houseguests, Unlike Dead Fish, Don’t Always Smell in Three Days

Be It Ever So Humble

Raising the Devil’s Spawn

Defense Contracts

Cow Pie No. 5

Audacious Pirates and Sneaky Burglars

3 · Green, Green Plants of Home,

& Other Interactions between Animals and Plants

Sexy Orchids Make Lousy Lovers, and Other Orchid Contrivances

A Seedy Neighborhood

The Green, Green Plants of Home

Powerful Plant Products

There’s the Rub

Ants and Plants

4 · Invasion of the Body Snatchers,

& Other Interactions with Fungi and Bacteria

Intestinal Microbes and the Gas We Pass

Deadly Dragon Drool

Mighty Mushrooms and Other Good Fungus among Us

Bombarded by Bacteria

A Cloak of Antibiotics

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

Body Snatchers Revisited

Conserve Interactions, Not Just Species

Glossary

References Consulted and Suggested Reading

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)