Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band [Remastered]

Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band [Remastered]

4.8 20
by The Beatles
     
 

In 1967, John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the biggest stars in the world. But Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys had just released Pet Sounds and in the process created a new landmark in ambition and beauty in rock. What were the British pair to do? They responded with Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, by turns a…  See more details below

Overview

In 1967, John Lennon and Paul McCartney were the biggest stars in the world. But Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys had just released Pet Sounds and in the process created a new landmark in ambition and beauty in rock. What were the British pair to do? They responded with Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, by turns a drugged-out, merry, intoxicating, funny, sad, nostalgic, psychedelic, obscure, and crystal-clear song cycle that sometimes played like a concept album (there's this band, see, that introduces this big star named Billy Shears...) and sometimes played more abstractly. In the latter case, the album reads as a personal odyssey through the windmills of a generation's mind: a mind full of music, ambition, societal pressures, childhood, dreams good and bad-and thoughts about getting to first base with a girl named Rita. More than 30 years after its release, the record still impresses any number of ways. There's McCartney's effortless mastery of all manner of pop styles, including the music-hall cameo "When I'm Sixty-Four," the ballad "She's Leaving Home," and the rock classic that is the title song; as well as Lennon's wild excursions into psychedelia ("Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds," "Good Morning, Good Morning"); George Harrison's mystical, dramatic sitar composition, "Within You Without You" -- even Ringo Starr's steady drumming and his timeless, everyman vocals on "A Little Help from My Friends." And to conclude the record is "A Day in the Life," arguably rock music's most empathetic, sublime creation: a suicide, a ringing alarm clock, and the chord to end all chords.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
With Revolver, the Beatles made the Great Leap Forward, reaching a previously unheard-of level of sophistication and fearless experimentation. Sgt. Pepper, in many ways, refines that breakthrough, as the Beatles consciously synthesized such disparate influences as psychedelia, art-song, classical music, rock & roll, and music hall, often in the course of one song. Not once does the diversity seem forced -- the genius of the record is how the vaudevillian "When I'm 64" seems like a logical extension of "Within You Without You" and how it provides a gateway to the chiming guitars of "Lovely Rita." There's no discounting the individual contributions of each member or their producer, George Martin, but the preponderance of whimsy and self-conscious art gives the impression that Paul McCartney is the leader of the Lonely Hearts Club Band. He dominates the album in terms of compositions, setting the tone for the album with his unabashed melodicism and deviously clever arrangements. In comparison, Lennon's contributions seem fewer, and a couple of them are a little slight but his major statements are stunning. "With a Little Help From My Friends" is the ideal Ringo tune, a rolling, friendly pop song that hides genuine Lennon anguish, à la "Help!"; "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" remains one of the touchstones of British psychedelia; and he's the mastermind behind the bulk of "A Day in the Life," a haunting number that skillfully blends Lennon's verse and chorus with McCartney's bridge. It's possible to argue that there are better Beatles albums, yet no album is as historically important as this. After Sgt. Pepper, there were no rules to follow -- rock and pop bands could try anything, for better or worse. Ironically, few tried to achieve the sweeping, all-encompassing embrace of music as the Beatles did here.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
09/09/2009
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0094638241928
catalogNumber:
82419
Rank:
707

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
  2. With A Little Help From My Friends
  3. Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds
  4. Getting Better
  5. Fixing A Hole
  6. She's Leaving Home
  7. Being For The Benefit Of Mr Kite
  8. Within You Without You
  9. When I'm Sixty Four
  10. Lovely Rita
  11. Good Morning Good Morning
  12. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (Reprise)
  13. A Day In The Life
  14. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band Documentary

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Beatles   Primary Artist

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

sergeant sargent pepper 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 20 reviews.
poughkeepsiejohn More than 1 year ago
There's no way to simply gauge just how great and influential The Beatles 1967 album "Sgt. Pepper" has become. Forty-two years since its release, people still talk about it, people still write about it, people still listen to it and people still love it. On September 9th 2009, Capitol/Parlophone will finally re-release all of The Fab Four's albums on CD and give them the sonic respect they should've gotten in the first place. First and foremost, of course, is "Sgt. Pepper", which has lost none of its luster and crackle. The album, which was easily inspired by Brian Wilson's sonically beautiful "Pet Sounds", has John Lennon and Paul McCartney feeding off that masterpiece and in turn, making their own. Rambling psychedelia, poignant ballads, fanciful British music-hall tunes and Indian raga songs are all here. Although The Beatles weren't touring anymore, they still made the first (and arguably finest) concept album of all time. All this and "A Day In The Life" replete with that swirling orchestra, that lone piano note, that dog whistle and The Beatles rambling off until somebody shuts off the phonograph. And just three years after making "Sgt. Pepper", The Beatles would be no more. Paul McCartney once said that he didn't feel that anybody was "musically educated" unless they heard "Pet Sounds". I feel the same way about "Sgt. Pepper".
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stteveo More than 1 year ago
This Album really changed everything, including the Beatles. Up until then, songs were no longer 2 1/2 min "hit singles" played on the AM radio. After Pepper, everyone bought albums, and bought an FM radio. In fact much of this album was banned on AM radio, leaving such tame cuts as "When I'm 64" left to be played, the only really safe song, that one could be sure didn't mention drugs. I bought mine in Mono, because I didn't want to wait to save the extra money to get it in stereo, not, at that time, knowing, Mono was the way to go. (and I was disappointed at how my stereo copy of Rubber Soul sounded, voice on one speaker, music on the other, stereo was yet to be special) Was surprised when I finially bought the Pepper CD at how different it sounded from all the listenings of my album. You should have both the NEW Mono and Stereo copy of Pepper. There will never be another Beatles, or SGT. Peppers, nor will the world, or I, for that matter, be the same. A must have, even though, not my favorite Beatle Album.
GinaS13 More than 1 year ago
This album has always been my favorite. The sound quality is excellent. This record makes me happy!
SeattleSlackkey More than 1 year ago
Music is cleaner but still retains that signature multi-track engineering and fullness that is sometimes overdone in re-masters. Disappointed at the computer "extras" that were included -it did not run on my Macintosh at all so it was worthless.
Iain010100 More than 1 year ago
What can I say, this is one of the most influential and creative albums in history. The songs have withstood these many years and are as fresh now as they were then. Compare that to the other ground-breaking album "Pet Sounds" by the Beach Boys where the songs just sound outdated. The newly mastered quality brings crystal clarity to these ancient recordings. The packaging includes some old photos of the original artwork shrunk down to fit the CD booklet format. Included on the audio CD is a small documentary. The documentary is only about ten minutes and doesn't include any detailed information about the making of Sgt. Peppers.
T-Lynn More than 1 year ago
If you love the Beatles, you MUST have this CD. The packaging and sound quality are excellent. The CD literally takes you to the "fair" and introduces you to the "band", in another place in time, and runs the gamut of emotions and feelings. It will make you smile with the delight at the whimsy, tug at your heart with the melancholy and dazzle you with the commitment to the intricate instrumentalities. I especially liked the packaging and the booklet inside the CD package, which explains the technical and production aspects of the ground-breaking musical endeavor by the Beatles. This CD clearly emphasizes why the Beatles were and continue to be the group that has set the bar for content and performance. You will be hard pressed to pick a favorite, as all the tracks are excellent. This is one CD that I would definitely take to a desert island.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago